×

Buta

A countryside schoolboy tries to stand up against an albino bully in the charming and gorgeously assembled "Buta," this year's foreign-language Oscar submission from Azerbaijan. The titular orphan is named after the paisley shape that finds its way into both the carpet he receives for his birthday and an enormous stone monument he's constructing on a scenic mountaintop. This naturally acted contempo fable has been making the fest rounds, and will also appeal to tube buyers looking for exotic, G-rated fare.

With:
With: Rafig Guliyev, Tofig Aliyev, Elnur Karimov, Laman Naviyeva, Arzu Isayeva, Bahadur Sefiyev.

A countryside schoolboy tries to stand up against an albino bully in the charming and gorgeously assembled “Buta,” this year’s foreign-language Oscar submission from Azerbaijan. The titular orphan is named after the paisley shape that finds its way into both the carpet he receives for his birthday and an enormous stone monument he’s constructing on a scenic mountaintop. This naturally acted contempo fable has been making the fest rounds, and will also appeal to tube buyers looking for exotic, G-rated fare.

Pint-sized Buta (Rafig Guliyev) might be far too small for the hand-me-down shirt he’s wearing, but he’s not afraid to stand up for himself. Scribe-helmer Ilgar Najaf uses the protag’s symbolic name as the binding element of several related stories that elegantly blend light comedy and equally light drama, offering an almost fairy-tale-naive if never quite moralizing look at love, family and village life in rural Azerbaijan. Javnshir Guliyev’s score, alternating between delicate flutes and more melancholy wind instruments, helps underline the emotions, while Giorgi Beridze’s supple camerawork, featuring many helicopter shots, drinks in the scenic landscapes, especially in the pic’s breathtaking finale.

More Reviews

  • My Salinger Year

    'My Salinger Year': Film Review

    A writer writes, but there’s no evidence that Joanna Rakoff can even type when she takes the job as an assistant working for literary agent Phyllis Westberg in “My Salinger Year.” Because Rakoff went on to pen a book-length memoir about her time working for Westberg, who represented reclusive writer J.D. Salinger, we can rest [...]

  • Gentefied Netflix

    'Gentefied' on Netflix: TV Review

    The Los Angeles that TV and movies portray is rarely, as anyone who’s actually from Los Angeles can tell you, particularly accurate to life there outside the entertainment industry. The sprawling city is dense with its own culture, much of which, thanks to sharp influxes money and new (whiter) residents, is perpetually in danger of [...]

  • The Night Clerk

    'The Night Clerk': Film Review

    In “The Night Clerk,” Tye Sheridan and a very busy Ana de Armas star as a hotel clerk with Asperger’s and the solicitous beauty who shows up after a murder. The chemistry between Sheridan and de Armas is involving. The casting of Helen Hunt as a enabling mother and John Leguizamo as a police detective [...]

  • A still from Rebuilding Paradise by

    'Rebuilding Paradise': Film Review

    Ron Howard, over the last decade, has directed a handful of documentaries (all of them about popular musicians), and maybe it’s no surprise that he has turned out to be an ace craftsman of the nonfiction form. But “Rebuilding Paradise,” which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival, is a different kind of Ron Howard documentary, [...]

  • Beasts Clawing at Straws Review

    'Beasts Clawing at Straws': Film Review

    Cheap gangsters, duplicitous dragon ladies, a mute tattooed assassin, get-rich-quick schlubs looking to score and a comical detective: “Beasts Clawing at Straws” could just as well be called “Beasts Toying with Clichés” if it weren’t such an amusing, echt Korean romp. Debuting director Kim Yong-hoon acknowledges a certain “Fargo” influence, but there’s also a hint [...]

  • A still from The Earth Is

    'The Earth Is Blue as an Orange': Film Review

    “Everybody smile and say ‘cinema,'” young Myroslava Trofymchuk instructs several Ukrainian soldiers, as they obligingly pose and perform for her camera, their brawny tank reduced to a prop in the rubbly, wintry background. It’s the only time we see the masculine agents of conflict in “The Earth Is Blue as an Orange,” a documentary with [...]

  • Cambodian Rock Band interview

    Listen: How 'Cambodian Rock Band' Became One of the Most Produced Plays in the U.S.

    One of the hottest trends in American theater this season is Cambodian surf rock from the 1970s — and that’s thanks to “Cambodian Rock Band.” Listen to this week’s Stagecraft podcast below: Playwright Lauren Yee’s genre-bending stage show, part family drama and part rock concert, has become one of the most-produced plays in the U.S. this season. [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content