You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

Farewell Gary

Pic struggles to find a balance between its central father-son conflict and the orbiting stories of the burg's other few inhabitants.

With:
With: Jean-Pierre Bacri, Dominique Reymond, Yasmine Belmadi, Mhamed Arezki, Alexandre Bonnin, Sabrina Ouazani, Hab-Eddine Sebiane.

A boy in a desolate, post-industrial French town thinks his dad might be Gary Cooper in “Farewell, Gary,” the debut of scribe-helmer Nassim Amaouche. Pic struggles to find a balance between its central father-son conflict (which does not involve Cooper) and the orbiting stories of the burg’s other few inhabitants. Jean-Luc Godard might have loved “Man of the West,” but “Farewell, Gary” is unlikely to find similar champions Stateside. Euro revenue will mostly come from ancillary.

Opening sees Francis (Jean-Pierre Bacri, “Look at Me”) fretting over the return of his ex-con son, Samir (Yasmine Belmadi). He has come to find work, but the only factory has closed, effectively destroying the local economy. Francis’ liaison with Marie (Dominique Reymond) is an open secret, though her tubby son (Alexandre Bonnin) thinks his dad is a long-dead cowboy. Updated Western references abound, and juxtaposition with the last few souls (mostly of Maghrebi descent) that stayed behind in harsh economic conditions is interesting but never fully develops. Mildly comic and languid scenes alternate until the (unsurprising) big reveal. Thesping is routine, and strangely, lensing isn’t in widescreen. Other tech credits are fine.

Farewell Gary

France

Production: A StudioCanal release of a Les Films A4 presentation and production, in association with StudioCanal, Rhone-Alpes Cinema. (International sales: StudioCanal, Issy-les-Moulineaux, France.) Produced by Jean-Philippe Andraca, Christian Berard. Directed, written by Nassim Amaouche.

Crew: Camera (color), Samuel Collardey; editor, Julien Lacheray; music, Le Trio Joubran; production designer, Dan Bevan; costume designer, Christel Birot. Reviewed at Cannes Film Festival (Critics' Week), May 17, 2009. Running time: 75 MIN.

With: With: Jean-Pierre Bacri, Dominique Reymond, Yasmine Belmadi, Mhamed Arezki, Alexandre Bonnin, Sabrina Ouazani, Hab-Eddine Sebiane.

More Film

  • Los Angeles Animation Festival Will Honor

    Titmouse Founder Chris Prynoski to be Honored at Los Angeles Animation Festival (Exclusive)

    A boy in a desolate, post-industrial French town thinks his dad might be Gary Cooper in “Farewell, Gary,” the debut of scribe-helmer Nassim Amaouche. Pic struggles to find a balance between its central father-son conflict (which does not involve Cooper) and the orbiting stories of the burg’s other few inhabitants. Jean-Luc Godard might have loved […]

  • Martin Scorsese, Sigourney Weaver to Appear

    Martin Scorsese, Sigourney Weaver, Giuseppe Tornatore Set for Rome Film Festival

    A boy in a desolate, post-industrial French town thinks his dad might be Gary Cooper in “Farewell, Gary,” the debut of scribe-helmer Nassim Amaouche. Pic struggles to find a balance between its central father-son conflict (which does not involve Cooper) and the orbiting stories of the burg’s other few inhabitants. Jean-Luc Godard might have loved […]

  • Terence Stamp English actor Terence Stamp

    Terence Stamp, Gemma Arterton Join Netflix's 'Murder Mystery'

    A boy in a desolate, post-industrial French town thinks his dad might be Gary Cooper in “Farewell, Gary,” the debut of scribe-helmer Nassim Amaouche. Pic struggles to find a balance between its central father-son conflict (which does not involve Cooper) and the orbiting stories of the burg’s other few inhabitants. Jean-Luc Godard might have loved […]

  • 'The Parting Glass' Review: An Honest,

    Film Review: 'The Parting Glass'

    A boy in a desolate, post-industrial French town thinks his dad might be Gary Cooper in “Farewell, Gary,” the debut of scribe-helmer Nassim Amaouche. Pic struggles to find a balance between its central father-son conflict (which does not involve Cooper) and the orbiting stories of the burg’s other few inhabitants. Jean-Luc Godard might have loved […]

  • Owen (CHRIS PRATT) with a baby

    What 'Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom's' Success Means for the Franchise's Future

    A boy in a desolate, post-industrial French town thinks his dad might be Gary Cooper in “Farewell, Gary,” the debut of scribe-helmer Nassim Amaouche. Pic struggles to find a balance between its central father-son conflict (which does not involve Cooper) and the orbiting stories of the burg’s other few inhabitants. Jean-Luc Godard might have loved […]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content