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Toronto Film Review: ‘The Bit Player’

Jeffrey Jeturian pokes good-natured fun at TV soap operas in this appealing dramedy starring Filipino screen queen Vilma Santos.

With:

Vilma Santos, Marlon Rivera, Vincent de Jesus, Ruby Ruiz, Tart Carlos, Ronaline Enriquez, Cherry Pie Picache, Richard Yap, Piolo Pascual, Marian Rivera, Cherie Gil, Eula Valdes, Tom Rodriguez, Pilar Pilapil. (Tagalog, English dialogue)

The unshakable optimism of a middle-aged extra is the warm heart driving “The Bit Player,” an appealing dramedy that pokes plenty of good-natured fun at TV soap operas. Anchored by a glowing central performance by Filipino screen queen Vilma Santos as the single mother who smiles her way through work-related indignities in order to pay for her daughter’s education, the pic reps a fine feather in the cap of veteran helmer Jeffrey Jeturian. Winner of the audience award for best film in its category at Cinemalaya and a hit in domestic release in August, this crowdpleaser launches on limited North American screens on Sept. 13.

The wise and witty screenplay by Jeturian, Zigcarlo Dulay and Antoinette Jadaone hits the right mix of humor and compassion from the outset. In a funny pre-credits sequence showing an exasperated production crew hiring and firing a succession of extras for the tiny speaking role of a housemaid, eager-to-please hopeful Loida Malabanan (Santos) is pipped for the job at the last moment.

Very much a modern incarnation of heroines from classic Hollywood melodramas of the 1950s, Loida only strengthens her resolve in the face of such setbacks. Fiercely determined to not ask her (unseen) ex-husband for financial assistance, Loida is driven to survive and succeed because of her adult daughter, Joyce (Ronaline Enriquez), also a divorcee and a college student whose tuition fees are due.

Unhurried opening segments paint a lovely picture of a selfless mother undaunted by being lumped into the category of “nameless wannabees” by fast-talking casting director Josie (Ruby Ruiz, terrific). Loida’s belief that it’s never too late to become a star is one of many character traits that will have audiences rooting for her all the way. With this critical factor firmly in place and Santos in supreme form, Jeturian steers a more overtly comedic path once Loida and her spunky best pal, Venus (Tart Carlos), find work on the set of a soap opera regaling with the title of “You Were Mine First.”

Constant chuckles and a fair supply of big belly laughs are the order of the day as Loida, Venus and a lovable collection of fellow nameless wannabees are herded like cattle by Josie, acid-tongued assistant director Vincent (Vincent de Jesus, hilarious) and the super-stressed-out director (Marlon Rivera) of “You Were Mine First.” As expected, much of the fun derives from scenes being shot for the wildly melodramatic “You Were Mine First.” To that end, Jeturian gets great value from guest appearances by a host of big-name local stars including hunky matinee idol Piolo Pascual as troubled groom-in-waiting Brando, Pilar Pilapil as severe matriarch Dona Esmerelda and a wonderfully over-the-top Cherie Gil as gun-toting super-bitch Dona Beatriz.

For all the merriment on display, the screenplay never loses sight of the economic and emotional imperatives propelling Loida’s uncomplaining acceptance of her place at the bottom of the entertainment-industry food chain. It’s no surprise when Loida finally gets a chance to make a mark with big speaking role in “You Were Mine First,” but the manner in which this plays out is surprising and genuinely touching.

As if inspired by the lightning-fast schedules of teledramas, Jeturian and his team shot this highly entertaining item in just 11 days with tip-top results. Lenser Lee Briones contributes significantly to maintaining the balance of comedy and heartfelt drama with elegant compositions in Loida’s domestic environment, and appropriately brighter, flatter images during her time on the soap set. Vincent de Jesus delivers a delightfully bouncy score to match his thesping input, and production designer Ericson Navarro clearly had a ball creating the delightfully tacky interiors for “You Were Mine First.” Other tech work is on the money.

Toronto Film Review: 'The Bit Player'

Reviewed at Cinemalaya Philippine Independent Film Festival (Directors Showcase), Aug. 1, 2013. (Also in Toronto Film Festival — Contemporary World Cinema.) Running time: 112 MIN. Original title: "Ekstra"

Production:

(Philippines) A Star Cinema release of a Cinemalaya, Quantum Films presentation of a Quantum Films production. (International sales: Ignatius Films, Manila.) Produced by Joji Alonso, Ferdinand Lapuz. Executive producers, Alonso, John Victor Tence, Jeffrey Jeturian, Vilma Santos-Recto.

Crew:

Directed by Jeffrey Jeturian. Screenplay, Zigcarlo Dulay, Antoinette Jadaone, Jeturian. Camera (color, HD), Lee Briones; editors, Glenn M. Ituriaga, Dulay; music, Vincent de Jesus; production designer, Ericson Navarro; art director, Erwin Sanchez; sound (stereo), Addiss B. Tabong; visual effects, Patrick Beltran, John Kenneth Paclibar, Jhai De Leon; line producer, Charyl Chan-De Guzman; associate producer, Ron Capili; assistant directors, Ritchie Balza Rono, Panying Limon, Rolando T. Inocencio.

With:

Vilma Santos, Marlon Rivera, Vincent de Jesus, Ruby Ruiz, Tart Carlos, Ronaline Enriquez, Cherry Pie Picache, Richard Yap, Piolo Pascual, Marian Rivera, Cherie Gil, Eula Valdes, Tom Rodriguez, Pilar Pilapil. (Tagalog, English dialogue)

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