×

Never Back Down

Though it telegraphs its punches too obviously, the pugilism-and-perspiration epic “Never Back Down” has all the ingredients to be a knockout at the B.O.

With:
Jake Tyler - Sean Faris Baja Miller - Amber Heard Ryan McCarthy - Cam Gigandet Max Cooperman - Evan Peters Margot Tyler - Leslie Hope Jean Roqua - Djimon Hounsou Charlie Tyler - Wyatt Smith

Though it telegraphs its punches too obviously, the pugilism-and-perspiration epic “Never Back Down” has all the ingredients to be a knockout at the B.O. and in the DVD market. Popularity of the Ultimate Fighting Championship will undoubtedly help, as will the meller’s glorification of violence and rationalization of revenge. Best part, though, is the cast: Everyone’s a model, everyone beats each other half to death, and no one looks as if they’ve ever suffered so much as a coldsore.

Sean Faris, who more than resembles a young Tom Cruise (and no doubt has stable of people promoting that very idea), is Jake Tyler, an angry young man from Iowa who winds up in Orlando, Fla., with his mom (Leslie Hope) and younger brother (Wyatt Smith). He immediately gets drafted into the local fight-club scene via a vicious beating from local bully Ryan McCarthy (Cam Gigandet).

As anyone who has ever seen a boxing movie, any kind of sports movie or even a Western can tell you, the entire narrative will be focused on how, when and why Jake beats the living daylights out of Ryan. This isn’t giving anything away, any more than it’d be giving away the plot of summer to say that birds fly south for the winter. The tantalizing question is how the pic will explain all the violence away. “Never Back Down” tries, but not very hard.

Popular on Variety

Helmer Jeff Wadlow showed promise with “Cry Wolf” (2005), but sometimes seems to think he’s directing a commercial for beer, cars and/or feminine hygiene products. So much narrative detail takes place during musical montages that there’s barely time to get the requisite mean-spirited violence into the picture. But Wadlow manages.

Faris is fine, but pic has a far more charismatic star in Gigandet, who is gleefully, hatefully sadistic and evil as Jake’s more skilled antagonist. Djimon Hounsou, never seen enough, is terrific doing the Pat Morita thing as Jean Roqua, who runs the gym where Jake will learn not just mixed-martial-arts techniques, but life-lessons too, natch.

Amber Heard, on the other hand, has to be seen to be believed. If there were an award for best coyly sexual biting of lower lip by an actress in a leading role, she would win it hands down. Heard plays Baja (yes!), the other side of the Jake-Ryan triangle, and isn’t done any favors by all the preposterous slow-mo entrances and babe-alicious posturing. There’s more than enough random flesh parading through “Never Back Down” that an actual performance by Heard (soon to be seen, and far more appreciated, in “All the Boys Love Mandy Lane”) would have been welcome.”Never Back Down” exists in a world of beautiful people, beautiful homes and much unoccupied money, where the rules of physics and physiology are on a serious vacation — the human body can’t do or withstand the things this movie claims it can, and one can only hope that pic’s probable success doesn’t trigger a dramatic rise in schoolyard body-slams, arm locks and chokeholds.

Production values are first-rate.

Never Back Down

Production: A Summit Entertainment release and presentation of a Mandalay Independent Pictures and BMP production. Produced by Craig Baumgarten, David Zelon. Co-producer, Bill Bannerman. Directed by Jeff Wadlow. Screenplay, Chris Hauty.

Crew: Camera (Deluxe color), Lukas Ettlin; editors, Victor DuBois, Debra Weinfeld; music, Michael Wandmacher; music supervisor, Julianne Jordan; production designer, Ira Random; art director, Andrew White; set decorator, Scott Jacobson; costume designer, Judy Ruskin Howell; sound (Dolby Digital/SDDS/DTS), Thomas E. Allen Sr.; sound designer, Lon Bender; stunt coordinators/fight choreographers, Jonathan Eusebio, Damon Caro; assistant director, John Woodward; casting, Sarah Halley Finn, Randi Hiller. Reviewed at Broadway screening room, New York, March 11, 2008. MPAA Rating: PG-13. Running time: 113 MIN.

With: Jake Tyler - Sean Faris Baja Miller - Amber Heard Ryan McCarthy - Cam Gigandet Max Cooperman - Evan Peters Margot Tyler - Leslie Hope Jean Roqua - Djimon Hounsou Charlie Tyler - Wyatt Smith

More Film

  • Liev Schreiber Broadway

    Film News Roundup: Liev Schreiber Joins Will Smith's Tennis Drama 'King Richard'

    In today’s film news roundup, Liev Schreiber and retired pro footballer Vernon Davis score roles, Jason Blum will speak at his alma mater, Irish drama “Rialto” finds a U.S. distributor and “1917” hits a box office milestone. CASTINGS Liev Schreiber will portray tennis coach Paul Cohen in Warner Bros.’ “King Richard” opposite Will Smith. Reinaldo [...]

  • AMC theater

    AMC Entertainment Reports Mixed Fourth-Quarter Results

    AMC Entertainment has reported mixed fourth-quarter results, which saw revenues rise 2.4% to $1.45 billion, despite a 4.4% drop in U.S. attendance to 62.3 million. The exhibitor, owned by Dalian Wanda Group, announced a fourth-quarter loss of $13.5 million, compared to a year-earlier profit of $170.6 million, due to $84.3 million of expense related to [...]

  • 'Straight Up' Review: James Sweeney's Gay

    'Straight Up': Film Review

    There’s a tradition in movies, as vital as a hypnotic action scene or a swooning love scene, of dialogue so witty and nimble and rapid-fire that it comes at you like something out of a stylized dream. I first encountered that brand of high-velocity verbal jousting in “A Hard Day’s Night,” and later on in [...]

  • Cahiers du Cinema

    French Film Magazine Cahiers du Cinema's Staff Quits Over New Ownership

    The future of iconic French film publication Cahiers du Cinéma is in question after the outlet’s entire staff quit in protest over the brand’s new ownership. The 15-member editorial staff has spoken out against a perceived conflict of interest posed by the Cahier’s owners — a group of bankers, tech entrepreneurs and film producers that [...]

  • John Singleton Victoria Mahoney Spike Lee

    In Honor of Black History Month, a Look at Black Directors Who Made History

    In 2019, the USC Annenberg Inclusion Initiative reported that 2018 was a historic year for black filmmakers, noting a “record high when it came to hiring black directors.” The report reflected a significant change, showing the push for diversity both behind and in front of the camera. Though the numbers are increasing, the report also [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content