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Welcome to ‘Ask Variety’

It’s the inaugural episode of “Ask Variety,” our new Q and A format with our readers and users. Variety’s David S. Cohen has sought questions through Twitter, and we’re pleased to offer the first Q and A here:

Q: Is there a space at the b.o. for anything that’s not either a microbudget or a blockbuster? From @FilmLandEmpire

A: While it’s true that blockbusters and micro-budgeted films appear to earn the biggest (and most) box office headlines, there definitely is room for mid-range budgeted films entering the market. Why else would companies like Relativity, Open Road Films, FilmDistrict, Lionsgate, or Summit get into the game of releasing, almost solely, those types of films?

In the case of Relativity, the distrib released earlier this year “Limitless,” which grossed $76.2 million; Lionsgate’s similarly mid-range budgeted pic, “The Lincoln Lawyer,” collected nearly $55 million, while Summit’s “Source Code” has earned almost $50 million.

Those are just a few examples to launch within weeks of each other, and with the above mentioned companies looking to fulfill healthy release mandates ranging from six to eight films per year, the biz should look forward to similar success stories to come.

— Answer from Andrew Stewart, film reporter

 

 

Is there a space at the b.o. for anything that’s not either a microbudget or a blockbuster? From @FilmLandEmpire

 

While, it’s true, blockbusters and micro-budgeted films appear to earn the biggest (and most) box office headlines, there definitely is room for mid-range budgeted films entering the market. Why else would companies like Relativity, Open Road Films, FilmDistrict, Lionsgate, or Summit get into the game of releasing, almost solely, those types of films?

In the case of Relativity, the distrib released earlier this year “Limitless,” which grossed $76.2 million; Lionsgate’s similarly mid-range budgeted pic, “The Lincoln Lawyer,” collected nearly $55 million, while Summit’s “Source Code” has earned almost $50 million.

Those are just a few examples to launch within weeks of each other, and with the above mentioned companies looking to fulfill healthy release mandates ranging from six to eight films per year, the biz should look forward to similar success stories still to come.