×
You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

Save It for Later

"Save It for Later" appears to be the misguided storywriting mantra fed to makers of this listless indie drama, which plods along almost wholly free of colorful incident, narrative muscle or character development. "Later" never really arrives, in terms of payoff or catharsis.

With:
With: Scott Cooper, Gabrielle Anwar, Theresa Russell, Craig Sheffer, Tommy Hinkley, Charles Esten, Jamison Jones.

“Save It for Later” appears to be the misguided storywriting mantra fed to makers of this listless indie drama, which plods along almost wholly free of colorful incident, narrative muscle or character development. “Later” never really arrives, in terms of payoff or catharsis. Recognizable cast names might get helmer-coscenarist Clark Brigham’s maiden feature modest tube/tape exposure, but tale of an angry young man coping — after a fashion — with lingering adolescent trauma is too tepid to stir distrib excitement.

Long prologue has teen Jake running away from hometown San Francisco after an improbable armed encounter between his strict dad (a poor perf by Tommy Hinkley) and the older, boho-artist mentor (Craig Sheffer) he disapproves of. Years later, adult Jake (Scott Cooper) returns, albeit without informing dad or mom (Theresa Russell). Instead, he procrastinates, occasionally spying on them while killing time with a bartending job, taking up painting once again, and romancing the landlady (Gabrielle Anwar). Precious little happens, in either plot or of human-interest. Russell has one good scene toward end; other older thesps are overwrought, younger ones OK given sketchy material. Tech aspects are adequate.

Save It for Later

Production: An Ananda Films production. Produced by Richard Taylor, Sara Garr, Clark Brigham, Michael Crawford. Executive producer, Justine Miner. Directed by Clark Brigham. Screenplay, Brigham, Richard Taylor.

Crew: Camera (color), Barry Stone; editor, Megan Agosto; music, Daniel Thomas; production designer, Chuck Voelter. Reviewed at San Francisco Film Festival, April 26, 2003. Running time: 98 MIN.

With: With: Scott Cooper, Gabrielle Anwar, Theresa Russell, Craig Sheffer, Tommy Hinkley, Charles Esten, Jamison Jones.

More Film

  • Lucas (Jonah Hauer-King) and Bella (Amber)

    China's Bona Film Boards Brad Pitt's 'Ad Astra,' 'A Dog's Way Home' (EXCLUSIVE)

    China’s Bona Film Group is co-financing Brad Pitt space adventure “Ad Astra,” one of several films in a strong slate of international movies the company plans to release in the Middle Kingdom over the next year. Bona has also acquired Roland Emmerich’s war spectacular “Midway” and is investing in “A Dog’s Way Home,” the sequel [...]

  • Aquaman 2018

    Film News Roundup: 'Aquaman' Sets Pre-Sales Record

    In today’s film news roundup, “Aquaman” sets a pre-sales record, “Bohemian Rhapsody” hits a milestone, and SAG-AFTRA promotes four executives.  PRE-SALES RECORD “Aquaman” has set a pre-sales record for Atom Tickets, topping “Deadpool 2,” “Avengers: Infinity War,” and “Black Panther.” “Clearly, ‘Aquaman’ has captured the attention of movie fans with its larger-than-life adventure that must [...]

  • 'Liga' Kicks Off At Ventana Sur's

    Ventana Sur: 'La Liga' Kicks Off at Buenos Aires' Animation!

    Spain’s Quirino Awards, Argentina’s Animation! and Mexico’s Pixelatl Festival, three key events in Ibero-American animation, will join forces to create La Liga (The League), as announced Wednesday at an Animation! round table hosted by the Quirino Awards, titled “Iberoamerican Alliance Models.” Speakers included Quirino Awards promoter José Luis Farias, Mexico’s Pixelatl director José Iñesta, Gonzalo [...]

  • The Quake Review

    Film Review: 'The Quake'

    Roar Uthaug’s 2015 “The Wave” revived the pleasures of the 1970s disaster-movie cycle in a form that seemed purer than the never-quite-dead genre’s recent Stateside incarnations — most of which seem to involve Dwayne Johnson in a generic pileup of CGI perils. “The Wave” wasn’t high art, but it was entertainment that delivered some standard [...]

  • The Mule trailer

    Film Review: Clint Eastwood in 'The Mule'

    From Dirty Harry to … dirty grandpa, Clint Eastwood certainly has a type of character that he plays best, and “The Mule” finds him squarely in his comfort zone, appearing as a surly old horticulturalist who, at age 90, has become perhaps the most reliable drug runner for the Sinaloa cartel, evading detection for nearly [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content