×
You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

Mix

Aspiring L.A. club deejay connects with his roots and himself in contempo Budapest. Though enthusiastic and tangibly sincere, ambitious pic is too often driven by disruptive coincidence and emphasizes an unharmonious porn/bondage plot strand that shouldn't shock Euro auds but reps an obstacle to mainstream play Stateside.

With:
With: Alex Weed, Janos Kulka, Jeffrey Schecter, Olga Koos, Dorka Gryllus, Krisztian Kolovratnik, Peter Rudolf. (English and Hungarian dialogue)

Corrections were made to this review on Feb. 9, 2004.

Old Europe gets a new rhythm in “Mix,” in which an aspiring L.A. club deejay connects with his roots and himself in contempo Budapest. Though enthusiastic and tangi-bly sincere, ambitious pic is too often driven by disruptive coincidence and emphasizes an unharmonious porn/bondage plot strand that shouldn’t shock Euro auds but reps an obstacle to mainstream play Stateside. Still, autobiographical dimension of story will garner some fest invites: Pic garnered Best First Film and Best Editor awards at Hungarian Film Week. Bouncy pace, plethora of techno tracks and skin should attract cable and homevid buyers.

Seventeen-year-old deejay Mitch (Alex Weed) would much rather spin his “scratch tables” and pleasure himself to Internet porn than practice classical piano for the impending Julliard audition his Hungarian immigrant father Peter (Janos Kulka) has been working toward the boy’s whole life.

Only days before Mitch’s test, Peter receives word that his estranged father has died in Budapest. Peter and Mitch fly to the old country, where Mitch immediately bonds with elderly yet elegant grandmother Klara (Olga Koos), even as Peter storms out over the same unspecified conflict that drove him away decades before.

With only one night out in the Hungarian capital before flying back to America, Mitch promptly loses his money to rap-loving cabby Lou (Jeffrey Schecter), a New Jersey native who initially poses as a local. Later Mitch is tossed out of a brothel after glimpsing Bea (Dorka Gryllus), the online bondage model he’d first noticed while Web surfing at home.

He reconnects with Lou, misses his flight, and has only days to scrape together the coin for a return ticket to make his audition. To get the money, Lou throws a massive rave in a conveniently empty theater, even as he’s working through his feelings for Bea, confronting her junkie photog b.f. Csaba (Krisztian Kolovratnik) and outsmarting Internet porn ring boss Zoltan (Peter Rudolf).

Leavening its blunt crudity with a can-do spirit, pic is billed as “a Lovy brothers film” and draws inspiration from the family history of helmer-scripter Steven Lovy (1990 cult romp “Circuitry Man”) and production-art director Robert Lovy, both of whom currently call Budapest home.

Disparate perf styles mix well, with Koos’ emotional monologue and denouement pic’s emotionally satisfying core. Some tightening of the rough stuff would streamline Mitch’s odyssey while broadening general appeal.

Tech credits are competent, with muscular sound mix socking across techno tunes. Brief Southern California sequences were actually shot in Budapest, and bursts of Hungarian dialogue add veracity without impeding storyline. Pic preems domestically Feb. 19, with other Eastern Euro releases already skedded.

Mix

U.S.-Hungary

Production: An SPI Intl. release (in Hungary) of a mixpix (Los Angeles)/HCC Happy Crew Co. (Budapest) production. Produced by Robert Lovy, Steven Lovy, Jozsef Cirko. Directed, written, edited by Steven Lovy.

Crew: Camera (color), Janos Vecsernyes; music, Timothy Kelly; production designer, Robert Lovy; costume designer, Reka Pinter; sound (Dolby Digital), Attila Madaras. Reviewed at Hungarian Film Week (competing), Budapest, Jan. 31, 2004. Running time: 99 MIN.

With: With: Alex Weed, Janos Kulka, Jeffrey Schecter, Olga Koos, Dorka Gryllus, Krisztian Kolovratnik, Peter Rudolf. (English and Hungarian dialogue)

More Film

  • MoviePass card

    MoviePass Has Lost Over 90% of Its Subscribers in Less Than a Year (Report)

    MoviePass users apparently hit the exits en masse after it scaled back the number of movies users could see each month: The flailing cinema-subscription provider has seen its subscriber rolls plunge from a peak of more than 3 million to just 225,000 in under a year, according to a new report. The numbers were reported [...]

  • Sundance Film 'Midnight Family' Sells Domestic

    Sundance Award Winner 'Midnight Family' Sells Domestic Rights to 1091 (EXCLUSIVE)

    “Midnight Family,” an award winning documentary about the struggles of a family in Mexico City, has sold its North American distribution rights to 1091. The indie studio was previously known as the Orchard, but received a new moniker after it was sold by Sony Music Entertainment to a new investment group in January. 1091 plans [...]

  • Villains - Maika Monroe Bill Skarsgard

    SXSW Comedy Thriller 'Villains' Acquired by Gunpowder & Sky, MoviePass for U.S. Release

    Dark comedy thriller “Villains,” which premiered last month at the SXSW Film Festival, has been acquired for U.S. release by Gunpowder & Sky in association with MoviePass’ film division. G&S and MoviePass Films plans to give “Villains” a theatrical release this summer, after buying the rights from The Realm, Bron Studios genre arm. The film [...]

  • General Delegate of the Cannes Film

    Cannes Reinstates Advance Press Screenings, But Favors TV, Radio Journalists (EXCLUSIVE)

    Following last year’s backlash by film critics over changes to its screenings schedule, the Cannes Film Festival has decided to reinstate morning press screenings for movies having their gala world premieres in the evening. But there’s a catch: Only a few hundred journalists — mainly from TV and radio outlets — will be admitted, and [...]

  • Someone Great

    Film Review: ‘Someone Great’

    There simply aren’t enough modern romantic comedies that cherish the merits of female friendship in the aftermath of a romantic breakup. There are even fewer that feel like a personal, lived-in experience. Female-driven raunchcoms (like “Girls Trip”) have explored this territory to a certain extent, though many stop short of delivering genuine poignancy (like “Rough [...]

  • Actresses take part in the #metoo

    Cannes Grows More Inclusive, Boosts Number of Female Filmmakers

    In 1946, the inaugural year of the Cannes Film Festival, Barbara Virginia’s surrealist film, “Tres dias sem Deus” debuted in competition. Over the subsequent seven decades, as it has grown in stature to become one of the world’s premier film gatherings, Cannes hasn’t matched that early promise in highlighting female artists. Finally, the powers that [...]

  • Rocketman

    Cannes: 2019 Lineup Includes 'Rocketman' and Films by 13 Women

    The 72nd Cannes Film Festival has announced its lineup, unveiling an official selection that includes 13 female filmmakers, a number of genre movies, more American titles than last year and an opportunity for Elton John to make a star turn on the Croisette. Twelve of the 47 films announced Thursday are directed by women (one [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content