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Will Forte, Tim Robbins make ‘The Switch’

Actors replace Ty Burrell and Dennis Quaid in adaptation of Elmore Leonard novel

Writer-director Dan Schechter’s untitled feature adaptation of Elmore Leonard’s 1978 crime novel “The Switch” is switching up its cast, as “Saturday Night Live” veteran Will Forte and Oscar winner Tim Robbins have signed on to replace Ty Burrell and Dennis Quaid.

Duo joins John Hawkes, Yasiin Bey (formerly Mos Def), Jennifer Aniston and Isla Fisher.

Crime drama, which will serve as a prequel to Quentin Tarantino’s “Jackie Brown,” stars Hawkes and Bey as younger versions of Robert De Niro and Samuel L. Jackson’s characters Louis Gara and Ordell Robbie, who also appear in Leonard’s novel “Rum Punch.”

Set 15 years before the events in “Jackie Brown,” story follows career criminals Ordell and Louis as they team up to kidnap Mickey Dawson (Aniston), the wife of a corrupt real estate developer (Robbins). When the husband refuses to pay the ransom for his wife’s return, the ex-cons are forced to reconceive their plan, and the angry housewife uses them to get her revenge.

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Forte, who just wrapped the lead role in Alexander Payne’s “Nebraska,” will play Marshall Taylor, a married country club member who harbors a crush on Mickey and spends most of the film in a moral dilemma after witnessing her kidnapping.

The Gotham Group’s Ellen Goldsmith-Vein and Lee Stollman are producing with Liz Destro, Jordan Kessler, Michael Siegel and Leonard, while Jim Garavente will exec produce. Production will start next month.

Forte appeared in four 2012 comedies, including “That’s My Boy,” “The Watch,” “Rock of Ages” and “Tim and Eric’s Billion Dollar Movie,” and he’ll next be seen as a male cheerleader in “Grown Ups 2.” “Nebraska,” which marks Forte’s first dramatic turn, pairs the funnyman with Bruce Dern in a father-son road trip movie that Paramount will release later this year.

Robbins, who just upped his international profile with a starring turn opposite Adrien Brody in the Chinese pic “Back to 1942,” will next be seen as a recovering sex addict in Stuart Blumberg’s dramedy “Thanks for Sharing.” The “Mystic River” thesp is also set to direct and star in the dysfunctional family comedy “Man Under” with Michelle Pfeiffer and Chloe Moretz.

UTA reps Forte and Robbins, who respectively managed by Mosaic and 3 Arts Entertainment.

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