The Trespasser

A potentially gripping sociopolitical thriller is undercut and eventually overwhelmed by empty stylistic flourishes in "The Trespasser," Brazilian helmer Beto Brant's disappointing follow-up to his well-received "Belly Up" (1997) and "Friendly Fire" (1998). Elliptical storytelling style dissipates all suspense.

With:
With: Marco Ricca, Alexandre Borges, Paulo Miklos, Malu Mader, Mariana Ximenes.

A potentially gripping sociopolitical thriller is undercut and eventually overwhelmed by empty stylistic flourishes in “The Trespasser,” Brazilian helmer Beto Brant’s disappointing follow-up to his well-received “Belly Up” (1997) and “Friendly Fire” (1998). Elliptical storytelling style dissipates all suspense, and abrupt ironic-twist ending is neither dramatically persuasive nor emotionally satisfying. Pic copped Latin America Cinema jury prize at Sundance 2002, but it’s doubtful that “Trespasser” will move far beyond global fest circuit.

Based on a novel by Marcal Aquino, who co-wrote screenplay adaptation with Brant and Renato Ciasca, drama revolves around aftermath of a contract killing. Two Sao Paolo entrepreneurs (Marco Ricca, Alexandre Borges) opt to cover up their less-than-legal dealings by hiring a sleazy hit man (Paulo Miklos) to murder their squeaky-clean partner in a thriving construction business. Unfortunately, the hit man hangs around long after the hit. When he’s not busy intimidating the entrepreneurs and bullying his way into their business, he’s romancing his victim’s wild and beautiful daughter. Miklos — resembling a younger, sweatier and just plain creepier Harry Dean Stanton — grabs top acting honors by striking an effective balance between comic bluster and icy menace.

The Trespasser

Brazil

Production: A Drama Filmes production. Produced by Renato Ciasca, Bianca Villar. Directed by Beto Brant. Screenplay, Brant, Marcal Aquino,Renato Ciasca, based on the novel by Aquino.

Crew: Camera (color), Toca Seabra; editors, Manga Campion, Willen Dias; art director, Yukio Sato; costume designer, Juliana Prysthon. Reviewed at Sundance Film Festival (World Cinema), Jan. 17, 2002. Running time: 97 MIN.

With: With: Marco Ricca, Alexandre Borges, Paulo Miklos, Malu Mader, Mariana Ximenes.

More Film

  • 'BuyBust' Review

    Film Review: ‘BuyBust’

    A potentially gripping sociopolitical thriller is undercut and eventually overwhelmed by empty stylistic flourishes in “The Trespasser,” Brazilian helmer Beto Brant’s disappointing follow-up to his well-received “Belly Up” (1997) and “Friendly Fire” (1998). Elliptical storytelling style dissipates all suspense, and abrupt ironic-twist ending is neither dramatically persuasive nor emotionally satisfying. Pic copped Latin America Cinema […]

  • John Malone

    John Malone, Scott Paterson Retiring From Lionsgate Board

    A potentially gripping sociopolitical thriller is undercut and eventually overwhelmed by empty stylistic flourishes in “The Trespasser,” Brazilian helmer Beto Brant’s disappointing follow-up to his well-received “Belly Up” (1997) and “Friendly Fire” (1998). Elliptical storytelling style dissipates all suspense, and abrupt ironic-twist ending is neither dramatically persuasive nor emotionally satisfying. Pic copped Latin America Cinema […]

  • Moviepass

    MoviePass Parent's Stock Plunges Again to Record Low

    A potentially gripping sociopolitical thriller is undercut and eventually overwhelmed by empty stylistic flourishes in “The Trespasser,” Brazilian helmer Beto Brant’s disappointing follow-up to his well-received “Belly Up” (1997) and “Friendly Fire” (1998). Elliptical storytelling style dissipates all suspense, and abrupt ironic-twist ending is neither dramatically persuasive nor emotionally satisfying. Pic copped Latin America Cinema […]

  • Timothee Chalamet

    Timothee Chalamet in Talks to Star in Denis Villeneuve's 'Dune'

    A potentially gripping sociopolitical thriller is undercut and eventually overwhelmed by empty stylistic flourishes in “The Trespasser,” Brazilian helmer Beto Brant’s disappointing follow-up to his well-received “Belly Up” (1997) and “Friendly Fire” (1998). Elliptical storytelling style dissipates all suspense, and abrupt ironic-twist ending is neither dramatically persuasive nor emotionally satisfying. Pic copped Latin America Cinema […]

  • Taraji P Henson Sam Rockwell

    Taraji P. Henson-Sam Rockwell Drama 'Best of Enemies' Bought by STX

    A potentially gripping sociopolitical thriller is undercut and eventually overwhelmed by empty stylistic flourishes in “The Trespasser,” Brazilian helmer Beto Brant’s disappointing follow-up to his well-received “Belly Up” (1997) and “Friendly Fire” (1998). Elliptical storytelling style dissipates all suspense, and abrupt ironic-twist ending is neither dramatically persuasive nor emotionally satisfying. Pic copped Latin America Cinema […]

  • Harrison Ford plane incident

    Harrison Ford Eyes 'Call of the Wild' (EXCLUSIVE)

    A potentially gripping sociopolitical thriller is undercut and eventually overwhelmed by empty stylistic flourishes in “The Trespasser,” Brazilian helmer Beto Brant’s disappointing follow-up to his well-received “Belly Up” (1997) and “Friendly Fire” (1998). Elliptical storytelling style dissipates all suspense, and abrupt ironic-twist ending is neither dramatically persuasive nor emotionally satisfying. Pic copped Latin America Cinema […]

  • Matthew Rhys

    Matthew Rhys to Co-Star With Tom Hanks in Mr. Rogers Film 'You Are My Friend' (EXCLUSIVE)

    A potentially gripping sociopolitical thriller is undercut and eventually overwhelmed by empty stylistic flourishes in “The Trespasser,” Brazilian helmer Beto Brant’s disappointing follow-up to his well-received “Belly Up” (1997) and “Friendly Fire” (1998). Elliptical storytelling style dissipates all suspense, and abrupt ironic-twist ending is neither dramatically persuasive nor emotionally satisfying. Pic copped Latin America Cinema […]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content