×
You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

B.B. and the Cormorant

"B.B. and the Cormorant" at least has the appeal of its youthful, pessimistic but authentic-feeling outlook.Tuscan comic and fledgling helmer Edoardo Gabbriellini contrasts the lack of satisfying jobs available to twentysomethings with "successful" adults engaged in TV marketeering and semi-legal business ventures.

With:
Mario - Edoardo Gabbriellini Gaia - Carolina Felline Gabriella - Selen Piero - Marco Giallini

A film without a great deal to say or much narrative gas, “B.B. and the Cormorant” at least has the appeal of its youthful, pessimistic but authentic-feeling outlook. Using a light touch, young Tuscan comic and fledgling helmer Edoardo Gabbriellini contrasts the lack of satisfying jobs available to Italian twentysomethings with “successful” adults engaged in TV marketeering and semi-legal business ventures. If only the scriptwriters had thought of a story to carry their vision beyond well-intentioned festival auds, this quirky piece might have more than a marginal chance at the box office.

Like characters in search of a story, Mario (Gabbriellini), his cool uncle (Marco Giallini), pretty dishwasher Gaia (Carolina Felline) and others gravitate around a rambling beach resort that’s never quite been finished. Squatters, shown as the helpless victims of city mismanagement, have settled in, to the displeasure of the barking businessman (Paolo Vivaldi) who claims to own the place. Hiring Mario as a plumber, and a shapely career woman (Selen) as his manager, he starts bringing in foreign tourists, whom the film lazily caricatures.

The off-season Tuscan coastline is gorgeous, but no one is happy in their dead-end jobs. Mario dreams of going to New York and being an underground musician (in grainy video cutaways to Manhattan streets). With the curly-haired looks of a young Bob Dylan, Gabbriellini is attractive but bloodless in the main role, making it hard to care about his ultimate fate. Liveliest thesp is Felline as the unpredictable Gaia and, with nothing else to catch viewers’ attention, their barely happening relationship ends up at the center of the film. Giallini is suave and in control as uncle Piero, whose fabled life in America turns out to be just a tall tale.

Dancing around blues and grays, Frederic Fasano’s camerawork has a nice, clean feel when it’s not engaged in complicated, unmotivated camera movements that look like the symptoms of first film disease. Musicians Simone Soldani and Valerio Fantozzi concoct a very listenable rock score which is discreetly used.

B.B. and the Cormorant

Italy

Production: A Medusa Film release (in Italy) of a Fandango production. (International sales: Intra Movies, Rome.) Produced by Domenico Procacci. Directed by Edoardo Gabbriellini. Screenplay, Federico Bacci, Gabbriellini, Lorenzo Tripodi.

Crew: Camera (color), Frederic Fasano; editor, Valentina Girodo; music, Simone Soldani, Valerio Fantozzi; production designer, Sonia Peng; costume designer, Bettina Pontiggia; sound (Dolby digital), Maricetta Lombardo. Reviewed at Cannes Film Festival (Critics' Week), May 23, 2003. Running time: 89 MIN.

With: Mario - Edoardo Gabbriellini Gaia - Carolina Felline Gabriella - Selen Piero - Marco GialliniWith: Giorgio Algrante, Paolo Vivaldi.

More Film

  • Robert Smith, Longtime Executive at DuArt

    Robert Smith, Longtime Executive at New York's DuArt Film Labs, Dies at 88

    Robert Smith, a longtime executive with New York’s DuArt Film Labs, died Jan. 11 in Montvale, N.J. He was 88. Smith spent some 62 years with DuArt, the film processing and post-production facility founded in 1922 in the penthouse of an automobile garage in Midtown. Smith rose to president of DuArt before retiring in 2015. [...]

  • Bird Box

    Los Angeles On-Location Feature Filming Surges 12.2% in 2018

    On-location feature filming in Greater Los Angeles expanded impressively in 2018, gaining 12.2% to 4,377 shooting days, according to FilmL.A. Production activity for feature films rose 15.5% to 1,078 shooting days during the fourth quarter, with 146 days coming from projects receiving California tax credits — including Netflix’s “Bird Box,” Quentin Tarantino’s “Once Upon a [...]

  • 'Ghostbusters': First Look at Jason Reitman's

    Watch the First Teaser for Jason Reitman's 'Ghostbusters' Sequel

    If there’s something strange in your neighborhood, it’s time to watch a teaser for Jason Reitman’s “Ghostbusters” forthcoming film. Sony Pictures released a first look at the upcoming movie, a sequel to the 1984 classic. The footage shows a glimpse of the memorable station wagon Ecto-1. The studio announced on Tuesday that the wheels are [...]

  • Anne Hathaway

    Anne Hathaway to Star in Robert Zemeckis' 'The Witches' (EXCLUSIVE)

    Anne Hathaway has closed a deal to star as the Grand High Witch in Robert Zemeckis and Warner Bros.’ “The Witches” adaptation. Variety first reported that Hathaway was holding the offer for both that and “Sesame Street,” and at the time, scheduling for both films were holding up dealmaking. With those issues settled, Hathaway is [...]

  • Film Ratings Overhauled in the U.K.,

    Film Ratings Overhauled in the U.K. With Tougher Restrictions on Sexual Content

    The body that oversees film ratings in the U.K. is tightening its age restrictions and giving movies with certain types of sexual content older age ratings. The British Board of Film Classification said the changes were in response to public demand after a consultation that took in the views of over 10,000 people in the [...]

  • The Hunchback of Notre Dame

    'Hunchback of Notre Dame' Live-Action Reboot in the Works at Disney

    Disney is in early development on a live-action “The Hunchback of Notre Dame” movie, based on Disney’s animated film and Victor Hugo’s 1831 novel “Notre-Dame de Paris.” Playwright David Henry Hwang is attached to write the script, with Mandeville Films and Josh Gad set to produce. Alan Menken and Stephen Schwartz will pen the music. [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content