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Mark Schultz, the real-life focus of the wrestling drama “Foxcatcher,” has removed this week’s blasts against the film and director Bennett Miller, saying, “I may have tweeted out of anger.”

But in the Jan. 1 statement on his Facebook page, in which Schultz apologizes for the “harshness of my language,” he adds, “I in no way regret standing up for myself, nor do I regret calling out the only other man who has had decision making power concerning my image and legacy these past years,” referring to Miller.

The negative tweets and Facebook post on Dec. 31 caught many people by surprise, since the Olympian has supported the film since its Cannes premiere, appearing at a half-dozen screenings, including the New York Film Festival and tweeting praise for the films, particularly the actors.

In the past weeks, Schultz has grown more ambivalent on social media, and has frequently plugged his book, which came out mid-November, “Foxcatcher: The True Story of My Brother’s Murder, John du Pont’s Madness and the Quest for Olympic Gold.”

As recently as Dec. 21, he showed this dichotomy, tweeting, “How can you not love Bennett Miller?” and “I think the actors in Foxcatcher should all win Oscars.” But that same day, he also wrote, “‘Foxcatcher’ could not have portrayed me more inaccurately if they tried” and again plugging his book.

On Dec. 31, he offered a series of tweets, often all in capital letters, blasting the film and Miller, including “Everything I’ve ever said positive about the movie I take back” and and repeating “I hate it” seven times.

His Jan. 1 statement on Facebook said: “My story and my life are real. I am a real human being. While I may have tweeted out of anger, I in no way regret standing up for myself, nor do I regret calling out the only other man who has had decision making power concerning my image and legacy these past years. I apologize for the harshness of my language, but I am firm in where I stand. I will gladly go to any lengths to protect and safeguard the integrity and truth of my story, my life, my character and my legacy. If that’s not worth fighting over while I’m still alive, I don’t know what is.”

A Dec. 30 Facebook posting had taken offense at a specific scene: “Leaving the audience with a feeling that somehow there could have been a sexual relationship between duPont and I is a sickening and insulting lie… after reading 3 or 4 reviews interpreting it sexually, and jeopardizing my legacy, they need to have a press conference to clear the air, or I will.”

Reps said that Schultz is said out of the country and unavailable for comment.

On Dec. 20, Schultz plugged his book, then tweeted “love Twitter and Facebook. I can have just as much publicity power as anyone. I may be small but I’m growing.”