×
You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

Jean Renoir’s ‘Beast’ Restored for French Release

Studiocanal will release the classic 1938 pic in November hoping to attract a younger generation

Buoyed by the extraordinary success of “Le Roi et l’oiseau,” Studiocanal will give a theatrical opening in France to its latest restored film classic, Jean Renoir’s “La Bete Humaine” (The Human Beast). A pristine print world premieres in Venice Classics today.
Based on Emile Zola’s celebrated novel, starring Jean Gabin and Simone Simon, Renoir’s “Beast” was set after the Popular Front won elections in 1936.

“The film has a perennial appeal,” said Sophie Kopaczynski, Studiocanal exec veep of communication. “It combines the talents of Zola and Renoir. Renoir set the film in modern times to express his social analysis.”

“The Human Beast” was “not in good shape. But it benefitted from a great restoration at Imagine Ritrovata, which made a 4K scan of the nitrate copy, then restored in 2K,” Kopaczynski said.

Setting a Nov. 27 release date, Studiocanal will distribute via one of France’s classic film distrib specialists. The restoration will also be released in Blu-ray and a box set edition on Dec. 3.

“To launch a big classic title, we try to launch it in a festival, such as Cannes or Venice. That is an excellent platform for the film. We make the marketing as modern as possible, to appeal to younger generations,” Kopaczynski said.

Bowing this summer, the acclaimed French animation, “La Roi et l’oiseau,” which took helmer Pierre Grimauld 30 years to complete, has hit some 45,000 admissions (around $375,000 B.O.) to date, and still counting, from a 100-plus screen count, a remarkable run.

Co-written by Jacques Prevert, and first released in an unfinished version in 1952, “Roi” influenced animators such as Japan’s Hayao Miyazaki, whose latest film, “The Wind Rises,” also screens at Venice.

More Film

  • Jimmie Fails Signs With CAA

    'Last Black Man in San Francisco' Star Jimmie Fails Signs With CAA

    Jimmie Fails, co-writer and star of “The Last Black Man in San Francisco,” has signed with CAA for representation. The drama, inspired by Fails’ own life, had its world premiere at this year’s Sundance Film Festival. In his review for Variety, chief film critic Peter Debruge described the film as “a gorgeous and touchingly idealistic [...]

  • Stuck

    Film Review: 'Stuck'

    A stalled New York City subway carriage serves as a toe-tapping musical Petri dish for six socioeconomically diverse souls in the unique stage-to-screen musical adaptation “Stuck.” Sharing a stylistic template with its 2016 left-coast cousin “La La Land” (which it predated Off-Broadway by a good four years), the film’s 2017 copyright suggests a missed opportunity [...]

  • Gay Chorus Deep South

    Why Airbnb Produced Documentary 'Gay Chorus Deep South,' Its First-Ever Film (EXCLUSIVE)

    The latest player to hit the film-festival circuit may be a bit unexpected: Airbnb, the travel-accommodations booking marketplace, developed, financed and produced documentary film “Gay Chorus Deep South,” set to premiere at the 2019 Tribeca Film Festival on April 29. It’s the company’s very first feature film. Directed by David Charles Rodrigues, “Gay Chorus Deep [...]

  • Clint Eastwood May Direct 'The Ballad

    Clint Eastwood May Direct 'The Ballad of Richard Jewell'

    Clint Eastwood may direct “The Ballad of Richard Jewell,” a look at a security guard whose life gets turned upside down after media reports identified him as a possible suspect in the 1996 Atlanta Olympics bombing. The film is currently set up at Disney/Fox and could reunite Eastwood with Alan Horn, the current Disney Studios [...]

  • Hagazussa: A Heathen's Curse

    Film Review: 'Hagazussa: A Heathen’s Curse'

    If “The Witch” had been directed by the early-career Werner Herzog of “Aguirre,” “Heart of Glass,” and “Even Dwarfs Started Small,” the result might have been something in the spirit of “Hagazussa,” Lukas Feigelfeld’s wholly arresting feature debut. Given the extended U.S. title “A Heathen’s Curse” to underline saleable supernatural elements, this enigmatic folktale-cum-horror is [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content