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The American Film Institute has singled out Clint Eastwood as “a national treasure” for re-counting the Battle of Iwo Jima through opposite sides in “Flags of Our Fathers” and “Letters From Iwo Jima.”

“The films not only complement one another but they resonate together to create one of the great motion experiences of the new century,” the AFI said Wednesday in announcing its “Moments of Significance” awards for 2006.

The AFI included “Letters” but not “Flags” as part of its top 10 films list when it announced those pics on Dec. 10.

AFI also listed the death of Robert Altman, noting, “His body of work – both in film and television – reflects an exceptional diversity in genre but always with his indelible signature.”

Other AFI moments of significance” included:

“The documentary speaks to the world.” The AFI cited “An Inconvenient Truth,” “Iraq in Fragments,” “When the Levees Broke,” “Baghdad ER” and “Combat Hospital” as examples of the power of film and TV to bring people together as a global audience.

“YouTube Redefines ‘The Tube.’ The org asserted that the true cultural phenomenon for 2006 is the dawn of a new era of participatory TV via the PC.

“TV News Migrates to the Internet.” AFI noted flashpoint for this trend came with Stephen Colbert’s speech at the White House correspondents’ dinner.

“VHS is dead, long live the digital future.” The org noted that the legal market for digital downloads of feature films became a reality in 2006.

“Have You No Shame? Television says yes.” AFI cited the cancellation of the O.J. Simpson special shows that a moral standard still exists for TV.

“Networks fight back.” The org noted ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox filed a rare joint challenge to a FCC indecency ruling.

AFI awards were decided by film and TV juries, each made up of 13 critics, artists, scholars and AFI trustees. The org will hold a Jan. 12 awards ceremony at the Four Seasons Hotel in Beverly Hills.