×
You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

‘Crash’ Director Doesn’t Think It Deserved Best Picture Oscar

When 2005’s “Crash” won the Oscar for best picture, it had some steep competition: “Brokeback Mountain,” “Capote,” “Good Night, and Good Luck” and “Munich” all received noms that year.

After the results were read, many were shocked or angry, criticizing the Academy. “Crash’s” director Paul Haggis apparently agrees with the sentiment that it wasn’t the best film. In an interview with HitFix Tuesday, Haggis lauded the other nominated films and expressed doubt about the outcome.

“Was it the best film of the year? I don’t think so,” Haggis admitted. “There were great films that year. ‘Good Night, and Good Luck,’ amazing film. ‘Capote,’ terrific film. Ang Lee’s ‘Brokeback Mountain,’ great film. And Spielberg’s ‘Munich.’ I mean please, what a year. ‘Crash’ for some reason affected people, it touched people. And you can’t judge these films like that. I’m very glad to have those Oscars. They’re lovely things. But you shouldn’t ask me what the best film of the year was because I wouldn’t be voting for ‘Crash,’ only because I saw the artistry that was in the other films. Now however, for some reason that’s the film that touched people the most that year. So I guess that’s what they voted for, something that really touched them. And I’m very proud of the fact that ‘Crash’ does touch you. People still come up to me more than any of my films and say, ‘That film just changed my life.’ I’ve heard that dozens and dozens and dozens of times. So it did its job there. I mean I knew it was the social experiment that I wanted, so I think it’s a really good social experiment. Is it a great film? I don’t know.”

Haggis also addressed criticism about the racial components of the film.

Popular on Variety

“On ‘Crash,’ what I decided to do early on was present stereotypes for the first 30 minutes,” he said. “And then reinforce those stereotypes. And make you feel uncomfortable, then representing it to make you feel very comfortable because I say, ‘Shh, we’re in the dark. It’s fine, you can think these things. You can laugh at these people. We all know Hispanics park their cars on a lawn, and we all know that Asians can’t drive in the dark.  I know you’re a big liberal, but it’s OK, nobody’s going to see you laugh.’ As soon as I made you feel comfortable, I could very slowly start turning you around in the seat so I left you spinning as you walked out of the movie theater. That was the intent.”

“Crash” explores racial tensions in Los Angeles through interwoven stories. It was inspired by a real-life incident in which Haggis’ Porsche was stolen outside a video store in 1991.

More Film

  • Imogen Poots as Riley in "Black

    'Black Christmas': Film Review

    “Black Christmas,” a low-budget Canadian horror movie released in 1974, was a slasher thriller with a difference: It was the very first one! Okay, there were more than a few precedents, from “Psycho” (the great-granddaddy of the genre) to “The Last House on the Left” and “The Texas Chain Saw Massacre” to Mario Bava’s “A [...]

  • David Benioff, D.B. Weiss. Creators and

    'Game of Thrones' Creators to Develop H.P. Lovecraft Movie at Warner Bros.

    Following their exit from the “Star Wars” universe, “Game of Thrones” co-creators David Benioff and D.B. Weiss have found their replacement pic, signing on to produce an untitled thriller based on the graphic novel “Lovecraft” for Warner Bros. It is unknown if they will also direct the project, but they’ve already set Phil Hay and [...]

  • Little Women Greta Gerwig BTS

    Greta Gerwig and 'Little Women' Crew Mix Modern and Classical

    Greta Gerwig wrote and directed Sony’s “Little Women,” a new look at Louisa May Alcott’s much-loved 19th-century classic. Eager to pay tribute to her artisan colleagues, Gerwig says, “It was a joy for me to work with all these people. It’s a movie that’s impossible to create without world-class artists. They killed themselves for me!” [...]

  • Honey Boy

    Shia LaBeouf's 'Honey Boy' Adds Unusual Twist to Oscar's History With Kids

    Hollywood has made many terrific films about childhood, and many about filmmaking. Amazon’s “Honey Boy,” which opened Nov. 8, combines the two: A movie with a child’s POV of the industry. That unique angle could be a real benefit during awards season, and the film’s backstory — with Shia LaBeouf as the main attraction — will [...]

  • Editorial use only. No book cover

    Taiwan Opens Doors Wider to LGBTQ Content

    The door has opened wider for gay content in Taiwan since the island became the first in Asia to legalize same-sex marriage in May, and companies like CEO Jay Lin’s Portico Media are hoping to turn LGBTQ stories into good business. The firm is ramping up its development of originals on its GagaOOLala platform, Asia’s [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content