×

From weighty discussions of world events to squeals over sartorial hits and misses, red carpet conversations are always so unpredictable. Here are some highlights of Variety‘s chats outside the Beverly Hilton on Sunday:

“The Affair” co-creator Sarah Treem says there was a clear generational divide in the overall reaction to the Showtime drama about marital infidelity, particularly from women. “Women under 20 couldn’t understand why she should leave Joshua Jackson and women over 30 were like, ‘Where is Dominic West?’” As for the debate stirred by the whodunit finale of the series, Treem said she was “stunned.” “That’s a longer conversation,” she advised when asked to elaborate. (It may be an even longer conversation now that the show bagged the best drama trophy.)

Meanwhile, Maura Tierney said she doesn’t know where the murder-related storyline is going “and I didn’t ask.” The actress said she was grateful to have the chance to play a character who changed so much over the course of the season, even if it was hard to play. “I find her very pathetic” by season’s end, Tierney said. “She doesn’t know what else to do.”

***

Allison Tolman has been busy setting up TV guest shots and movie roles since she broke out in “Fargo” last year. But she admits to being a little jealous now that Kirsten Dunst, Jesse Plemons, Nick Offerman and others have been set for season two. “I wish I was able to go play with those guys,” she joked.
“Fargo” bosses Noah Hawley and Warren Littlefield weren’t far behind Tolman on the carpet. Despite the fact that working on “Fargo” means working in frigid conditions up north, it wasn’t hard to lineup an all-star cast for season two, which begins shooting next week. “Season one was a big sales tool,” Littlefield said. “A lot of people called us and said, “What do we have to do to be in it? We don’t care if it’s 40 degrees below zero in Calgary. We want to spend the winter with you,” Littlefield said.

***

James Corden, “Into the Woods” star and future CBS latenight host, admitted to being a bit dazzled by the swirl that he’s in amid award season and the March 23 premiere of “The Late Late Show with James Corden.” “Lower your expectations,” he deadpanned. “Most things in TV are bad, you know.”

***

“Jane the Virgin” cast members were out in force on Sunday. Justin Baldoni and Brett Dier were palling around to the delight of fans of Team Rafael and Team Michael. The CW dramedy has earned many laurels from critics who have noted the difficult task that exec producer Jennie Snyder Urman had in keeping it from becoming a caricature of telenovela-style storytelling. Her answer: “We take the characters and their emotional seriously. Their emotional life grounds the show.”

***

Jeff Wachtel, chief content officer at NBCUniversal Cable Entertainment, said that in a sea of great television these days, two accomplishments stand out in his mind. “Homeland,” for showing “it’s possible to reinvent a show midstream.” And Fox’s “Empire,” for “proving that show that looks like it might be niche can still go big.”

***

It’s a high-class problem. How does a network exec decide who to root for when they have more than one nominee in a category? Showtime brass are in that predicament this year. “I just hope we don’t go home empty-handed — that’s my only hope,” said David Nevins. Added Matt Blank: “It’s very hard. I’m just happy that all our children get to be here with us.”

***

The media and entertainment biz has been through a rough few weeks, from the cyber attack on Sony Pictures to the Charlie Hedbo killings in Paris — al revolving . The events have highlighted vulnerabilities in a world that is more digitally connected than ever before. But Netflix chief content officer Ted Sarandos said the company is unbowed in its effort to expand and explore provocative subjects. Noting that Netflix has funded a wide range of documentaries, “there’s something for everyone to be angry about in that whole pool,” he said.

Patricia Arquette, meanwhile, is on the cutting edge as she is about to star as a cyber-crime expert in the CBS drama “CSI: Cyber.” “That’s part of the reason I took the role” in “Cyber,” Arquette said an hour before she bagged a Globe for “Boyhood.”

“We all have some many of these devices and we don’t really know what the hell’s going on with them,” she said. “I think we’re just going to see more of this kind of crime.”