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Surprise ‘Pride’ Marches Into Golden Globes Race

The Golden Globes nomination for “Pride” is similar to the tale it depicts: unlikely but true.

It was barely on the radar for many awards pundits. But audiences have loved it since it debuted at Cannes and played at the Toronto Film Festival.

Pride” tells the true story of Britain’s 1984-85 strike by the National Union of Mineworkers. The miners’ families were hurting, so an organization was formed to help, Lesbians & Gays Support the Miners. The new group felt a kinship with the miners, since both were feeling oppressed by the Margaret Thatcher government, the police and the tabloid press.

Variety‘s Charles Gant hailed the film as an “irresistible crowd-pleaser.”

CBS Films president Terry Press told Variety on Thursday, “We’re really proud of the movie. It’s important to us that people see it. It was one of the surprises at Toronto; audiences really loved it. And so did they HFPA. We did multiple screenings and sent them screeners.”

At Toronto, vet actor Bill Nighy told Variety that he’s as proud of this film as of anything he’s done. Nighy said the two most significant events of his lifetime are the 1960s civil-rights movement, and the current acceptance of gay marriage, so it was “special” to him to have an opportunity to work on a film that dealt with equal rights.

CBS Films opened it domestically Sept. 26, earning $1.4 million domestically. The pic has another $6 million internationally.

In a statement Thursday, scripter Stephen Beresford said, “It’s a very funny story but also a very powerful one — and one which the real people involved feared would die with them. All of us involved with ‘Pride’ are thrilled by this nomination, not least because these real-life lost heroes are finally getting the recognition they deserve.”

Producer David Livingstone added, “Thank you so much to the Hollywood Foreign Press Association for all of the support for this film. This nomination is a tribute to everyone involved. The cast, the crew, our amazing writer Stephen Beresford and brilliant director Matthew Warchus. But it’s also down to the people on whom this incredible funny and true story is based. It’s a wonderful moment.”

The film marks CBS Films’ third Globes nominee for best picture, after “Inside Llewyn Davis” and “Salmon Fishing in the Yemen.”

 

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