×
You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

Film Review: ‘Dark Tourist’

Michael Cudlitz's first leading role is the sole selling point of this repellent character study.

With:

Michael Cudlitz, Melanie Griffith, Pruitt Taylor Vince, Suzanne Quast.

Character actor Michael Cudlitz’s first leading role is the sole selling point of “Dark Tourist,” a well-acted but rote and ultimately repellent character study of a psychologically disturbed loner. Bleak and ponderous picture feels much longer than its 80-minute running time and manages none of the lurid pull of its varied influences, including “Taxi Driver,” “Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer” and “The Crying Game.” Unsurprisingly, limited theatrical exposure was a dead end, while simultaneous VOD release seems a better bet to attract feel-bad junkies.

Yonkers security guard Jim Tahna (Cudlitz) visits the rural California hometown of one of his favorite killers, Carl Marznap (Pruitt Taylor Vince), and forges disquieting bonds with two locals: a widowed waitress (Melanie Griffith, a warm, welcome presence) and a seductive prostitute (Suzanne Quast, credible in a physically demanding role). Director Suri Krishnamma (“A Man of No Importance”) and actor-turned-writer Frank John Hughes adopt a serious-minded approach to potentially exploitative material, opting for escalating dread over graphic violence as Jim retraces Carl’s steps. Yet the lack of any deeper insight or meaning shines through in the abundance of expository voiceover and predictable, simplistic payoff.

Popular on Variety

Film Review: 'Dark Tourist'

Reviewed online, West Hollywood, Aug. 30, 2013. Running time: 80 MIN.

Production:

A Phase 4 Films release of a Vision Entertainment Group presentation in association with Suzanne DeLaurentiis Prods. and House of Huge. Produced by Zachery Bryan, Adam Targum, Suzanne DeLaurentiis, Michael Cudlitz, Frank John Hughes. Executive producer, Rick Matros. Co-producers, Stephen Fromkin, Ivan Kavalsky.

Crew:

Directed by Suri Krishnamma. Screenplay, Frank John Hughes. Camera (color), Ricardo Jacques Gale; editor, Justin Guerrieri; music, Austin Wintory; production designer, Gershom Hyldreth; set decorator, Yuki Nakamura; costume designer, Maria Lorenzana; sound, Alexander X. Hutchinson; supervising sound editors, John W. Frost, Patrick O. Bird; re-recording mixer, Frost; visual effects, KromA; stunt coordinator, Cole McKay; line producer, Jude Tucker; associate producer, Mark Holder, Alex Matros; assistant director, Antonio Grana; casting, Dori Zuckerman, Lorna Johnson.

With:

Michael Cudlitz, Melanie Griffith, Pruitt Taylor Vince, Suzanne Quast.

More Film

  • Little Mermaid

    'The Little Mermaid' Turns 30: Inside the Rocky Journey to Make a Disney Classic

    “The Little Mermaid” wasn’t just an animated classic. It was a life raft of sorts for struggling Walt Disney Studios. It’s hard to believe given how dominant Disney is today in the family entertainment space, but when the story of Ariel, a mermaid princess who just wanted to be part of Prince Eric’s world, hit [...]

  • Sylvester Stallone and Burgess Meredith in

    MGM Buying '40 Years of Rocky' to Air on Epix (EXCLUSIVE)

    Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer is wrapping up a deal to acquire “40 Years of Rocky: The Birth of a Classic,” Variety has learned. The studio plans to run the documentary, which includes behind-the-scenes footage of the creation of the first film in the franchise, on Epix, the cable channel it co-owns. The initial plan was to begin airing [...]

  • DUMBO US 1941. Photo by: Mary

    Disney Plus Warns Users Older Movies Have 'Outdated Cultural Depictions'

    The newly launched Disney Plus has no shortage of content, ranging from original animated classics to live-action remakes and “Star Wars” offshoot “The Mandalorian.” With that deep library, Disney is offering a warning that some of the streaming platform’s older content has “outdated cultural depictions.” Films like “Dumbo,” “The Aristocats,” “Lady and the Tramp” and [...]

  • 'Lost in London' film rehearsals, at

    AFM: Germany's Tiberius Acquires Woody Harrelson's Comedy 'Lost in London' (EXCLUSIVE)

    German distributor Tiberius Film has acquired the local rights to Woody Harrelson’s comedy “Lost in London” at the American Film Market, as well as two films from Russian producer Central Partnership – action movie “The Ninth” and horror thriller “The Widow.” “Lost in London,” Harrelson’s directorial debut, was experimental. It was shot over a single [...]

  • Coming to America

    Eddie Murphy on Making 'Coming to America' Sequel: 'I'm Just Over the Moon'

    Eddie Murphy revealed how he chose his “Dolemite Is My Name” director Craig Brewer to helm his “Coming to America” sequel. Murphy, who starred in and created the story for the original 1988 romantic comedy, chatted about “Coming to America” — and much more — with former co-star Antonio Banderas for “Variety Studio: Actors on [...]

  • Antonio Banderas Actors on Actors

    Antonio Banderas Reveals How His Priorities Changed After His Heart Attack

    Antonio Banderas used his recent heart attack to fuel his performance in Pedro Almodóvar’s film “Pain and Glory.” Banderas — who suffered a cardiac arrest two years ago — discussed how it fueled his performances and changed his priorities during a conversation with former co-star Eddie Murphy (“Dolemite Is My Name”) for “Variety Studio: Actors [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content