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Happiness Never Comes Alone

A glossy romantic comedy filled with amusing pratfalls and palpable chemistry, "Happiness Never Comes Alone" also explores the oft-occurring but rarely seen problems associated with starting a new relationship and having a decent love life while trying to raise three attention-demanding kids.

With:
With: Sophie Marceau, Gad Elmaleh, Maurice Barthelemy, Francois Berleand, Michael Abiteboul, Julie-Anne Roth, Macha Meril, Francois Vincentelli, Robert Charlebois, Timeo Leloup, Milena Chiron, Timothe Gauron, Cyril Guei, Valerie Crouzet, Litzi Veszi.

A glossy romantic comedy filled with amusing pratfalls and palpable chemistry, “Happiness Never Comes Alone” also explores the oft-occurring but rarely seen problems associated with starting a new relationship and having a decent love life while trying to raise three attention-demanding kids. This likable piece of mainstream fluff from Gallic filmmaker James Huth (“Brice de Nice”), headlined by French stars Sophie Marceau and Gad Elmaleh, has done brisk summer biz in Gaul, where it’s closing in on 1.5 million admissions. Squarely aimed at babysitter-requiring auds, this old-Hollywood-style date movie should appeal especially to Euro distribs.

Montmartre dweller Sacha (Elmaleh), a Jewish jazz composer, and Charlotte (Marceau), the head of a Parisian foundation that supports contempo visual artists, literally bump into each other when leaving the chic headquarters of the company that Sacha has written a jingle for and that Charlotte’s organization is funded by.

The meet-cute moment is more of a “meet wet,” as it unfolds in the middle of a rainstorm, and Charlotte falls face down onto the pavement before she’s even exchanged two words with Sacha. The scene immediately sets a tone of romantically heightened reality that clearly harks back to classic Hollywood screwball comedies, where it never rains but it pours, and where accidents that would K.O. any normal person are instead clumsily affecting and without long-term consequences.

Of course, despite their different backgrounds, working-class artist Sacha and high-society darling Charlotte have a lot in common, starting with the fact their own personalities are overshadowed to an unhealthy extent by others. For Sacha, it’s his famous, identically named pianist father, who died years earlier, while for Charlotte, it is her husband, Alain (Francois Berleand), from whom she’s separated but not divorced, and who owns the company Sacha and Charlotte both work for.

Another complicating factor in this nascent romance is the presence of Charlotte’s three children (Timeo Leloup, Milena Chiron, Timothe Gauron), who can’t accept that their daily routine might be upended for something as insignificant as Mom’s new lover. Initially, Sacha tries to hide from the pint-sized domestic terrorists, as in a simple but effective running gag in which the beanpole composer simply stands still and pretends not to be there.

The screenplay, written by Huth and his wife, Sonja Shillito, finds just the right balance between his and her perspectives, while the actors breathe life into their slightly cliched characters by keeping things low-key and affable, displaying enough chemistry to have auds root for them against all odds.

Some of the bigger setpieces, including an impromptu water ballet caused by faulty bathroom plumbing, are perfectly choreographed and timed, with Marceau clearly enjoying the opportunity for physical comedy. After appearing alongside Audrey Tautou in “Priceless,” popular standup comic Elmaleh here offers further evidence he’s got solid romantic-lead appeal. Berleand is deliciously evil, while the kids are cute without being overly mannered.

Tech package is silky smooth, with both Paris and New York (where Sacha dreams of making a musical) bathed in warm, saturated colors. The production design further underlines the film’s influences by including various conspicuously placed movie posters. Pic’s playlist is appropriately filled with recognizable, jazzy titles.

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Happiness Never Comes Alone

France

Production: A Pathe Distribution release of an Eskwad production, in association with Pathe, Captain Movies, TF1 Films Prod., with the participation of Canal Plus, Cine Plus, TF1. (International sales: Pathe Intl., Paris.) Produced by Richard Grandpierre. Directed by James Huth. Screenplay, Sonja Shillito, Huth.

Crew: Camera (color, 35mm-to-HD), Stephane Le Parc; editor, Joelle Hache; music, Bruno Coulais; production designer, Pierre Queffelean; costume designer, Olivier Beriot; sound (Dolby Digital), Pierre Andre, Alain Feat, Nicolas Dambroise, Cyril Holtz, Damien Lazzerini; special effects, Alain Carsoux; line producers, Frederic Doniguian, Shillito; assistant director, Maurice Hermet; casting, Antoinette Boulat, Elsa Pharaon, Anne Barbier. Reviewed at Cinema Studio 28, Paris, July 20, 2012. Running time: 109 MIN.

With: With: Sophie Marceau, Gad Elmaleh, Maurice Barthelemy, Francois Berleand, Michael Abiteboul, Julie-Anne Roth, Macha Meril, Francois Vincentelli, Robert Charlebois, Timeo Leloup, Milena Chiron, Timothe Gauron, Cyril Guei, Valerie Crouzet, Litzi Veszi.

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