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Disney, Pixar wrangle CinemaCon

Pixar announces Latin-themed feature for 2015

From Oz to the Wild West and beyond, Disney unfurled a fantastical presentation here Tuesday, touting its upcoming slate of films — including the announcement of a a sequel to “The Muppets” and a new, Dia de los Muertos-themed toon from Pixar.

The Mexican Day of the Dead holiday pic will be headed by “Toy Story 3” director Lee Unkrich and producer Darla K. Anderson, Pixar chief John Lasseter announced from the CinemaCon stage. He also said the studio has titled its dino pic “The Good Dinosaur,” set for May 30, 2014; and has dated its “Untitled Pixar Movie that Takes You Inside the Mind” for June 19, 2015.

Disney Distribution EVP Dave Hollis emceed presentations of drama “People Like Us,” Tim Burton’s stop-motion toon “Frankenweenie,” and most notably upcoming tentpole “Oz: The Great and Powerful,” showcasing a crafty mosaic of set footage, concept art and brief, unfinished clips from Sam Raimi’s vision of Oz that exhibs were shown in place of polished scenes.

Bailey only spent a moment talking about Steven Spielberg’s “Lincoln,” showing only headshots of the principal actors over images from the production itself.

Like Paramount and Warner Bros. before it, Disney had no problem getting its stars to come to Las Vegas, as Mila Kunis and James Franco came out to cap the “Oz” presentation, and Johnny Depp strolled onstage to talk about his role as Tonto in “The Lone Ranger.”

Bereft of footage from the oater-actioner, Disney used the Muppets as its razzle-dazzle, with Kermit the Frog riding in as the masked man on his horse “Splinter” (“I’m riding a plywood horse, totally naked” he explained).

“I believe (‘The Lone Ranger’) will redefine the Western in the same way that ‘Pirates’ inspired a whole generation of pirate fans,” Bailey said.

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