×
You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

Shepard Smith Calls President Trump’s Press Conference ‘Crazy’

Shepard Smith, the Fox News anchor, on Thursday afternoon seemed to have had enough of Donald Trump’s slams at the media as peddlers of “fake news” — or, when it comes to CNN, “very fake news.”

“It is crazy what we are watching every day, it is absolutely crazy,” Smith said. “He keeps repeating ridiculous throwaway lines that are not true at all and sort of avoiding this issue of Russia as if we are some kind of fools for asking the question.”

Smith then started to look into the camera and added, “Really? Your opposition was hacked, and the Russians were responsible for it, and your people were on the phone on the same day it was happening, and we are fools for asking those questions? No sir, we are not fools for asking those questions, and we demand to know the answer to this question. You owe this to the American people.”

Smith was defending CNN correspondent Jim Acosta.

Trump’s near 80-minute, blustery and bombastic press conference was in many ways the kind he would deliver during the campaign — leaving many in the media a bit disoriented at what they witnessed. The difference this time is that the gamesmanship of a campaign have given way to governing. Trump is president and is trying to cope with its demands, in particular an unfolding situation in which an apparently alarmed intelligence community is leaking information to major news outlets, much of it unflattering and disconcerting.

As long as Trump’s press conference was, just of fraction of it seemed to be devoted to answers about who-knew-what-and-when when it came to campaign contacts with Vladimir Putin’s regime. He called the Trump-Russia connection a “ruse,” and said, “I have nothing to do with Russia.” He also said that he had been warned that a nuclear holocaust with Russia “would be like no other.”

Instead, it was dominated by Trump’s attacks on the media, singling out individual news outlets, even individual shows, for scorn or praise. He tried to discredit news outlets for low ratings and the news media in general for low approval ratings, insisting what they are reporting is fake but what has been leaked is “real.” He explained the discrepancy as a matter of “tone.”

Smith’s reference to “ridiculous throwaway lines” may not have just referred to Trump’s “fake news” and “fake media” catchphrases, but his fixation on the size of his electoral college victory. When Trump boasted that his 306 electoral votes (actually 304) was the largest since Ronald Reagan, reporters corrected him. Barack Obama got more in 2012 in 2008, as did George H.W. Bush in 1988 — facts that are easily verified by a Google search.

“I was given that information. I don’t know. I was just given it. We had a very, very big margin,” Trump explained.

The reason for the press conference was to announce his new nominee for labor secretary, but Trump went through a laundry list of accomplishments in the month since he has been in office, insisting that he has been fulfilling campaign promises. But that message of reassurance got lost in many other moments, like his announcement that the White House is working on a new immigration executive order and that he’d be willing to meet with the Congressional Black Caucus. The latter came after April Ryan of Urban Radio Networks asked him about it and he responded, “Are they friends of yours? Set up the meeting.”

The kind of jaw dropping moments earned Trump a dominance of media time during the campaign. Now, there’s no doubt that Trump will dominate the news, no matter what. The question is whether it will help or hurt him in the long run — if these kinds of showy, unpredictable press conferences will his proof that he’s shaking things up in D.C. or will reinforce the idea of an administration in chaos.

For now, Trump insists that his White House is a “fine-tuned machine,” even if he’s not shy about showing his frustrations.

Nor is the “fake media.”

CNN’s Jake Tapper, in his own state of disbelief about the press conference, also looked into the camera on Thursday and said, “President Trump, if you are watching. You are the president. You legitimately won the presidency. Now get to work and stop whining about it.”

Later, CBS News’ Scott Pelley said on Thursday’s newscast, “Today, we learned the length of the president’s fuse: 28 days.”

More Biz

  • Discovery CEO David Zaslav Sees 2018

    Discovery CEO David Zaslav Sees 2018 Compensation Soar to $129.4 Million

    Discovery Inc. president-CEO David Zaslav is once again making headlines for an enormous compensation package. Zaslav’s 2018 compensation soared to $129.44 million in 2018, fueled by stock options and grants awarded as the longtime Discovery chief signed a new employment contract last July that takes him through 2023 at the cable programming group. Zaslav received [...]

  • Jonathan Lamy RIAA

    Jonathan Lamy Stepping Down From RIAA

    Jonathan Lamy, the Recording Industry Association of America’s longtime executive VP of communications and marketing, is stepping down from his post after 17 years, he announced today. As he put it in an email to Variety, “I started back in 2002, which means it’s been 17+ years, four different RIAA CEOs, three format changes and [...]

  • Fox Layoffs

    Disney-21st Fox Layoffs: TV Divisions Brace for Deep Cuts

    A second day of layoffs has begun on the Fox lot in the wake of Disney completing its acquisition of 21st Century Fox on Wednesday. Longtime 20th Century Fox Television Distribution president Mark Kaner is among the senior executives who were formally notified with severance details on Friday morning. 21st Century Fox’s international TV sales [...]

  • anthony pellicano

    Hollywood Fixer Anthony Pellicano Released From Federal Prison

    Anthony Pellicano, the Hollywood private eye whose wiretapping case riveted the industry a decade ago, was released from a federal prison on Friday, a prison spokeswoman confirmed. Pellicano was sentenced in 2008 to 15 years, following his conviction on 78 charges of wiretapping, racketeering, conspiracy and wire fraud. He had been in custody since 2003, [...]

  • This image taken from the Twitter

    HBO’s Reaction to Trump’s ‘Game of Thrones’ Campaign

    Everyone wants a piece of the “Game of Thrones” lemon cake. From Bud Light to Red Bull the world of Westeros is open to a lot of brand partnerships, unless you’re using that iconic typeface to push a political agenda. In November of 2018 President Donald Trump unveiled a “Thrones” inspired poster with the words [...]

  • Leaving Neverland HBO

    'Leaving Neverland' Lawsuit Proves to Be a Judicial Hot Potato

    The Michael Jackson estate sued HBO last month for airing the documentary “Leaving Neverland,” which accuses the late King of Pop of serial child sexual abuse. Since then, the case has had a difficult time finding a judge to handle it. Three federal judges have recused themselves in the last week, citing potential financial conflicts [...]

  • Members of the public mourn at

    Guy Oseary’s New Zealand Fundraiser Nears $150,000, Continues Raising Money

    In the wake of the horrific shootings at New Zealand mosques last week that killed some 49 people, Maverick chief Guy Oseary launched a GoFundMe campaign to “support those affected by this tragedy at this very difficult time,” and began it with an $18,000 donation. Boosted by donations from many celebrities — including Amy Schumer, [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content