×
You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

Toronto Film Review: ‘Dom Hemingway’

Jude Law has long wanted to leave his mark on the British gangster genre, and his patience pays off in this talky comeback role.

With:

Jude Law, Richard E. Grant, Demian Bichir, Emilia Clarke, Kerry Condon, Jumayn Hunter, Madalina Ghenea, Nathan Stewart-Jarrett.

If the point of prison is to reform, then the experience hasn’t done Dom Hemingway much good. Judging by Jude Law’s opening monologue — a long, colorful ode to his macho character’s manhood, delivered under highly ironic circumstances — the hotheaded safe-cracker hasn’t exactly cooled down in the clink. Headed for a domestic release from Fox Searchlight next April, “Dom Hemingway” tags along for the rocky readjustment period the ex-con faces after paying his debt to society, a blustery whirlwind of activity that, once the dust settles, serves mostly as scenery for Law’s endearingly loquacious character to devour. Pic should be a hit at home, where it opens Nov. 8, and more of a specialty item Stateside, though the role could spell a comeback for its star.

“12 Years Is a Long Time” reads the first of several laugh-out-loud chapter cards at the story’s outset, and though it refers to the duration of Dom’s sentence, it also happens to be the amount of time since Law and then-wife Sadie Frost botched their attempt at making a Guy Ritchie knock-off with “Love, Honor and Obey.” Law has long wanted to leave his mark on the British gangster genre, and his patience pays off in this case, as “Dom Hemingway” — a far stronger piece of material from “The Matador” writer-director Richard Shepard — gives him a chance to sink his teeth into one of the meatiest personalities in a genre known for larger-than-life types.

The project also benefits from the interval of time, now that the onetime pretty boy looks a bit more bedraggled, his receding hairline matched by forehead creases and lamb-chop facial hair. Law’s safe-cracking character has spent his better years behind bars, though he hasn’t lost his touch, as demonstrated in a scene where he wagers those family jewels of which he’s so proud that he can open a newfangled digital safe in less than 10 minutes.

As Brit-con movies go, “Dom Hemingway” feels like an extension of Nicolas Winding Refn’s “Bronson,” though in contrast with Tom Hardy’s hyper-aggressive criminal, Law brings a necessary weariness to this slightly more reined-in figure. Yes, the man tries to make up for 12 years with three days of hookers, booze and blow, though both director and star show far more restraint, reducing what might have been an extravagant montage to a few quick shots and bringing the focus back around to language.

He may strut, bow-legged with hips thrust forward like a cowboy or porn star, and he may launch into long tirades blue enough to make Tarantino blush, but Dom Hemingway is mostly talk — and so is the movie that bears his name. Conceived in the wonderfully baroque vein of British dramatist Martin McDonagh, Shepard’s dialogue comes fast and dense, layered with expletives and false bravado as Dom screams his demands at Russian crime boss Mr. Fontaine (Demian Bichir, terrific, but not an ounce Russian), requesting a round with the big man’s money-hungry moll (Romanian model Madalina Diana Ghenea, a real traffic-stopper) as a “present” for keeping his silence.

The pic also defies its own genre in the sense that most audiences would expect Dom either to seek some sort of payback for his prison time (the first half of the film) or to jump right back into crime — the assumed goal behind his awkward reconciliation with nightclub kingpin Lestor (Jumayn Hunter) in the second half. But all this flashy illicit activity merely serves as a smokescreen for the character’s true agenda: patching things up with Evelyn (“Game of Thrones’” Emilia Clarke), the daughter he abandoned when he refused to rat on his employer so many years ago. Evelyn represents the thing that separates Dom from Hardy’s Charles Bronson, the motivation to get his temper in check and return to the real world.

As in “The Matador,” Shepard balances a livelier-than-life script with striking, super-saturated images, which makes the film feel bigger than it is. He milks laughs from Dom’s unfiltered reaction to his own surroundings, such as Mr. Fontaine’s art collection or Lestor’s garish nightclub, and uses playful editing to create abruptly amusing twists on seemingly familiar situations, as when a drunken late-night joyride in Mr. Fontaine’s Rolls Royce serves as the first reversal in a succession of outrageous fortune shifts. Dana Congdon’s cutting effectively gives the impression of a magician doing card tricks: Just like Dom, the film always has something more up its sleeve.

Toronto Film Review: 'Dom Hemingway'

Reviewed at Toronto Film Festival (Special Presentations), Sept. 8, 2013. Running time: 93 MIN.

Production:

A Fox Searchlight release of a Fox Searchlight Pictures, BBC Films, Recorded Picture Co. presentation in association with Isle of Man Film, Hanway Films, Pinewood Pictures of a Jeremy Thomas production. Produced by Thomas. Co-producer, Nick O'Hagan.

Crew:

Directed, written by Richard Shepard. Camera (Deluxe color, widescreen), Giles Nuttgens; editor, Dana Congdon; music, Rolfe Kent; music supervisors, Ian Neil, John Coyne; production designer, Laurence Dorman; supervising art director, Bill Crutcher; art director, Jonathan Houlding; set decorator, Ute Bergk; costume designer, Julian Day; supervising sound editor (Dolby Digital), Paul Carter; re-recording mixers, Brendan Nicholson, Paul Carter; visual effects supervisors, Dominic Parker, Tom Debenham; visual effects, One of Us; stunt coordinator, Glenn Marks; associate producer, Richard Mansell; assistant director, Neil Wallace; casting, Nina Gold.

With:

Jude Law, Richard E. Grant, Demian Bichir, Emilia Clarke, Kerry Condon, Jumayn Hunter, Madalina Ghenea, Nathan Stewart-Jarrett.

More Film

  • FX's 'Snowfall' Panel TCA Winter Press

    John Singleton Hospitalized After Suffering Stroke

    UPDATED with statements from John Singleton’s family and FX Networks John Singleton, the Oscar nominated director and writer of “Boyz N’ the Hood,” has suffered a stroke. Sources confirm to Variety that Singleton checked himself into the hospital earlier this week after experiencing pain in his leg. The stroke has been characterized by doctors as [...]

  • 'Curse of La Llorona' Leads Slow

    'Curse of La Llorona' Leads Slow Easter Weekend at the Box Office

    New Line’s horror pic “The Curse of La Llorona” will summon a solid $25 million debut at the domestic box office, leading a quiet Easter weekend before Marvel’s “Avengers: Endgame” hits theaters on April 26. The James Wan-produced “La Llorona,” playing in 3,372 theaters, was a hit with hispanic audiences, who accounted for nearly 50% [...]

  • Jim Jarmusch in 'Carmine Street Guitars'

    Film Review: 'Carmine Street Guitars'

    “Carmine Street Guitars” is a one-of-a-kind documentary that exudes a gentle, homespun magic. It’s a no-fuss, 80-minute-long portrait of Rick Kelly, who builds and sells custom guitars out of a modest storefront on Carmine Street in New York’s Greenwich Village, and the film touches on obsessions that have been popping up, like fragrant weeds, in [...]

  • Missing Link Laika Studios

    ‘Missing Link’ Again Tops Studios’ TV Ad Spending

    In this week’s edition of the Variety Movie Commercial Tracker, powered by the TV ad measurement and attribution company iSpot.tv, Annapurna Pictures claims the top spot in spending for the second week in a row with “Missing Link.” Ads placed for the animated film had an estimated media value of $5.91 million through Sunday for [...]

  • Little Woods

    Film Review: 'Little Woods'

    So much of the recent political debate has focused on the United States’ southern border, and on the threat of illegal drugs and criminals filtering up through Mexico. But what of the north, where Americans traffic opiates and prescription pills from Canada across a border that runs nearly three times as long? “Little Woods” opens [...]

  • Beyonce's Netflix Deal Worth a Whopping

    Beyonce's Netflix Deal Worth a Whopping $60 Million (EXCLUSIVE)

    Netflix has become a destination for television visionaries like Shonda Rhimes and Ryan Murphy, with deals worth $100 million and $250 million, respectively, and top comedians like Chris Rock and Dave Chappelle ($40 million and $60 million, respectively). The streaming giant, which just announced it’s added nearly 10 million subscribers in Q1, is honing in [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content