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Haneke’s ‘Hidden’ finds top EFA nods

Pic wins film, director, actor awards

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Michael Haneke’s “Hidden” won the top prizes at the 18th European Film Awards in Berlin Saturday, including best film, director and actor for thesp Daniel Auteuil.

Pic, a French-Austrian-German-Italian co-production, had been the favorite in the competition, which also included Cannes festival winner “The Child,” Marc Rothemund’s “Sophie Scholl — The Final Days,” Wim Wenders’ “Don’t Come Knocking,” Susanne Bier’s “Brothers” and Pawel Pawlikowski’s “My Summer of Love.”

The enigmatic thriller, which won Haneke director kudos at Cannes, follows a couple, played by Auteuil and Juliette Binoche, menaced by mysterious videotapes in a story that ultimately addresses the issue of France’s collective guilt over its former colony of Algeria. Pic also nabbed the editing prize and the Critics’ Award.

Julia Jentsch won the actress trophy for the title role in “Sophie Scholl — The Final Days,” about the real-life dissident who, along with her brother Hans, was executed by the Nazis. The film is this year’s German candidate for the foreign-language film Oscar.

Jentsch and Rothemund, who won Silver Bears at the Berlinale in February, also picked up the audience prizes for actress and director.

Orlando Bloom, who did not attend, nabbed the audience prize for his perf in Ridley Scott’s “Kingdom of Heaven.”

Sean Connery was on hand to collect a lifetime achievement award for a career spanning more than 50 years. Accepting the statuette from Jean-Jacques Annaud, who directed him in “The Name of the Rose,” the 75-year-old Scottish actor used the occasion to push for Scottish sovereignty, saying he wished he could be accepting the prize “as if Scotland was independent and had a voice in Europe.”

The non-European film award went to George Clooney’s “Good Night, and Good Luck.”

Some 1,200 guests attended the low-key show in Berlin’s grungy Arena concert hall.

Poking fun at the ceremony’s budgetary shortcomings, European Film Academy president Wim Wenders and EFA deputy chairman Dieter Kosslick donned aprons and worked the buffet tables as part of a running gag that struggled to connect European film with Euro cuisine. However, presenters’ culinary jokes and analogies fell flatter than a French crepe.

View complete list

BERLIN – Michael Haneke’s “Hidden” (“Cache”) won the top prizes at the 18th European Film Awards in Berlin Saturday (Dec. 3), including best film, director and actor for thesp Daniel Auteuil.

Pic, a French-Austrian-German-Italian co-production, had been the favorite in the competition, which also included Cannes festival winner “The Child,” Marc Rothemund’s “Sophie Scholl – The Final Days,” Wim Wenders’ “Don’t Come Knocking,” Susanne Bier’s “Brothers” and Pawel Pawlikowski’s “My Summer of Love.”

The enigmatic thriller, which won Haneke director kudos in Cannes, follows a couple, played by Auteuil and Juliette Binoche, menaced by mysterious videotapes in a story which ultimately addresses the issue of France’s collective guilt over its former colony of Algeria. Pic also nabbed the editing prize and the Critics’ Award.

Julia Jentsch won best actress for the title role in “Sophie Scholl – The Final Days,” about the real-life dissident who, along with her brother Hans, was executed by the Nazi regime. The film is this year’s German candidate for the best foreign film Oscar.

Jentsch and Rothemund, who won Silver Bears at the Berlinale in February, also picked up the audience prizes for actress and director.

Orlando Bloom, who did not attend, nabbed the audience prize for his role in Ridley Scott’s “Kingdom of Heaven.”

Sean Connery was on hand to collect a lifetime achievement award for a career spanning more than 50 years. Accepting the statuette from Jean-Jacques Annaud, who directed him in “The Name Of The Rose,” the 75-year-old Scottish actor used the occasion to push for Scottish sovereignty, saying he wished he could be accepting the prize, “as if Scotland was independent and had a voice in Europe.”

The non-European film award went to George Clooney’s “Good Night, and Good Luck.”

Some 1,200 guests attended the low-key show, which was held in Berlin’s grungy Arena concert hall.

Poking fun at the ceremony’s budgetary shortcomings, European Film Academy president Wim Wenders and EFA deputy chairman and Berlinale topper Dieter Kosslick donned aprons and worked the buffet tables as part of a running gag-motif that struggled to connect European film with European cuisine, with presenters’ culinary jokes and analogies falling flatter than Italian pizzas and French crepes.

18th EUROPEAN FILM AWARDS

EUROPEAN FILM
“Hidden,” Michael Haneke (France/Austria/Germany/Italy)

EUROPEAN DIRECTOR
Michael Haneke, “Hidden” (France/Austria/Germany/Italy)

EUROPEAN ACTRESS
Julia Jentsch, “Sophie Scholl – The Final Days” (Germany)

EUROPEAN ACTOR
Daniel Auteuil, “Hidden” (France/Austria/Germany/Italy)

EUROPEAN SCREENWRITER
Hany Abu-Assad & Bero Beyer, “Paradise Now”(Netherlands/Israel/Germany/France)

EUROPEAN CINEMATOGRAPHER
Franz Lustig, “Don’t Come Knocking” (Germany)

EUROPEAN COMPOSER
Rupert Gregson-Williams & Andrea Guerra, “Hotel Rwanda” (UK/South Africa/Italy)

EUROPEAN EDITOR
Michael Hudecek & Nadine Muse, “Hidden” (France/Austria/Germany/Italy)

EUROPEAN PRODUCTION DESIGNER
Aline Bonetto, “A Very Long Engagement,” (France)

EUROPEAN FILM ACADEMY LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD
Sean Connery

EUROPEAN ACHIEVEMENT IN WORLD CINEMA
Maurice Jarre

EUROPEAN FILM ACADEMY DISCOVERY – Prix Fassbinder
“Accused,” Jakob Thuesen (Denmark)

EUROPEAN FILM ACADEMY CRITICS AWARD – Prix Fipresci
“Hidden,” Michael Haneke (France/Austria/Germany/Italy)

EUROPEAN FILM ACADEMY DOCUMENTARY – Prix ARTE
“The Pipeline Next Door,” Nino Kirtadze (France)

EUROPEAN FILM ACADEMY SHORT FILM – Prix UIP
“Undressing My Mother,” Ken Wardrop (Ireland)

EUROPEAN FILM ACADEMY NON-EUROPEAN FILM – Prix Screen International
“Good Night, And Good Luck,” George Clooney (U.S.)

THE JAMESON PEOPLE’S CHOICE AWARDS

EUROPEAN DIRECTOR
Marc Rothemund, “Sophie Scholl – The Final Days” (Germany)

EUROPEAN ACTOR
Orlando Bloom, “Kingdom of Heaven” (U.K./Spain/U.S./Germany)

EUROPEAN ACTRESS
Julia Jentsch, “Sophie Scholl – The Final Days” (Germany)

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