×
You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

Cannes Festival Review: ‘3X3D’

Little more than a clumsy vanity commission to celebrate Guimaraes as the European Capital of Culture.

With:

Keith Davis, Leonor Keil, Angela Marques, Nuno Melo, Jorge Prendas, Miguel Monteiro. (English, French, Portuguese dialogue)

In order to thrive, stereoscopic cinema desperately needs some wild, artistic directors to jump in and experiment with the format, and so the prospect of a portmanteau film featuring 3D shorts by Peter Greenaway, Jean-Luc Godard and Edgar Pera is reason enough to get excited. Alas, the enthusiasm dies there, as “3X3D” amounts to little more than a vanity commission to celebrate the EU selecting Guimaraes, Portugal, as its European Capital of Culture for 2012. Too narrowly targeted to generate much interest abroad, this disappointing group effort won’t travel much beyond Guimaraes, except to wrap the Critics’ Week at Cannes.

Open to sampling the new technology, Greenaway has the most fun with the format, playing with split-screen, transitions, floating text and visual effects as he does circles around Guimaraes’ sprawling Palace of the Dukes of Braganza. Actors dressed as key figures associated with the city appear around various corners, accompanied by floating (yet barely legible) blocks of text, as the image shifts back and forth between practical photography and CGI. Instead of having Greenaway deliver what looks like a low-end educational filmstrip, it would have been entertaining to see the director re-create a small historical scene of mini-narrative. The result, called “Just in Time,” barely improves upon stock museum slideshows.

Godard, by contrast, makes only the slightest gesture to embrace 3D, sarcastically dubbing his film “The Three Disasters” (a pun on 3D that would make an apt alternate title for the whole omnibus). Instead, he engages with the very concept of 3D, challenging the tradition of perspective in the fine arts and wondering what will become of films shot flat. Operating in roughly the same cheeky cine-essay form selected for “Film Socialisme” and “Histoire(s) du Cinema,” he juggles unsourced 2D film clips, archival footage and shots of a stereoscopic digital camera filming itself in the mirror, while giant keywords flash across the screen.

If Godard’s entry errs on the side of inscrutability, then Pera’s “Cinesapiens” loses points for sheer obviousness. Beating audiences over the head with Film Studies 101 concepts about the tension between realism and fantasy, the least known of the three directors assembles a crowd in a Guimaraes movie house and has them face the camera, suggesting that these “spectator-believers” are sitting on the opposite side of the screen watching us. When not chiding the hollow artificiality of Hollywood films, this tacky lecture likens moviegoing to Plato’s Allegory of the Cave, while trying to pin down spectators’ ideal role in what they watch. The winners in Pera’s debate were the many who walked out early.

Cannes Festival Review: '3X3D'

Reviewed at Cannes Film Festival (Critics’ Week, closer), May 23, 2013. Running time: 69 MIN.

Production:

(Poland) A Guimaraes presentation of a Fundacao Cidade de Guimaraes in association with Luperpedia Foundation, L’Atelieer, Bando a Parte. (International sales: Urban Distribution Intl., Montreuil, France.) Produced by Rodrigo Areias.

Crew:

Directed, written by Peter Greenaway, Jean-Luc Godard, Edgar Pera. Camera (color/B&W, HD, 3D), Reinier Van Bruemen, Luis Branquinho; editor, Raphael Lefevre, music, Jorge Prendas; production designer, Ricardo Preto; sound, Pedro Adamstor, Pedro Marinho.

With:

Keith Davis, Leonor Keil, Angela Marques, Nuno Melo, Jorge Prendas, Miguel Monteiro. (English, French, Portuguese dialogue)

More Film

  • BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY

    Korea Box Office: 'Rhapsody' Reclaims Top Spot, Beats ‘Spider-Verse’

    “Bohemian Rhapsody” reclaimed top place at the South Korean box office, overtaking “Default,” after spending two weekends in second place. The Fox release earned $4.38 million from 554,000 admissions for a total of $61.0 million from 7.94 million admissions. In its seventh weekend of release “Rhapsody” accounted for 27% of the weekend box office. CJ [...]

  • China Box Office: ‘Totoro’ Triumphant as

    China Box Office: ‘Totoro’ Triumphant as ‘Aquaman’ Defies Newcomers

    “Aquaman” comfortably dominated the Chinese box office for the second weekend. It dropped 47% in its second week, but again accounted for the majority of all cinema business nationwide. The watery superhero movie earned $53.9 million, according to data from exhibition and distribution consultancy Artisan Gateway. It played on some 25,000 screens, or nearly half [...]

  • Aquaman 2018

    'Aquaman' Crosses $250 Million at Foreign Box Office

    Things are going swimmingly at the box office for “Aquaman” as the Warner Bros.’ superhero flick hits another major milestone overseas. James Wan’s take on the ruler of the seven seas just passed $250 million internationally, and a weekend haul of $126.4 million from 43 territories brings its foreign tally to $261.3 million. “Aquaman” — [...]

  • Mortal Engines

    'Mortal Engines' to Lose More Than $100 Million at Box Office

    “Mortal Engines,” a steampunk fantasy adventure, is also an epic flop. With a budget of just over $100 million and tens of millions in global marketing costs, executives at rival studios estimate that the movie will lose upwards of $100 million. Some even project that number could float to more than $125 million. “Mortal Engines” [...]

  • Thierry Frémaux, José Luis Rebordinos Honored

    Thierry Frémaux, José Luis Rebordinos Named Honorary Argentine Academy Members

    BUENOS AIRES — In a ceremony just before Friday’s prize announcements at Ventana Sur, Cannes chief Thierry Frémaux and José Luis Rebordinos, director of the San Sebastian Festival, were named honorary members of Argentina’s Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, in a new move for the Academy, out through by its new president, Bernardo [...]

  • Nona

    Film Review: 'Nona'

    Twenty years and 12 features down the line, it’s still hard to peg the directorial sensibility of Michael Polish, with or without the presence of brother Mark as frequent co-writer and actor. His output has been all over the place, from early Lynchian quirkfests to the very middle-of-the-road inspirational dramedy “The Astronaut Farmer,” not to [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content