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Film Review: ‘Delivery Man’

As the world’s most fertile sperm donor, Vince Vaughn winningly plays someone who’s overwhelmed, as opposed to merely overwhelming.

With:

Vince Vaughn, Chris Pratt, Cobie Smulders, Andrzej Blumenfeld, Simon Delaney, Bobby Moynihan, Dave Patten, Adam Chanler-Berat, Britt Robertson, Jack Reynor, Amos VanDerPoel, Matthew Daddario, Jessica Williams, Leslie Ann Glossner, Derrick Arthur, Michael Oberholtzer, Sebastien Rene. (English, Spanish dialogue)

In the 17 years since “Swingers,” Vince Vaughn has cultivated the comedic persona of an obnoxious and insensitive boor, so it may come as a surprise to learn that “Delivery Man” reveals a softer side entirely. As David Wozniak, the world’s most fertile sperm donor, the star plays someone who’s overwhelmed as opposed to merely overwhelming. It’s a welcome change, though a significant marketing challenge as well, considering DreamWorks has almost no way of letting audiences know that “Delivery Man” is virtually nothing like a Vince Vaughn movie, but rather a heartfelt celebration of the act of parenthood presented under radically exaggerated circumstances.

Such sincerity comes easy for Canadian writer-director Ken Scott, who’s already told this story once before in the charming French-language hit “Starbuck.” Now, working in Hollywood, he demonstrates the good sense not to mess with success, engineering what amounts to a scene-for-scene remake of that earlier feel-good outing — with the notable addition of Chris Pratt in his funniest supporting performance yet.

Transplanted from Montreal to Manhattan for the benefit of this new version, Wozniak drives a deli-meat truck, but even that task proves too much responsibility for his stunted abilities. Vaughn’s character may not be the sharpest blade in the family butchery, but he has a good soul, which comes through the instant he receives news that would send any normal man into panic mode.

Nearly 20 years earlier, he donated dozens of times to a fertility clinic, which, through an administrative fluke, used his sperm to foster 533 children, 142 of whom are demanding to know the identity of their biological father. More shocking for Wozniak is the revelation that his policewoman g.f. (Cobie Smulders) is pregnant, though neither revelation is particularly easy to process for a man who grows marijuana in his apartment and has more parking tickets than dollars to his name.

Presented with a packet of information about his children, Wozniak draws one page at random and decides to pay the kid a visit, eavesdropping on a professional basketball game where his son scores the winning shot. For a split second, the film allows audiences to think that perhaps this sub-average shlub could be responsible for fathering 533 exceptional offspring: a mix of athletes, stars and world leaders.

That’s the beauty of Scott’s script, which supplies precisely the emotional uplift moviegoers want, while still managing to surprise at every turn. The circumstances may be contrived, but the characters feel refreshingly genuine. It’s a testament to the director’s talent that the chemistry works equally well with two entirely different ensembles, while casting director Jeanne McCarthy has uncovered such talented young thesps as Britt Robertson and Jack Reynor for the English-language version.

“Delivery Man” skips over all the diaper changes and sleepless nights and gets to the essence of parenthood, when fathers must learn to put aside their preconceived expectations and accept their children for who they are. Life is well under way for most of them when Wozniak enters into the picture, and the movie celebrates the diversity of possibility, presenting him with offspring of all colors and personalities. The film observes tenderly as he goes to visit one son in a home for the severely disabled (Sebastien Rene represents the pic’s the lone case of repeat casting) and provides an unexpected chuckle when he discovers that another is gay.

That scene leads to the film’s biggest surprise — a perfectly conceived moment set at a conference that steers what could have settled for farce into far deeper territory. Where so many laffers rush to dismiss raw emotion with an ironic wink, Scott isn’t afraid to get sentimental. In fact, he embraces the possibility, serving up a film that overflows with touching moments between a father and the children he never knew.

Each and every subplot either supplies its own life lesson or serves to reinforce the pic’s upbeat view of fatherhood, from the sacrifices Wozniak’s immigrant dad (gifted Polish actor Andrzej Blumenfeld, who has worked with such greats as Polanski and Kieslowski) made for his family to the way his kid brother (Bobby Moynihan) boasts about his newborn’s bowel movements. None can compete with Pratt, however, who plays Wozniak’s best friend, a buffoon of a lawyer who can barely manage his four young kids — tiny terrors who, he recklessly insists, “know they’re too old to get an abortion.”

It would be no stretch at all to interpret “Delivery Man” as a pro-life movie, illustrating as it does the miraculous range of individual personalities that can result from the same set of paternal genes, each one special in its own way. But Scott’s warm-hearted humanism extends further than family, as if to remind that we are all brothers and sisters, with more in common than could possibly separate us. Even if your soul can’t stand the thought of Vince Vaughn at the center of a 143-person group hug, there’s no denying this marks a turning point for the star. With Scott’s help, he has delivered a rare and special package indeed.

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Film Review: 'Delivery Man'

Reviewed at Walt Disney Studios, Burbank, Calif., Oct. 29, 2013. MPAA Rating: PG-13. Running time: 105 MIN.

Production:

A Walt Disney Studios Motion Picture release of a DreamWorks Pictures, Reliance Entertainment present an Andre Rouleau production. Produced by Rouleau.

Crew:

Directed, written by Ken Scott, based on his original screenplay “Starbuck.” Camera (Deluxe color, Panavision widescreen), Eric Edwards; editor, Priscilla Nedd Friendly; music, Jon Brion; music supervisors, Jonathan Karp, Dana Sano; production designer, Ida Random; art director, Mark Newell; set decorator, Sara Parks; costume designer, Melissa Toth; sound (Dolby Digital/SDDS/Datasat), Tom Nelson; supervising sound editor, Per Hallberg; re-recording mixers, Scott Millan, Greg P. Russell; special effects coordinator, Drew Jiritano; visual effects supervisors, Eran Dinur, Eli Jarra; visual effects producers, Richard Friedlander, Glenn Allen; visual effects, Brainstorm Digital, Technicolor; stunt coordinator, Joseph Bucaro; associate producer, Maxime Vanasse; casting, Jeanne McCarthy.

With:

Vince Vaughn, Chris Pratt, Cobie Smulders, Andrzej Blumenfeld, Simon Delaney, Bobby Moynihan, Dave Patten, Adam Chanler-Berat, Britt Robertson, Jack Reynor, Amos VanDerPoel, Matthew Daddario, Jessica Williams, Leslie Ann Glossner, Derrick Arthur, Michael Oberholtzer, Sebastien Rene. (English, Spanish dialogue)

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