×
You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

The Hammer

This inordinately likable and consistently funny boxing saga-cum-romantic comedy doesn't so much ridicule the "Rocky"-type inspirational sports fable as gently deflate its heroic overdrive. "The Hammer" marks the improbable but fruitful collaboration between the producer-director-actress team of "Kissing Jessica Stein" and radio/TV personality Adam Carolla, along with his sometime-writer Kevin Hench.

With:
With: Adam Carolla, Heather Juergensen, Oswaldo Castillo, Tom Quinn, Harold House Moore, Jonathan Hernandez.

This inordinately likable and consistently funny boxing saga-cum-romantic comedy doesn’t so much ridicule the “Rocky”-type inspirational sports fable as gently deflate its heroic overdrive. “The Hammer” marks the improbable but fruitful collaboration between the producer-director-actress team of “Kissing Jessica Stein” and radio/TV personality Adam Carolla, along with his sometime-writer Kevin Hench. Carolla’s gangling charm and improv rhythms nicely loosen up helmer Charles Herman-Wurmfeld’s studied setups without ever deviating from the story’s solid underlying structure. A strong crowd-pleaser in its own unassuming small-pic way, requiring savvy handling, “Hammer” could nail an inside sleeper track.

Carolla plays Jerry Ferro, carpenter by day, Pasadena gym boxing instructor by night. On his 40th birthday, he loses his girlfriend through lack of ambition and his carpenter job through lack of patience with his boss’ verbal abuse. Jerry’s birthday also marks the start of a sparkling romantic relationship with one of his boxing students, Lindsay (Heather Juergensen, the woman who kissed, and wrote, “Jessica Stein”), a public defender with a wicked appreciation for Jerry’s laid-back wit.

A dedicated underachiever, Jerry has been kicking around since, at age 19, he abandoned his promising attempt to earn a spot on the Olympic boxing team. But opportunity beckons anew.

A knockdown during an impromptu sparring round brings Jerry to the attention of big-time boxing coach Eddie Bell (Tom Quinn). The coach offers Jerry another chance to train for the Olympics, alongside his two more promising hopefuls: sweet, earnestly religious lightweight Victor Padilla (Jonathan Hernandez) and light heavyweight Robert Brown (Harold House Moore), who is not the least enthralled with his geriatric whitebread competition. Jerry’s Sancho Panza-ish Nicaraguan sidekick, Ozzie (Oswaldo Castillo), tags along for the bumpily quixotic ride.

Carolla, who wrote pic’s story, was a Golden Glover (and a carpenter), and his solid grounding in the sport works less to lend gritty realism or slapstick plausibility to the many boxing scenes than to create a believable sense of solidarity among the three boxers.

Jerry’s age and experience allow him to see through the false competitiveness Coach Bell seeks to instill among the fighters to disguise his own manipulation of them.

Yet this authentic-seeming understanding of the boxing world never merely stands in as a simplistic metaphor for the triumph of the underdog; nor does it prevent pic from being outright funny on its own terms, thanks largely to Carolla’s dry impromptu humor and a steady stream of visual gags involving the rigors of training.

This anchoring in the real-life discipline of pugilism also proves, surprisingly, a good way to highlight pic’s romantic-comedy elements. Of course, it never hurts to bring together three writers who have longstanding prior associations: scripter Hench was head scribe of “Too Late With Adam Carolla” and is married to producer/star Juergensen.

Exchanges between Carolla and Juergensen certainly do not lack for chemistry, recalling the physicality and heightened sexual edge that informed helmer George Cukor’s “Pat and Mike,” that greatest of sports-themed romantic comedies. If Herman-Wurmfeld’s images lack Cukor’s kinetic condensation, at least they never interrupt the flow or heroically isolate a character against the backdrop of his greatness.

Tech credits are fluid and informal, and production values are suited to the story’s human-scale proportions.

Popular on Variety

The Hammer

Production: An Eden Wurmfeld Films, Bentley Film Group production. Produced by Eden Wurmfeld, Heather Juergensen, Eric Ganz. Executive producers, Adam Carolla, Steven Firestone, Gregory Firestone. Co-producer, Kevin Hench. Directed by Charles Herman-Wurmfeld. Screenplay, Kevin Hench, from a story by Adam Carolla.

Crew: Camera (color), Marco Fargnoli; editor, Rich Fox; music, John Swihart, Matt Mariano; music supervisor, Jennifer Ross; production designer, Mickey Siggins; costume designer, Abigail Nicto; sound designer (Dolby Digital), Zach Seivers; casting, Michael Hothorn. Reviewed at Tribeca Film Festival (Encounters), April 27, 2007. Running time: 93 MIN.

With: With: Adam Carolla, Heather Juergensen, Oswaldo Castillo, Tom Quinn, Harold House Moore, Jonathan Hernandez.

More Film

  • Bob IgerSimon Weisenthal Gala honoring Bob

    Bob Iger Would Have Combined Disney With Apple if Steve Jobs Were Still Alive

    Disney and Apple are both launching their own streaming services come November, but Disney CEO Bob Iger says the two companies weren’t always on competing paths. In an excerpt from his autobiography published Wednesday in “Vanity Fair,” Iger revealed that Disney and Apple likely would have merged if Steve Jobs hadn’t died in 2011. “I [...]

  • Aaron Janus Lionsgate

    Lionsgate Hires 'A Quiet Place' Producer Aaron Janus as Senior VP of Production

    Lionsgate has hired Aaron Janus as its new senior vice president of production and promoted Meredith Wieck to the post of vice president of production.  Prior to Lionsgate, Janus served as Platinum Dunes’ head of development, where he oversaw filmmakers Brad Fuller, Andrew Form and Michael Bane. There, he brought in “A Quiet Place,” on [...]

  • Ang Lee Reveals First Look at

    Ang Lee on 'Gemini Man' and De-Aging Will Smith

    On paper, Ang Lee’s “Gemini Man” is a standard-issue, shoot ’em up with Will Smith playing a deadly assassin who must battle a younger clone of himself. The explosions and gun battles aren’t what drew Lee to the project, even if they’re the reason that most people will show up at theaters when it opens [...]

  • Hopper Reserve

    Dennis Hopper's Dying Wish: His Own Strain of Marijuana

    Even as celebrity brands are starting to flood the emerging Cannabis market, Hopper Reserve stands out. The brand was launched by Marin Hopper, Dennis Hopper’s daughter from his marriage to Brooke Hayward. Hopper Reserve is a gram of California indoor-grown flower, two packs of rolling papers, a pair of matches and a trading card either [...]

  • Sean Clarke Aardman Staff Photography Bristol.Pic

    Aardman Appoints Sean Clarke as New Managing Director

    Aardman, the Oscar-winning animation studio behind “Chicken Run” and “Early Man,” has appointed Sean Clarke as its new managing director, replacing co-founder David Sproxton, who is stepping down after 43 years. Clarke has worked at the British studio for more than 20 years, including heading the international rights and marketing department for over a decade. [...]

  • The Antenna

    Toronto Film Review: 'The Antenna'

    Jump scares, creepy noises and the tease of hidden-from-view dangers are all fine. But a truly frightening horror film unsettles with more than its crafts, but instead through the vulnerability of defenseless people stuck with bad options only. First-time writer-director Orçun Behram’s highly stylized and mildly disturbing “The Antenna,” a metaphor on Turkey’s current ruling [...]

  • Ad Astra Box Office

    Box Office Battle: 'Ad Astra' Takes on 'Rambo: Last Blood' and 'Downton Abbey'

    “Hustlers” and “Good Boys” proved that even in the age of Marvel dominance and remake mania, movies that don’t exist within an established franchise can still be box office draws. Can “Ad Astra” continue that trend? The space drama — starring Brad Pitt and directed by James Gray — arrives on the big screen this [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content