×
You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

The Longest Yard

<B>It's way too early for comparisons to Jack Lemmon and Billy Wilder, or even to Jerry Lewis and Frank Tashlin, but Adam Sandler and helmer Peter Segal can boast yet another solidly commercial collaboration: "The Longest Yard," a shrewdly updated yet surprisingly faithful remake of Robert Aldrich's 1974 football-behind-bars dramedy starring Burt Reynolds. Sandler impressively assumes the Reynolds role here, with strong support by Reynolds himself and a slightly restrained but frequently hilarious Chris Rock. This mass-appeal crowd-pleaser is poised to score sturdy numbers during its opening weekend kick-off. Play-off should be leggy, and followed by huge post-season vid numbers.</B>

With:
Paul Crewe - Adam Sandler Caretaker - Chris Rock Nate Scarborough - Burt Reynolds Meggert - Nelly Warden Hazen - James Cromwell Captain Knauer - William Fichtner Deacon Moss - Michael Irvin Unger - David Patrick Kelly Guard Lambert - Bill Romanowski Battle - Bill Goldberg Guard Garner - Brian Bosworth Guard Engleheart - Kevin Nash Guard Dunham - Steve Austin Switowski - Bob Sapp Turley - Dalip Singh Lynette - Cloris Leachman Brucie - Nicholas Turturro Ms. Tucker - Tracy Morgan Cheeseburger Eddy - Terry Crews Torres - Lobo Sebastian Duane - Ed Lauter

It’s way too early for comparisons to Jack Lemmon and Billy Wilder, or even to Jerry Lewis and Frank Tashlin, but Adam Sandler and helmer Peter Segal can boast yet another solidly commercial collaboration: “The Longest Yard,” a shrewdly updated yet surprisingly faithful remake of Robert Aldrich’s 1974 football-behind-bars dramedy starring Burt Reynolds. Sandler impressively assumes the Reynolds role here, with strong support by Reynolds himself and a slightly restrained but frequently hilarious Chris Rock. This mass-appeal crowd-pleaser is poised to score sturdy numbers during its opening weekend kick-off. Play-off should be leggy, and followed by huge post-season vid numbers.

The second reprise of an Aldrich pic to hit screens in recent months, following underrated and under-performing “Flight of the Phoenix,” “Longest Yard” rarely strays far from the original playbook scripted by Tracy Keenan Wynn (from a story by producer Albert S. Ruddy, who returns as an exec producer for the remake).

Revised screenplay credited to Sheldon Turner — and possibly enhanced by ad-libs from Sandler, Rock and others — allows more room for broader comedy, whichlets Sandler and Segal (reunited after “Anger Management” and “50 First Dates”) play to their strengths. But rough-and-tumble of climactic gridiron match-up between prisoners and guards is scarcely less violent here than in the R-rated original. Only the language appears to have been sanitized (Rock lobs only a single F-bomb) to obtain a PG-13 rating.

Disgraced former NFL quarterback Paul “Wrecking” Crewe (Sandler) rebels against his role as boy-toy for a rich bitch (played, fleetingly but shrewishly, by an unbilled Courteney Cox Arquette) by drunkenly joyriding in her expensive sports car. Violating terms of an earlier five-year probation for his role in a point-shaving scheme, Crewe winds up in a Texas federal penitentiary.

Warden Hazen (James Cromwell), a football fanatic with political ambitions, wants Crewe to help coach his semi-pro team of prison guards. But Captain Knauer (William Fichtner), the turf-conscious player-coach of the guards, makes it known he doesn’t want Crewe’s help.

Out among the prison population, Crewe gets an even frostier reception. Caretaker (Rock), a wheeler-dealer convict who befriends the otherwise friendless newcomer, explains: The convicts will forgive rape, murder, grand theft auto or writing bad checks, but shaving points in a football game crosses the line. It’s “un-American,” Caretaker says.

With a little help from grizzled sage Nate Scarborough (Reynolds), another NFL veteran doing hard time, Crewe recruits a team of inmates for a practice game against the guards. Joining up are Deacon Moss (former Dallas Cowboy Michael Irvin), Brucie (Nicholas Turturro) and Torres (Lobo Sebastian).

Rapper Nelly and pro wrestler Bill Goldberg also figure prominently on a team that defies the odds during the climactic, brutally funny half-hour grudge match. As in the original, for Crewe, the game is a shot at redemption. For his players, it’s a chance to take a shot at the guards.

In its time, the original “Yard” was viewed by many as an ersatz companion piece to Aldrich’s 1967 “The Dirty Dozen,” underscoring similarities between criminal behavior and socially sanctioned violence.

Segal’s “Yard” doesn’t place much emphasis on subtext, although it makes some sharp satirical points by having the game attract national TV attention and several real-life sports commentators. (ESPN gets cable broadcast rights.) New version’s final game, though sufficiently brutal, gets a lot more laughs than the earlier edition. Indeed, the remake as whole arguably is a slight improvement over the original, given its somewhat more disciplined tonal consistency.

Still, new pic is so faithful to its source that one major second-act plot development may be genuinely shocking to contemporary viewers (even those who have seen the original).

The final scene effectively reprises the finish of the original, right down to certain camera angles, with one novel twist: a quick cutaway to reaction shot of smiling Burt Reynolds, who appears in context to be granting his blessing to entire project.

Sandler smartly balances the script’s mix of cynicism and sentiment in his ingratiating lead performance. (And he’s physically persuasive as an ex-quarterback.) Reynolds’ subtlety is a nifty balance to Rock’s sarcasm. Cromwell provides an effective menacing counterbalance as the all-powerful warden.

Fichtner, Turturro, Tracy Morgan (as a saucy transvestite), Cloris Leachman (as a batty, horny secretary) and David Patrick Kelly (as a creepy squealer) are stand-outs among the supporting cast. Irvin effortlessly exudes natural screen presence — as does sportscaster Jim Rome in a cameo. Look for Ed Lauter (the player-coach in ’74 “Yard”) in a wink-wink walk-on bit.

Slick tech package includes Dean Semler’s ace lensing at the defunct Santa Fe State Penitentiary. Soundtrack includes many familiar pop standards, including the Hollies’ “Long Cool Woman (in a Black Dress)” (cleverly employed for the training sequence).

In a 2001 remake of the same material, footballer-turned-actor Vinnie Jones played an imprisoned ex-soccer star who leads convicts against guards in Barry Skolnick’s “Mean Machine.”

Popular on Variety

The Longest Yard

Production: A Paramount Pictures release (in the U.S.) of a Paramount Pictures and Columbia Pictures presentation of a Happy Madison/MTV Film production in association with Callahan Filmworks. Produced by Jack Giarraputo. Executive producers, Adam Sandler, Van Toffler, David Gale, Barry Bernardi, Allen Covert, Tim Herlihy, Michael Ewing, Albert S. Ruddy. Co-producer, Heather Parry. Directed by Peter Segal. Screenplay, Sheldon Turner, based on the film written by Tracy Keenan Wynn from a story by Albert S. Ruddy.

Crew: Camera (Deluxe color), Dean Semler; editor, Jeff Gourson; music, Teddy Castellucci; music supervisor, Michael Dilbeck; production designer, Perry Andelin Blake; supervising art director, Alan Au; art director, Domenic Silvestri; set decorator, Gary Fettis; costume designer, Ellen Lutter; sound (Dolby Digital/DTS/SDDS), Thomas Causey; associate producers, Kevin Grady, Marc C. Ganis; assistant director, John Hockridge; second unit directors, Doug Coleman, Dan Sweetman, Perry Blake; casting, John Papsidera. Reviewed at Edwards Greenway Palace 24, Houston, May 11, 2005. MPAA Rating: PG-13. Running time: 113 MIN.

With: Paul Crewe - Adam Sandler Caretaker - Chris Rock Nate Scarborough - Burt Reynolds Meggert - Nelly Warden Hazen - James Cromwell Captain Knauer - William Fichtner Deacon Moss - Michael Irvin Unger - David Patrick Kelly Guard Lambert - Bill Romanowski Battle - Bill Goldberg Guard Garner - Brian Bosworth Guard Engleheart - Kevin Nash Guard Dunham - Steve Austin Switowski - Bob Sapp Turley - Dalip Singh Lynette - Cloris Leachman Brucie - Nicholas Turturro Ms. Tucker - Tracy Morgan Cheeseburger Eddy - Terry Crews Torres - Lobo Sebastian Duane - Ed LauterWith: Courteney Cox Arquette, Jim Rome, Dan Patrick, Chris Berman, Rob Schneider.

More Film

  • Zeroville

    Film Review: 'Zeroville'

    I’m tired of hearing how some novels are “impossible to adapt.” Balderdash! Just because some books don’t lend themselves to being translated from page to screen doesn’t mean that the attempt ought not to be made. Just ask James Franco, who’s shown a speed freak’s determination to tackle some of the unlikeliest literary adaptations of [...]

  • Red Penguins review

    Toronto Film Review: 'Red Penguins'

    “Red Penguins” is a cautionary tale with particular resonance in the context of our current bizarre intertwining with Russia, the country that interfered in the last U.S. presidential election and is led by the POTUS’ apparent BFF. This wild tale of attempted transnational commerce just after the demise of the USSR in the 1990s chronicles [...]

  • Danny Ramirez'On My Block' TV show

    Danny Ramirez to Star in Film Adaptation of 'Root Letter' Video Game (EXCLUSIVE)

    An English-language film adaptation of Japanese video game “Root Letter,” starring Danny Ramirez, is in production in the U.S. through Akatsuki Entertainment USA. Besides Ramirez (“Top Gun: Maverick,” “Assassination Nation”), the film stars Keana Marie (“Huge in France,” “Live in Pieces”) and Lydia Hearst (“The Haunting of Sharon Tate,” “Z Nation”). With a screenplay by [...]

  • Screen writer Beau WillimonMary Queen of

    Beau Willimon Re-Elected as President of Writers Guild of America East

    Beau Willimon, the playwright and showrunner who launched Netflix’s “House of Cards,” has been re-elected without opposition to a two-year term as president of the Writers Guild of America East. Willimon also ran unopposed in 2017 to succeed Michael Winship. Kathy McGee was elected to the vice president slot over Phil Pilato. Secretary-treasurer Bob Schneider [...]

  • Running With the Devil review

    Film Review: 'Running With the Devil'

    A retired Navy SEAL who for a time was a military advisor on the Colombian drug trade, Jason Cabell conceived his first solo feature as writer-director to tell the story of that particular commerce “from the point of view of the drugs.” The result isn’t exactly a docudrama indictment like “Traffic,” a thriller a la [...]

  • Sweetheart review

    Blumhouse's 'Sweetheart' Sets October Digital Release From Universal (EXCLUSIVE)

    After making waves at this year’s Sundance Film Festival, the Blumhouse project “Sweetheart” is set to hit digital and on demand platforms. Universal Pictures Home Entertainment will offer the film on all major streaming hubs and paid video on demand come Oct. 22, unleashing the creature feature which stars Kiersey Clemons in a harrowing tale [...]

  • Bob OdenkirkAFI Awards Luncheon, Los Angeles,

    Bob Odenkirk to Star in Thriller 'Nobody'

    “Better Call Saul” star Bob Odenkirk has signed on to star in the thriller “Nobody.” The Universal pic follows Hutch Mansell (Odenkirk), a suburban dad, overlooked husband, nothing neighbor — a “nobody.” When two thieves break into his home one night, Hutch’s unknown long-simmering rage is ignited and propels him on a brutal path that [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content