×

Kennedy Comes Back Home

In "Kennedy Come Back Home," helmer Zelimir Zilnik tackles a subject which one would think is beyond irony: the forceful expatriation of the Rom, or gypsies, from Western Europe. Though it would benefit from tighter editing, pic speaks with a strong voice that should be heard via socially interested broadcasters.

In “Kennedy Come Back Home,” unconventional Serbian helmer Zelimir Zilnik tackles a subject which one would think is beyond irony: the forceful expatriation of the Rom, or gypsies, from Western Europe. Snatched from their beds by police and thrown on a plane back to their native Serbia, many legally employed families face homelessness and poverty. This rambling documentary portrays the injustice of their plight by routing interviews with the victims through a resilient young taxi driver named Kenedi Hasani. Though it would benefit from tighter editing, pic speaks with a strong voice that should be heard via socially interested broadcasters.

The immigrants, who left former Yugoslavia in wartime, mostly spent the last decade in Germany as political refugees. In late 2002, the European Union sent them back to the new country of Serbia and Montenegro, on the grounds they were no longer persecuted. With their money confiscated in Germany and their homes in Kosovo long gone, their future is unimaginable. They begin their new life in tin barracks, eating from garbage cans. The effect on the children, who speak German and miss their schoolmates, is particularly heartbreaking.

Kennedy Comes Back Home

Serbia and Montenegro

  • Production: A Terra Film (Novi Sad) production. Directed, written by Zelimir Zilnik.
  • Crew: Camera (color, DV), Miodrag Milosevic; editor, Marko Cvejic. Reviewed at Palic Film Festival, Serbia, July 26, 2003. Running time: 73 MIN.