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Broadway Box Office: ‘Glass Menagerie’ Sparkles After Strong Reviews

Zachary Quinto starrer stands out in a mostly static week; 'Spider-Man' continues to freefall

Spurred by largely stellar reviews in the wake of its Sept. 26 opening, the Broadway revival of “The Glass Menagerie” posted the largest individual jump of the week at the Broadway box office, climbing more than $85,000 (or 20%) to top $500,000.

The rise at “Menagerie” ($511,429), toplined by Zachary Quinto, stood out in large part because there was very little action at the Rialto B.O. last week, with the annual fall recovery from the post-Labor Day slump stalling a bit as some shows rose a bit, some dipped and overall cume held steady.

One likely contributor to the standstill was the annual general debate of the United Nations General Assembly, an event that tends to fill up local hotels with diplomats rather than theatergoing tourists.

Also highlighted amid the overall stasis: the $100,000 drop at “Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark” ($621,960), continuing a freefall that began a month ago. It’s enough to make legiters start to question just when the Foxwoods Theater will be up for grabs, although it remains to be seen how much of a recovery the tuner will make when tourists return to town in force closer to the holiday season.

Pulling in $441,059, “Annie” also struggled to turn consumers’ heads.

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At the top of the charts, “The Lion King” ($1,710,914) wrestled the No. 1 slot away from “The Book of Mormon” ($1,699,204), ahead of “Kinky Boots” ($1,604,362) and “Wicked” ($1,467,774).

Add in “Motown” ($1,384,216) and “Matilda” ($1,148,640), and that makes six members of the millionaires’ club. But after that, the drop is a steep one: Next up after “Matilda” in the top 10 was “Pippin,” ringing in $888,583.

With Broadway’s numbers relatively low compared to the boom times of summer, “Big Fish” ($736,722) gained further momentum in the run-up to its Oct. 6 opening and entered the top 10 for the first time.

Big Fish” is one of four titles currently in previews, with “A Night With Janis Joplin” ($271,564, in its first week of eight previews) and “The Winslow Boy” ($166,477, ditto) also joined by “A Time to Kill” ($54,952 for one preview), playing a single initial perf. Recent opener “Romeo and Juliet” ($450,894) was down, as was August opener “First Date” ($306,593).

Overall Broadway cume came in at $19.5 million for 26 shows, a tally almost exactly on par with the prior frame. Attendance upticked by a minute 2,500 to 197,906, but average price paid per ticket, a reliable indicator of overall demand, slipped $1.50 to $98.30.

The Main Stem’s climb to more robust numbers should pick up in the coming weeks as more and more fall shows join the fray and then the approaching holidays start to bring the tourists back to town.

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