×
You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

Spanish pix gross $129 mil abroad

France, U.S., best foreign markets in 2010

Woody Allen’s “You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger,” a co-production between Spain’s Mediapro and Letty Aronson’s New York-based Gravier Prods., was the highest-grossing Spanish film outside Spain in 2010, taking €17.8 million ($25.5 million).

In a Spanish international top five for last year, “Stranger” is followed by Juan Jose Campanella’s “The Secret in Their Eyes” ($24.2 million), co-produced by Spain’s Tornasol Films; Ilion Animation Studios’ “Planet 51” ($20.6 million), helmed by Jorge Blanco, which made much of its coin off a late 2009 U.S. bow; Rodrigo Cortes’ Sundance hit “Buried” ($17 million), from Versus Entertainment; and Alejandro Amenabar’s Mod Prods.-produced “Agora” ($9.5 million).

For the third year, Spanish movies punched bigger B.O. outside Spain than on home turf.

Total foreign B.O. came in at $128.8 million compared to a local take of $114.9 million, according to a study unveiled Monday by Spain’s Fapae producers’ association at the Madrid de Cine-Spanish Film Screenings, which ends today.Study sources figures from Rentrak, the European Audiovisual Observatory and the Icaa Spanish Film Institute.Spanish movies’ local tallies were $114.9 million B.O. gross.

“Spain is a country with quite a lot of talent, but it has to re-conquer its (local) public,” said distributor-producer Fernando Trueba, the Madrid de Cine godfather.

The Spanish film biz’s perf overseas still trails that of France, whose box office receipts abroad came in at $472 million in 2010, according to Unifrance estimates.

Foreign B.O. on movies from Spain was 36% down on estimates for 2009. With Spanish film foreign bows increasing 7% last year versus 2009, up to 91, the plunge in their takings, is explained, Fapae prexy Pedro Perez argued, by the absence of a wide U.S. release in 2010 to compare with Spanish toon pic “Planet 51.”

“Planet 51” opened Stateside November 2009 via Sony on 3,000-plus prints, grossing $39.2 million by year-end 2009.

With no big bow to goose U.S. results, France, where Spanish films collected $32.8 million, was Spain’s biggest export market in 2010.

U.S./Canada ranked second ($18.8 million) and Italy was third ($17.1 million).

In a sign that Latin America is emerging as an appreciable foreign territory for Spanish films, Mexico was the fourth biggest market. While total grosses in Mexico were just $7.2 million, the number of Spanish films opening in Mexico — 25, joint first with Italy — was 56% up on 2009.

The 2011 Fapae prize for the Spanish film with the biggest impact abroad was won by Daniel Monzon’s prison-set thriller “Cell 211,” sold internationally by Films Distribution.

Produced by Spain’s Vaca Fims, Morena Films, and Telecinco Cinema and France’s La Fabrique 2, the Spanish B.O. and sales sleeper bowed in 11 countries last year.

At the Fapae conference, producer Gonzalo Salazar-Simpson, prexy of Spain’s Asociacion Estatal de Cine, a producers’ lobby, argued that, given dwindling sources of national finance, Spanish producers should look to sales agents to not only pre-sell or sell their films, but also help find coin for their development and package their financing.

Popular on Variety

More Film

  • La Rouei

    Lumiere Festival to Premiere Epic Restoration of 'La Roue'

    LYON, France  —  This coming Saturday and Sunday, the Lumière Festival will turn back the clock nearly one hundred years as the festival premieres a new completed reconstruction of Abel Gance’s 1923 masterpiece “La Roue” (“The Wheel”) that restores the classic to its original 7.5 hour length. Consisting of a prologue and four movements, “La [...]

  • Lina Wertmuller portrait

    Lina Wertmuller’s Exceptional Career Revisited

    In the still American-led realm of the Academy Awards, it’s unusual for the helmer of a film not in the English language to score a Best Director nomination. It’s far rarer still, meanwhile, for a woman to be nominated in the category at all: just five have done so in 91 years. Only one director, [...]

  • Fifth Seal

    Lumière Festival Honors Hungary, Screens Classics ‘Women,’ ‘The Fifth Seal’

    For the fifth year running, Lyon’s Lumière Festival will honor Hungarian cinema and invite guests of the Hungarian National Film Fund to present two classic Hungarian films from important national filmmakers, Márta Mészáros’ “Ők ketten” (“Women”) and Zoltán Fábri’s “Fifth Seal.” Both films will be presented by Lumière Festival special guest Marina Vlady on Oct [...]

  • Godzilla

    Criterion Collection President Peter Becker on Storytelling, Bergman vs Godzilla, B-movies

    LYON, France  —  The Lumière Festival’s International Classic Film Market (MIFC) kicked off on Tuesday in Lyon, France, with a keynote address by Criterion Collection President Peter Becker. The exec discussed the company’s storied history and evolution over the decades into a leading publisher of classic and contemporary films from around the world in high-quality [...]

  • Manuel Chiche

    Boutique Distributor Manuel Chiche Offers A State of The Industry

    LYON, France  — Manuel Chiche is riding high. Since June, his boutique distribution outlet The Jokers set admission records with Bong Joon-ho’s “Parasite,” selling nearly 1.7 million tickets in France and still going strong as the film heads into its 19th week in theaters. Indeed, “Parasite” is now the second most successful Palme d’Or winner of [...]

  • Toni

    Italy’s L'Immagine Ritrovata Expected to Take Over France’s Eclair Cinema

    LYON, France  —  Leading Italian restoration company L’Immagine Ritrovata’s acquisition of renowned film lab Eclair Cinéma, announced last month, is expected to be approved by the French Commercial Court of Nanterre at the end of November or beginning of December, according to a source familiar with the deal. L’Immagine Ritrovata’s French subsidiary, L’Image Retrouvée, last [...]

  • Jay and Silent Bob Reboot

    Film Review: 'Jay and Silent Bob Reboot'

    In a film culture overrun by Marvel epics, wild-stunt action flicks, and other grandiose juvenilia, it is often said that the mid-budget, script-driven movie for adults is becoming a thing of the past. But don’t tell that to Kevin Smith, whose “Jay and Silent Bob Reboot,” a shaggy antic throwaway that premiered Tuesday in the [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content