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Broadway’s ‘Ann,’ Starring Holland Taylor, to Close Early

She had nominated for a Tony but went home empty-handed

Broadway playAnn,” the solo show written by and starring Holland Taylor, has moved up its closing date with the production now scheduled to close at the end of the month.

TV and bigscreen vet Taylor (“Two and a Half Men,” “The Practice”) had been nominated for a Tony for her performance in the bio about late Texas Gov. Ann Richards, but the kudo went to Cicely Tyson in “The Trip to Bountiful.” With no trophy to help prod sales, producers — led by Bob Boyett and Harriet Newman Leve — opted to close the show a couple of months before the original end date of Sept. 1.

Since “Ann” began perfs in February, weekly grosses have never cracked the $400,000 mark, and for the past couple of the months the show has been playing to auds that have averaged less than 50% of capacity. With only one actor and relatively simple set demands, the production didn’t have particularly high running costs, but it still seems unlikely that the Broadway incarnation will have recouped its capitalization by the time it shutters.

Taylor has been working on the stage project, directed by Benjamin Endsley Klein, for more than five years. The show opened in Galveston, Texas, in 2010 and played a couple of more stops in that state before going on to stints in Chicago and Washington, D.C.

No further plans for the play have been announced, but future stints for “Ann” remain a possibility. Show shutters June 30 at Lincoln Center Theater’s Vivian Beaumont Theater.

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