×

CONSTANCE MARIE

What doesn’t the public know about George Lopez that they should?

“He really feels for the underdog and is completely driven — even with 18% kidney function. He gets up at 5 in the morning and does interviews, he’ll rehearse all day with us and then he’ll go into the writing room afterwards. And on weekends, he’ll do standup. It’s like, ‘Man, don’t you ever rest?'”

Is the Latino audience being underrepresented today?

“I think so. I won’t be happy unless there are other shows reflecting a lot more diverse ethnicities, and Latinos in particular. I’d like it to get to the point where it’s not ‘The Latino Show’ or ‘The Black Show’ or ‘The White Show.’ It should be how life is, integrated like life is.”

What’s the most Latino thing about the show?

“The thing that’s the most Latino is the color of our skin, and the beauty of that is we come in every different shade.”

How would you make the show more authentically Latino, the ultimo Latino?

“It’s not a matter of being too Latino or not Latino enough. That’s the reason a lot of shows never succeeded before us, because they’re not enough Latino or they’re too Latino. We just are who we are and we stay true to that.”

BELITA MORENO

What’s the secret to the show’s longevity?

“There’s a real bottom-line honesty about it, and I think it resonates with people, and not just one distinct Latino group. In order for it to have made it to its 100th (episode), there’s obviously other people who relate to the show. Serious issues are dealt with in a real, yet humorous way.”

What’s the most Latino thing about the show?

“This is a very close family. They’re there for each other. When Benny’s house burned down, it was a given that she would move in with them. When Vic had trouble with his place, he moved in with them. You know, that one-for-all-and-all-for-one kind of thing.”

What’s the least Latino thing about the show?

“The roles are not very traditional. Traditionally, in Latino families, the mother holds the house together. But in our family, the Lopez family, it’s sort of all of us pitching in at once, which I think is more American than Latino.”

How would you make the show more authentically Latino, the ultimo Latino?

“I don’t know that I would. I think to make our show more Latino, it wouldn’t be very real for the group that we are reaching out to … and it wouldn’t necessarily be really what happens in this particular family. I mean, the kids don’t even take Spanish. In my house we were forced to take Spanish at school, which doesn’t happen so much anymore.”

VALENTE RODRIGUEZ

What’s the secret to the show’s longevity?

“The writing is really strong. Some of the writers at the beginning weren’t quite familiar with the Latino characters from George’s head but they’ve gotten to know them really well.”

What doesn’t the public know about George Lopez that they should?

“Most people see him as this comic, very confident, throwing insults and doing these characters up onstage, but they don’t realize how much of a caring person he is and how emotional he is sometimes.”

Is the Latino audience being underrepresented today?

“Oh, heck, yeah. What needs to happen is we need to be provided with more opportunity. We don’t need a guarantee of being on the air, but we should get a guarantee of what kind of opportunity we are going to have, especially if our numbers are what they are.”

What’s the least Latino thing about the show?

“I grew up in a large Latino family, and there was a lot of discipline. There were eight kids running around, and you had to follow the rules, so we got spanked a whole bunch. There are a lot of times I’m watching a scene and the kids are doing something and they talk back, and I’m like, ‘Oh, no. That would not have flown in my house.’ “