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‘It’ Loses Director Cary Fukunaga

New Line’s feature adaptation of Stephen King’s “It” has lost its director.

Cary Fukunaga has dropped out of the project as director, sources confirmed on Monday. The “True Detective” director exited the project this weekend.

“It” was set to be split up into two films, and sources say New Line was considering making only one movie due to budget concerns. Fukunaga, however, was adamant about making two pics. They could not agree on a budget, causing Fukunaga to clash with the studio.

Production was originally set to move forward this summer, but is now stalled.

It was revealed earlier this month that Will Poulter is in talks to play the evil clown Pennywise in the horror. Older actors Mark Rylance and Ben Mendelsohn were also in the mix for the role.

Fukunaga came on board to the project in 2012, when it was set up at Warner Bros. before moving to New Line. He penned the screenplay along with Chase Palmer.

Niija Kuykendall, Dave Neustadter and Walter Hamada are overseeing the movie Warner Bros. and New Line. Seth Grahame-Smith and David Katzenberg are producing through their KatzSmith banner while Dan Lin and Roy Lee are also producing.

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King’s famous 1986 novel was adapted as a TV miniseries in 1991 starring John Ritter and Tim Curry, though was never tackled as a film because of the massive size of the book. It follows a group of outcast kids who come together over summer break to take on a monster troubling their town, only to face their own personal demons in the process.

The Wrap first reported the news of Fukunaga’s exit.

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