×

‘Boyhood’ Wins Best Picture at the BAFTA Awards

LONDON — BAFTA went mad about the boy on Sunday night in London, with Richard Linklater’s “Boyhood” picking up the prizes for best picture and director, as well as supporting actress.

It was a night at the Royal Opera House where almost everything went to form.

There were no surprises in the acting races, with Eddie Redmayne, Julianne Moore, J.K. Simmons and Patricia Arquette all winning — confirming their status as clear favorites for the Oscars in two weeks’ time.

As well as taking the best actor award, James Marsh’s “The Theory of Everything” made up for missing out in the best picture race by taking the award for outstanding British film and the prize for adapted screenplay.

It was a grand night for Wes Anderson’s “The Grand Budapest Hotel,” winning five awards: original screenplay, original music, makeup and hair, production design and costume design.

Neither Linklater nor Anderson were present because of a scheduling clash with the Directors Guild of America awards the previous night in Los Angeles.

Popular on Variety

“Whiplash” drummed up three laurels, adding sound and editing to the supporting actor prize.

Writer Stephen Beresford and producer David Livingstone won the BAFTA for outstanding British debut by a writer, director or producer, for their collaboration on “Pride.”

Pawel Pawlikowski’s stunning black-and-white “Ida” won best film not in the English language. This marked a unique triple for Pawlikowski, who previously won the BAFTAs for outstanding British debut (for “Last Resort”) and outstanding British film (for “My Summer of Love”). He joked that he might as well get a lifetime achievement award straight away.

“Birdman” took the cinematography prize, its only award, and one of the more unexpected winners of the night.

More predictably, “Citizenfour” won the documentary prize.

Stephen Hawking received a standing ovation for presenting the special vfx prize to “Interstellar.”

Jack O’Connell was named the BAFTA EE Rising Star, voted by the public.

As previously announced, the BAFTA for outstanding contribution to British cinema was handed to BBC Films on its 25th anniversary. Topper Christine Langan, herself a BAFTA best film winner a few years back for producing “The Queen,” accepted the honor, declaring, “British talent is simply the business.”

Richard Attenborough, the former BAFTA president who died last year, was the subject of a special tribute headlined by a heartfelt recorded message from Robert Downey Jr., who starred in Attenborough’s “Chaplin.”

Mike Leigh was honored with the BAFTA fellowship, although “Mr. Turner” failed to take any awards on the night.

See the full list of winners below.

BEST FILM
Boyhood,” Richard Linklater, Cathleen Sutherland

OUTSTANDING BRITISH FILM
“The Theory of Everything,” James Marsh, Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Lisa Bruce, Anthony Mccarten

LEADING ACTOR
Eddie Redmayne, “The Theory of Everything”

LEADING ACTRESS
Julianne Moore, “Still Alice”

DIRECTOR
“Boyhood,” Richard Linklater

SUPPORTING ACTOR
J.K. Simmons, “Whiplash”

SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Patricia Arquette, “Boyhood”

ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
“The Grand Budapest Hotel,” Wes Anderson

CINEMATOGRAPHY
“Birdman,” Emmanuel Lubezki

ANIMATED FILM
“The Lego Movie,” Phil Lord, Christopher Miller

ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
“The Theory of Everything,” Anthony Mccarten

OUTSTANDING DEBUT BY A BRITISH WRITER, DIRECTOR OR PRODUCER
Stephen Beresford (Writer), David Livingstone (Producer), “Pride”

ORIGINAL MUSIC
“The Grand Budapest Hotel,” Alexandre Desplat

DOCUMENTARY
“Citizenfour,” Laura Poitras

FILM NOT IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE
“Ida,” Pawel Pawlikowski, Eric Abraham, Piotr Dzieciol, Ewa Puszczynska

MAKE UP & HAIR
“The Grand Budapest Hotel,” Frances Hannon

COSTUME DESIGN
“The Grand Budapest Hotel,” Milena Canonero

PRODUCTION DESIGN
“The Grand Budapest Hotel,” Adam Stockhausen, Anna Pinnock

BRITISH SHORT ANIMATION
“The Bigger Picture,” Chris Hees, Daisy Jacobs, Jennifer Majka

EDITING
“Whiplash,” Tom Cross

SOUND
“Whiplash,” Thomas Curley, Ben Wilkins, Craig Mann

SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS
“Interstellar,” Paul Franklin, Scott Fisher, Andrew Lockley

THE EE RISING STAR AWARD (VOTED FOR BY THE PUBLIC)
Jack O’Connell

More Film

  • Liselott Forsman

    Nordisk Film & TV Fond Boasts Record Budget for 2020

    As the Nordisk Film & TV Fond prepares to celebrates its 30th anniversary, at this month’s Göteborg Film Festival, CEO Liselott Forsman has outlined her vision for the upcoming yearm which sees the fund boasting a record high budget of NOK 127 million ($12.8 million), up from last year’s total of NOK 97.75 million ($11.4 [...]

  • CNC Chief Outlines Plan to Update

    CNC Chief Outlines Plan to Update French Production Infrastructure

    Speaking at an industry round-table at the Paris-based Production Forum on Thursday, Dominique Boutonnat, president of France’s National Film Board (CNC), announced a new plan to update local production studios in order to make them more internationally competitive. The modest plan, which involves new funding, training sessions and additional research, follows a March 2019 report, [...]

  • Bait

    ‘Bait’ Director Mark Jenkin Sets Next Feature With Film4

    Writer-director Mark Jenkin, whose feature debut “Bait” was nominated for two BAFTAs last week, has set his next project, “Enys Men” (“Stone Island”), with Film4. Jenkin will direct from his own script. Denzil Monk is producing for Bosena. Johnny Fewings is executive producing, with Kate Byers and Linn Waite as associate producers. Film4 will co-finance the [...]

  • CineAsia

    CineAsia Turns its Back on Hong Kong

    CineAsia, the long-running convention for the film exhibition and distribution sectors, has ditched Hong Kong, its home for the past decade. It was forced to cancel the 2019 edition in December, due to the political unrest in the city. New York-based organizer, the Film Expo Group, announced on Friday by email that the 2020 edition [...]

  • Mama Weed

    New Films With Catherine Deneuve, Isabelle Huppert, Omar Sy Unspool at UniFrance Rendez-Vous

    Showcasing the wide scope and many nuances of French comedies, Oscar-winning director Michel Hazanavicius’s “The Lost Prince,” “Mama Weed” with Isabelle Huppert (pictured), “The Lion” with Dany Boon, and “Welcome to the Jungle” with Catherine Deneuve are having their market premieres at the 22nd edition of the UniFrance Rendez-Vous with French Cinema in Paris, which [...]

  • VHYes

    'VHYes': Film Review

    Its slim premise involving a couple of 13-year-old boys having fun with a camcorder in the late ’80s, “VHYes” is maybe a little too faithful to their sensibility — being exactly what a kid raised on “Saturday Night Live,” “SCTV,” and maybe cable broadcasts of “Kentucky Fried Movie” would imagine as the coolest home-made movie [...]

  • The Wave

    'The Wave': Film Review

    A sort of “After Hours” update with a lot more drugs and time ellipses, “The Wave” throws Justin Long down a rabbit’s hole of sometimes hallucinatory, sometimes mortal peril when his button-down protagonist makes the mistake of celebrating a career breakthrough a little too adventurously. This surreal comedy from debuting feature director Gille Klabin and [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content