×
You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

Eye of the Dolphin

There's a pleasantly dreamy quality to much of "Eye of the Dolphin," and that goes a long way toward enabling audiences to ignore the formulaic plot and enjoy the laid-back charms of this innocuous indie. Scenario about a troubled Los Angeles adolescent who gains a sense of purpose at her father's Bahamian research center may have special resonance with tween and teen girls.

With:
Alyssa - Carly Schroeder Hawk - Adrian Dunbar Daniel - George Harris Glinton - Jane Lynch Tamika - Christine Adams Lucy - Katharine Ross Coakly - Rudy Levarity Dekker - Joey Jam Cornelia - Vivica Watkins

There’s a pleasantly dreamy quality to much of “Eye of the Dolphin,” and that goes a long way toward enabling audiences to ignore the formulaic plot and enjoy the laid-back charms of this innocuous indie. Scenario about a troubled Los Angeles adolescent who gains a sense of purpose at her father’s Bahamian research center may have special resonance with tween and teen girls. But it could be difficult to hook that target demographic during the pic’s theatrical run, so “Dolphin” may not net a profit until it swims into ancillary tributaries.

Carly Schroeder, recently effective as a ’70s soccer player in “Gracie,” here plays Alyssa, a rebellious 14-year-old whose proclivity for misbehavior following the death of her mom causes her grandmother, Lucy (Katharine Ross), no end of grief. When Alyssa is expelled from school after being caught smoking pot in the girls’ room, Lucy decides the girl should spend some quality time with the father she’s never known (and always assumed was dead): Hawk (Adrian Dunbar), a Bahamas-based dolphin researcher who’s blissfully unaware that he ever fathered a child.

Talk about bad timing: Alyssa and Lucy arrive unannounced at Hawk’s home base just when he’s struggling to maintain control of the small island’s research center. Hawk wants to focus on studying communication between dolphins, but a snippy rival (Jane Lynch) wants to turn the place into a mini-Sea World.

The father-and-daughter reunion begins on a predictably sour note, despite sweet encouragement from Hawk’s live-in girlfriend (Christine Adams, stunning). But family ties gradually take hold as Alyssa warms to her new environment and befriends a wild dolphin.

Underwater lensing is beautiful throughout, even when it’s obvious a stand-in, or swim-in, is subbing for Schroeder. Shot on location at Port Lucaya on Grand Bahama Island, with many nonpro locals in minor roles, the pic abounds with local color and a mellow vibe. Performances are persuasive across the board, and Schroeder is all the more appealing for having a decidedly nonglam look.

The PG-13 rating, evidently cued by the fleeting scene of pot-smoking, seems unduly harsh, especially since helmer Michael D. Sellers goes to unusual lengths to discourage bad habits. In behind-the-scenes footage shown during the closing credits, Schroeder coughs and sneezes between takes whenever her character puffs on cigarettes of any sort.

Eye of the Dolphin

Production: A Monterey Media release of a Moviebank production in association with 120 dB Films, MB Partners and Goldmill Prods. Produced by Susan Johnson, Michael D. Sellers. Executive producers, Pamela Vlastas, Tre Lovell, Stephen Hayes, Peter Graham, Doug Jewell, Donald A. Barton, Robert Kecskemet, Amy Summer, Peer Oppenheimer. Co-producer, Jacob Moser. Co-executive producers, John Remark, James Via, Robert Fredrik's, Anthony Milan. Directed by Michael D. Sellers. Screenplay, Wendell Morris, Sellers.

Crew: Camera (color), Guy Livneh; editor, Brent Schoenfeld; music, Alan Derian; production designer, Freddie Naff; costume designer, Leslie Yarmo; sound (Dolby Digital), Eugene E. Thompson; assistant director, Jonathan Southard; casting, Matthew Lessall. Reviewed at AMC Studio 30, Aug. 25, 2007. MPAA Rating: PG-13. Running time: 102 MIN.

With: Alyssa - Carly Schroeder Hawk - Adrian Dunbar Daniel - George Harris Glinton - Jane Lynch Tamika - Christine Adams Lucy - Katharine Ross Coakly - Rudy Levarity Dekker - Joey Jam Cornelia - Vivica Watkins

More Film

  • Sauvages

    Claude Barras’ ‘Sauvages’ Pitches Potential Partners at Cannes Film Market

    Claude Barras, director of the breakout Academy Award nominated hit “My Life as a Zucchini,” is returning to stop motion animation for his next feature “Sauvages,” a socially conscious tale set in the jungles of Borneo. Producer Rhea Plangg attended this year’s Cannes Film Market to foster negotiations with potential production partners. “Sauvages,” a working [...]

  • Pop Up Film Residency Announces New

    Pop Up Film Residency Announces New Talents, Partners for 2019

    CANNES–The Pop Up Film Residency, a mentorship program launched this year by former TorinoFilmLab artistic director Matthieu Darras and Slovak producer Juraj Krasnohorsky, has announced three new residents, four new hosts, and two new creative partners for 2019. Based in Bratislava, the program offers a three-week residency in Slovakia each month, along with a series [...]

  • 'Super Pets' Release Date Pushed Back

    Film News Roundup: 'Super Pets' Movie Moves Back a Year, Avoiding 'John Wick 4'

    In today’s film news roundup, “Super Pets” has moved back to 2022, “Into the Ashes” gets bought and veteran executive David Gale has a new gig. RELEASE DATE Warner Bros. has pushed back the release of “DC Super Pets” back a year, avoiding opening against “John Wick 4.” The studio announced Wednesday that “Super Pets” [...]

  • Quentin Tarantino

    Quentin Tarantino Documentary 'QT8: The First Eight' Scores Sales (EXCLUSIVE)

    Wood Entertainment has completed sales for France, Germany, Turkey, Italy and Russia for “QT8: The First Eight,” a documentary that chronicles Quentin Tarantino’s first eight films. The first buyers’ screening took place on Sunday at the Cannes Film Festival. Tarantino’s ninth film, “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood,” premiered at Cannes on Tuesday night. Producer [...]

  • 'Asbury Park' Doc Covers Bruce Springsteen,

    Film Review: 'Asbury Park: Riot, Redemption, Rock 'N Roll'

    A civic Phoenix story is promised and effectively delivered in “Asbury Park: Riot, Redemption, Rock ‘N Roll,” even if there’s little doubt that what much of the audience will be hoping for from this documentary is Bruce, the whole Bruce and nothing but the Bruce. The film satisfies a good portion of that craving with [...]

  • Timothy Olyphant Once Upon a Time

    Timothy Olyphant Explains Why He Did 'Hitman' Movie

    The 2007 film adaptation of the “Hitman” video game franchise is … not good. It received a score of 15% on Rotten Tomatoes, with many critics panning its incoherent plot and terrible dialogue. So, why did actor Timothy Olyphant take on the lead role as Agent 47? He had a mortgage to pay, he told [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content