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See Winners

The Golden Globes spread out the love Monday night, honoring a long-gestating musical, several beloved figures and a long list of British talent.

Trophy winners almost all had familiarity on their side as films based on a play, books, other movies and real life nabbed the Hollywood Foreign Press Assn.’s 64th annual Golden Globes at the Beverly Hilton. Prizes were divided almost evenly between Americans and foreign talent.

With three trophies, including top comedy or musical pic, Paramount/DreamWorks’ “Dreamgirls” — the well-known tuner that drew on Detroit’s musical history — led the way.

The third part of Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu’s trilogy, “Babel,” was chosen best drama, while the stories of Queen Elizabeth, Idi Amin, Boston cops ‘n’ robbers and a Gotham fashion editor received the other top prizes. And, let’s not forget Borat.

The wins only partially focused the Oscar race.

“Dreamgirls,” the legit tuner with many parallels to the story of the Supremes, took a major bow Monday night, and put the spotlight on Eddie Murphy and Jennifer Hudson. Both first-time winners, the two took home awards in the supporting acting categories.

Producer Laurence Mark, in his acceptance speech, shrugged off the fact that it took 25 years to get the pic made, suggesting it only came to fruition “so that these stars could align and (director) Bill Condon would be there to guide them.”

“Dreamgirls” becomes the fourth musical in the last six years to win the comedy or musical best picture; only one of those, “Chicago,” has gone on to win the picture Oscar.

Inarritu’s “Babel,” the leader in noms with seven, won only one award but it was an important one: best picture drama. Structured similarly to his last pic, 2003’s “21 Grams,” pic has been on the top of several critics groups’ lists.

Paramount received the biggest slap on the back: The Viacom company distributed both best picture winners.

In each of the last two years, neither of the top Globe winners has gone on to win the Oscar. For more than three decades prior, the two awards groups lined up often.

Pixar’s “Cars” won the trophy for animated feature film, a new category in the Globes.

“The Queen” was the only other multiple winner, receiving awards for its star Helen Mirren and writer Peter Morgan.

Mirren and her fellow actress winner, Meryl Streep in “The Devil Wears Prada,” secured their position as the front-runners for the femme acting Oscar. For Mirren, it was her first win for a film, having won an actress nod for “Losing Chase” in 1997.

Streep won her sixth Globe, and used her time onstage to laud her fellow actress nominees and chide theater owners that don’t support smaller films.

“This has been a fun year to watch movies because of you gals,” she said after reciting the first names of several actresses. “It makes you want to cry with gratitude — until next year.”

Martin Scorsese, who has won only one Globe, nabbed his second for the star-laden “The Departed.” He previously won in 2003 for “Gangs of New York.”

“The Departed” was based on the 2002 Hong Kong film “Mou Gaan Dou” (“Infernal Affairs”) which Scorsese envisioned “in the Warner Bros. tradition of ‘Public Enemy’ and ‘Angels With Dirty Faces.’ We wound up making ‘Devils With Dirty Faces.’ ”

Forest Whitaker, whose only other Globe nomination was also for the depiction of a real character, Charlie Parker in 1988’s “Bird,” won the actor in a drama trophy, topping Peter O’Toole, Will Smith and Leonardo DiCaprio, who was nominated twice. Whitaker, visibly choked up when he accepted the trophy, portrayed Idi Amin in “The Last King of Scotland.”

On the comedy side, Sacha Baron Cohen (“Borat”) unleashed the evening’s most hilarious — and vile — acceptance speech (see transcript of speech, page 26). He appeared out of the Borat character, which he has used throughout the film’s promotional period.

Clint Eastwood’s “Letters From Iwo Jima” became the first Japanese-language film in 46 years to win the foreign-language category. (“Odd Obsession” was one of five winners in 1960). It leaves the category wide open come Oscar time as “Iwo Jima” is a U.S. production and therefore not eligible. Pic beat “Volver,” “Pan’s Labyrinth,” Apocalypto” and “The Lives of Others.”

Telecast allowed early winners to ramble at length and was quick to cut off speeches as the major awards were being handed out at the end of the evening.

Prince, who arrived late, missed the opportunity to pick up the song trophy for his tune “The Song of the Heart” from “Happy Feet.” It was Prince’s first Globes win.

Frenchman Alexandre Desplat won the score award for “The Painted Veil,” becoming the first European to win the award since Ennio Morricone snared the prize in 2000.

Tom Hanks presented the Cecil B. DeMille Award to Warren Beatty, praising his “balls — and by balls, I mean artistic vision.”

And the winners are…

MOTION PICTURE

DRAMA
“Babel” – Anonymous Content Production/Una Producción De Zeta Film/Central Film Production; Paramount Pictures/Paramount Vantage

ACTRESS (DRAMA)
Helen Mirren – “The Queen”

ACTOR (DRAMA)
Forest Whitaker – “The Last King of Scotland”

MUSICAL OR COMEDY
“Dreamgirls” – DreamWorks Pictures/Paramount Pictures; DreamWorks Pictures/Paramount Pictures

ACTRESS (MUSICAL OR COMEDY)
Meryl Streep – “The Devil Wears Prada”

ACTOR (MUSICAL OR COMEDY)
Sacha Baron Cohen – “Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan”

ANIMATED FILM
“Cars” – Walt Disney Pictures/Pixar Animation Studio; Buena Vista Pictures Distribution

FOREIGN-LANGUAGE FILM
“Letters from Iwo Jima” (USA/Japan) – Warner Bros. Pictures/DreamWorks Pictures; Warner Bros. Pictures

SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Jennifer Hudson – “Dreamgirls”

SUPPORTING ACTOR
Eddie Murphy – “Dreamgirls”

DIRECTOR
Martin Scorsese – “The Departed”

SCREENPLAY
Peter Morgan – “The Queen”

ORIGINAL SCORE
Alexandre Desplat – “The Painted Veil”

ORIGINAL SONG
“The Song of the Heart” – “Happy Feet” – Music & Lyrics by: Prince Rogers Nelson

TELEVISION

DRAMA
“Grey’s Anatomy” (ABC) – Touchstone Television

ACTRESS (DRAMA)
Kyra Sedgwick – “The Closer”

ACTOR (DRAMA)
Hugh Laurie – “House”

COMEDY OR MUSICAL
“Ugly Betty” (ABC) – Touchstone Television

ACTRESS (COMEDY OR MUSICAL)
America Ferrera – “Ugly Betty”

ACTOR (COMEDY OR MUSICAL)
Alec Baldwin – “30 Rock”

MINISERIES OR TV MOVIE
“Elizabeth I” (HBO) – Company Pictures and Channel 4 i.a.w. HBO Films

ACTRESS (MINISERIES OR TV MOVIE)
Helen Mirren – “E
lizabeth I”

ACTOR (MINISERIES OR TV MOVIE)
Bill Nighy – “Gideon’s Daughter”

SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Emily Blunt – “Gideon’s Daughter”

SUPPORTING ACTOR
Jeremy Irons – “Elizabeth I”

CECIL B. DEMILLE AWARD
Warren Beatty