×
You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

Totem: The Return of the G’psgolox Pole

The efforts by the Haisla people of northwestern British Columbia to recover a sacred totem pole are observed with soporific cool by vet Canadian documaker Gil Cardinal. Better suited for the tube than the cinema. Until some 11 minutes are trimmed off odd 70-minute length, tube play will be contained to Canada and Europe.

The efforts by the Haisla people of northwestern British Columbia to recover a sacred totem pole are observed with soporific cool by vet Canadian documaker Gil Cardinal in “Totem: The Return of the G’psgolox Pole.” Better suited for the tube than the cinema, and framed as a routine educational piece, pic fails to stir viewers’ anger that the Haisla are faced with unfair obstacles to getting what’s theirs. Until some 11 minutes are trimmed off odd 70-minute length — and they easily could be — tube play will be contained to Canada and Europe.

The Haisla’s dilemma began in 1872, when a pole more than 45 feet tall was raised by Chief G’psgolox’s people honoring his village’s dead, and later sold to Sweden. Housed in Stockholm’s National Museum of Ethnography, the pole was claimed by the Haisla in 1991, but Sweden required the tribe to erect a museum to protect it back home. Deal’s condition conflicts with tribal ritual, which lets collapsed poles decay untouched, but tribal leaders bow to pressure. Adding insult to injury, funding shortages have delayed the museum, so the Haisla still don’t have their pole back.

Totem: The Return of the G’psgolox Pole

Canada

  • Production: A National Film Board of Canada presentation and production. (International sales: National Film Board of Canada, Saint-Laurent, Quebec.) Produced by Bonnie Thompson, Jerry Krepakevich. Executive producer, Greydon McCrea. Directed, written by Gil Cardinal.
  • Crew: Camera (color, digital Betacam), Daron Donahue; editor, Marke Slipp; music, Clode Hamelin. Reviewed at Toronto Film Festival (Perspective Canada), Sept. 11, 2003. (Also in Vancouver Film Festival.) Running time: 70 MIN.
  • With: <b>With:</b> Louise Barbetti, Cecil Paul, Louisa Smith, Per Kaks, Gerald Amos, Dan Paul, Henry Robertson, Derek Wilson.
  • Music By: