×
You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

Nicholas and Alexandra

History records that Nicholas II met his death at the hands of a Bolshevik firing squad during the Russian Revolution. As composer Drattell would have it, however, Russia's final royalty fell victims to terminal boredom, shared by an undemonstrative crowd that thinned markedly during the three excruciating hours of her latest operatic venture.

With:
Czar Nicholas II - Rodney Gilfry Empress Alexandra - Nancy Gustafson Rasputin - Placido Domingo Anastasia - Jessica Rivera Alexis - Jonathan Price Nagorny - Vitallj Kowaljow Empress Maria - Suzanna Guzman

History records that Nicholas II, the last czar of Russia, met his death — along with the Empress Alexandra and their five children — at the hands of a Bolshevik firing squad during the Russian Revolution. As composer Deborah Drattell would have it, however, Russia’s final royalty fell victims to terminal boredom, shared by an undemonstrative crowd that thinned markedly during the three excruciating hours of her latest operatic venture, commissioned by the Los Angeles Opera and given its world premiere Sunday.

For Brooklyn-born Drattell, a string of less-than-rapturous receptions to previous operas (most recently “Lilith,” produced by New York City Opera in November 2001) seems not to have cooled her creative ardor. “Nicholas and Alexandra,” with a text by Nicholas von Hoffman unrelated to Robert K. Massie’s book of that name (filmed by Franklin J. Schaffner in 1970), deploys a populous and lavishly costumed cast (38 separate sung roles) across Robert Israel’s tricky, oversized sets (sliding panels, scrims, the works). Everything pleases the eye; little beguiles the ear.

Who are these people — Russia’s bumbling, ineffective last ruler, the conniving pseudo-monk who holds the royal family in his thrall, the loving but put-upon empress, the plotters and sub-plotters who bring about their nation’s downfall? Nothing in Drattell’s moaning, groaning, over-embroidered score provides answers.

The composer has had the resource to provide her one superstar — tenor Placido Domingo, adventurously but wrong-headedly cast as the hypnotic Rasputin — with loud and applause-worthy vocal lines. What’s missing — fatally so — is any sense of music defining personality, character or motivation. The dense, tuneless, pseudo-high-Russian-romantic smog of a score, interlaced with solemn chanting from the chorus behind the scrim, resolving toward the end into a pretty good Bach pastiche, might just as well serve a whole other set of characters in another time and place.

Clearly, the venture represents hard work. On the podium, Russian cellist-conductor Mstislav Rostropovich manages to impart some sense of movement to the proceedings. But that movement is, at best, sporadic; one rhythmic figure (TOM-ta-ta TOM-ta-ta) becomes an obsession early on, and then a downright nag.

Rodney Gilfry is Nicholas, Nancy Gustafson is Alexandra; both are capable singers mired in weak-tea characters with music to match. As the hemophilia-racked Tsarevitch Alexis, the opera’s one potentially sympathetic character, boy soprano Jonathan Price gets to wail “Mamma” now and then, but little else.

Director Anne Bogart, an old Drattell hand, has brought along SITI, her 10-member company of mimes, to push things around on the stage and contribute one more semblance of movement to the mostly motionless affair.

Nicholas and Alexandra

Dorothy Chandler Pavilion; 3,098 seats, $170 top

Production: Los Angeles Opera presents an opera in three acts, with music by Deborah Drattell and text by Nicholas von Hoffman. Conductor, Mstislav Rostropovich, with the Los Angeles Opera Orchestra and Chorus. Staged by Anne Bogart. Sets, Robert Israel; costumes, Catherine Zuber; lighting, Christopher Akerlind. Opened, reviewed Sept. 14, 2003; runs through Sept. 27. With Margaret Thompson, Terri Hill, Michelle Fournier, Javier Cortes, Lorraine Ernest, Kate Aldrich, Michael Gallup, Joseph Frank, James Creswell, David Babinet, Gary Rideout, Gregorio Gonzalez, Jonathan Mack, Sara Campbell, Renee Sousa, Laura Swanson, Virenia Lind, Aleta Braxton, Helene Quintana, Natalie Beck, Christina Borgioli, Christie Lynn Lawrence, Robert Hovencamp, George Sterne, Mark Kelley, Maryanne Mancini, John Kimberling, Marjorie Curtsinger, Jennifer Wallace, Stephen Arel, David Schnell.

Cast: Czar Nicholas II - Rodney Gilfry Empress Alexandra - Nancy Gustafson Rasputin - Placido Domingo Anastasia - Jessica Rivera Alexis - Jonathan Price Nagorny - Vitallj Kowaljow Empress Maria - Suzanna Guzman

More Legit

  • Laurie Metcalf, John Lithgow'Hillary and Clinton'

    Why John Lithgow Worried About Starring in Broadway's 'Hillary and Clinton'

    When Lucas Hnath first conceived of “Hillary and Clinton” in 2008, he was writing for and about a very different America. Now, a total reimagining of the show has made its way to Broadway with Laurie Metcalf and John Lithgow in the titular roles. At the opening on Thursday night, the cast and creatives talked [...]

  • Three Sisters review

    London Theater Review: 'Three Sisters'

    Ennui has become exhaustion in playwright Cordelia Lynn’s new version of “Three Sisters.” The word recurs and recurs. Everyone on the Prozorov estate is worn out; too “overworked” to do anything but sit around idle. Are they killing time or is time killing them? Either way, a play often framed as a study of boredom [...]

  • Patrick Page, Amber Grey, Eva Noblezada,

    'Hadestown' Took 12 Years to Get to Broadway, but It's More Relevant Than Ever

    When “Hadestown” was first staged as a tiny, DIY theater project in Vermont, those involved could never have predicted that it was the start of a 12-year journey to Broadway — or how painfully relevant it would be when it arrived. At Wednesday night’s opening at the Walter Kerr Theatre, the cast and creatives discussed [...]

  • Hillary and Clinton review

    Broadway Review: Laurie Metcalf and John Lithgow in 'Hillary and Clinton'

    If anyone could play Hillary Clinton, it’s Laurie Metcalf – and here she is, in Lucas Hnath’s “Hillary and Clinton,” giving a performance that feels painfully honest and true. And if anyone could capture Bill Clinton’s feckless but irresistible charm, that would be John Lithgow – and here he is, too. Who better to work [...]

  • Hadestown review

    Broadway Review: 'Hadestown'

    “Hadestown” triggered a lot of buzz when this wholly American show (which came to the stage by way of a concept album) premiered at Off Broadway’s New York Theatre Workshop in 2016. Arriving on Broadway with its earthly delights more or less intact, this perfectly heavenly musical — with book, music and lyrics by Anaïs [...]

  • Burn This review

    Broadway Review: Adam Driver, Keri Russell in 'Burn This'

    The ache for an absent artist permeates Lanford Wilson’s “Burn This,” now receiving a finely-tuned Broadway revival that features incendiary performances by Adam Driver and Keri Russell, playing two lost souls in a powerful and passionate dance of denial. AIDS is never mentioned in this 1987 play, yet the epidemic and the profound grief that [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content