Zhang Si De

"Zhang Si De" relates the saga of the grunt soldier who purportedly drew fond notice from young Chairman Mao and was promoted by Mao to Revolutionary hero after his accidental death. Offshore auds are likely to find results laughably hokey at times, suggesting limited exposure even on the fest circuit.

With:
With: Wu Jun, Tang Guoqiang, Zou Shuang, Sun Yuncheng, Zheng Hao, Ding Kai, Li Wannian, Wang Zihong, Liu Ying.

An unabashed hunk of propaganda that might have been fresh 40 years ago, “Zhang Si De” relates the saga of the grunt soldier who purportedly drew fond notice from young Chairman Mao and was promoted by Mao to Revolutionary hero after his accidental death. In this well-mounted but monotonously inspirational canvas, there’s no room for the subtlety helmer Yin Li demonstrated in “The Story of Xinghua” a decade ago. Offshore auds are likely to find results laughably hokey at times, suggesting limited exposure even on the fest circuit.

The personification of simple-but-goodhearted, Zhang Si De (or Side, as translated here) is a tireless, guileless servant of the cause in apple-cheeked Wu Jun’s performance. An orphaned farm boy, he joined the military in 1933. By start of story during WWII, when the Red Army is busy fighting off Japanese invaders, he’s part of the guard protecting Mao (Tang Guoqiang, offering a predictably idealized portrait). Initially criticized for being too modest to advance himself, Zhang’s selfless zeal — expressed in nonstop opportunities for noble or brave deeds — soon attracts a sort of fatherly patronage from the great leader.

Given that Zhang was never sent to the battlefront (an honor he and others here patriotically pine for), the pic must strain somewhat to provide excuses for the action and spectacle its epic aspirations call for.

Just how closely this follows actual events is anyone’s guess; as with Jesus, the one thing you can say with certainty about Zhang Side is that records confirm he did exist. The rest is speculation shaped by belief and official doctrine.

Eschewing color until the climax (which finds Mao giving his famous “Serve the People” speech at Zhang’s memorial), the pic’s handsome black-and-white lensing adds to the retro feel.

The pic doesn’t build much narrative momentum, but its slick package delivers watchable revolutionary kitsch.

Zhang Si De

China

Production: A China Film Group Corp. and Beijing Film Studio production. Produced by Yang Buting, Zhang Zhenhua. Executive producer, Han Seping. Directed by Yin Li. Screenplay, Liu Heng.

Crew: Camera (color, B&W), Xie Ping, Rao Xiaoling; editor, Zhan Haihong; music, Zou Ye; production designer, Lu Yueling; sound, Zheng Chunyu; Reviewed at World Film Festival (World Cinema), Montreal, Aug. 29, 2005. Running time: 124 MIN.

With: With: Wu Jun, Tang Guoqiang, Zou Shuang, Sun Yuncheng, Zheng Hao, Ding Kai, Li Wannian, Wang Zihong, Liu Ying.

More Film

  • NANTUCKET, MA - JUNE 23: (L-R)

    How Long Will TV and Film's Boom Market for Female Stories Last?

    An unabashed hunk of propaganda that might have been fresh 40 years ago, “Zhang Si De” relates the saga of the grunt soldier who purportedly drew fond notice from young Chairman Mao and was promoted by Mao to Revolutionary hero after his accidental death. In this well-mounted but monotonously inspirational canvas, there’s no room for […]

  • 'Ideal Home' Review: Steve Coogan, Paul

    Film Review: 'Ideal Home'

    An unabashed hunk of propaganda that might have been fresh 40 years ago, “Zhang Si De” relates the saga of the grunt soldier who purportedly drew fond notice from young Chairman Mao and was promoted by Mao to Revolutionary hero after his accidental death. In this well-mounted but monotonously inspirational canvas, there’s no room for […]

  • 'Calibre' Review: A Terrific, Intensely Terrifying

    Edinburgh Film Review: 'Calibre'

    An unabashed hunk of propaganda that might have been fresh 40 years ago, “Zhang Si De” relates the saga of the grunt soldier who purportedly drew fond notice from young Chairman Mao and was promoted by Mao to Revolutionary hero after his accidental death. In this well-mounted but monotonously inspirational canvas, there’s no room for […]

  • CHRIS PRATT stars as Owen in

    Box Office: 'Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom' Gnaws on $144 Million Debut Weekend

    An unabashed hunk of propaganda that might have been fresh 40 years ago, “Zhang Si De” relates the saga of the grunt soldier who purportedly drew fond notice from young Chairman Mao and was promoted by Mao to Revolutionary hero after his accidental death. In this well-mounted but monotonously inspirational canvas, there’s no room for […]

  • Leung Chiu-wai

    Tony Leung Breaks With Wong Kar-wai’s Jettone (Reports)

    An unabashed hunk of propaganda that might have been fresh 40 years ago, “Zhang Si De” relates the saga of the grunt soldier who purportedly drew fond notice from young Chairman Mao and was promoted by Mao to Revolutionary hero after his accidental death. In this well-mounted but monotonously inspirational canvas, there’s no room for […]

  • No Merchandising. Editorial Use Only. No

    ‘Jurassic World’ Holds off ‘Incredibles 2’ in China

    An unabashed hunk of propaganda that might have been fresh 40 years ago, “Zhang Si De” relates the saga of the grunt soldier who purportedly drew fond notice from young Chairman Mao and was promoted by Mao to Revolutionary hero after his accidental death. In this well-mounted but monotonously inspirational canvas, there’s no room for […]

  • shanghai skyline China Placeholder

    Regulators Keep Chinese Film Industry in Suspense

    An unabashed hunk of propaganda that might have been fresh 40 years ago, “Zhang Si De” relates the saga of the grunt soldier who purportedly drew fond notice from young Chairman Mao and was promoted by Mao to Revolutionary hero after his accidental death. In this well-mounted but monotonously inspirational canvas, there’s no room for […]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content