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Rick Santorum was asked over the weekend whether he supported the Stop Online Piracy Act, the anti-piracy bill that has galvanized Internet firms. bloggers and public interest groups against it. (In fact, chances are if you have heard of the legislation, you have been made aware of it by an opponent sounding the alarm). Unlike Ron Paul, who cited the bill on the stump as an example of government overreach, Santorum said there are limits to freedom on the Internet, although he stopped short of endorsing the legislation because he said he did not know enough about it. (Via Mediaite). “There are private property rights,” Santorum said, adding that even rights like freedom of speech have limitations.

Santorum is hardly a friend of Hollywood. Gail Collins read his book, “It Takes a Family,” and came away with this passage: Collins writes, “At one point, he calls for social conservatives to join hands with “our entertainment ‘nobility’ ” — the movie stars and sports heroes — to strip the sleaze from popular culture. He realizes his readers may accuse him of consorting with the enemy. (‘Am I now suggesting appeasement, rapprochement, or perhaps even partial surrender?’) Of course not! Unlike the other top dogs, he explains, the entertainment celebrities are not really liberal, but only pretending to be ‘because that’s the cultural norm created by the Bigs in their industry.'”