×

Barry and the Remains

Although he wouldn't have admitted it a couple of years ago, Barry Tashian is now a devout believer in the adage that absence makes the heart grow fonder. More than three decades ago, Tashian broke up the Remains to concentrate on a more "serious" career in country music, playing alongside folks such as Gram Parsons and Emmylou Harris.

With:
Musicians: Barry Tashian, Vern Miller, Bill Briggs III, Chip Damiani, the Woggles, the Swingin' Neckbreakers, Lady Kensington and the Beatlords and the Brimstones.

Although he wouldn’t have admitted it a couple of years ago, Barry Tashian is now a devout believer in the adage that absence makes the heart grow fonder. More than three decades ago, Tashian broke up the Remains — one of the most fondly remembered garage bands of the original Nuggets generation — to concentrate on a more “serious” career in country music, playing alongside folks such as Gram Parsons and Emmylou Harris.

His change of heart was spurred by the discovery of an old diary chronicling the Remains’ opening slot on the Beatles final American tour — which Tashian turned into a charming book entitled “Ticket to Ride.” In the four years since its publication, Tashian and the three other original members of the band have toured intermittently and — as evidenced by a sweat-soaked Gotham set on Saturday — formulated an aural analog to the picture of Dorian Gray.

There was nothing fancy about the foursome’s hour-plus perf, which was evenly split between stomping originals like “Ain’t That Her” and “Me Right Now” (both of which got plenty of snap and crackle from Chip Damiani’s hard-driving drumming) and stripped-down covers such as “Diddy Wah Diddy” and “Hang on Sloopy.”

Tashian’s guitar playing is somewhat more sophisticated now than in the days when the Remains spearheaded the so-called Bosstown Sound. But as he proved on “Once Before” and a tumultuous cover of “I’m a Man,” he’s not about to let technique get in the way of a sharp sonic left hook.

None of the bands that took the stage at this edition of Cavestomp fell into the costume-rock trap that some garage hounds can’t seem to avoid. Likewise, most of the openers steered clear of one-trick pony revivalism, cagily cobbling together subtle variations on a theme, ranging from the fuzzed-out snottiness of Lady Kensington and the Beatlords to the spare, sinister surf-punk of Trenton-based Swingin’ Neckbreakers.

Evening’s most explosive perf was turned in by the Woggles, an Atlanta foursome that takes the soul-inflected rhythm ‘n’ rollick of the Fleshtones and laces it with enough caffeine to power a convoy of truckers across Route 66.

Singer Manfred Jones spent much of the set shimmying on the dance floor (or atop one of the club’s tables), barking out dance instructions (“Push,” “Doin’ the Montague”) or waxing multiculturally lustful (as on the chicken-fried Japanese ditty “Mela Mela”). Incorporating New Orleans-styled R&B and “Animal House”-worthy frat-rock, the Woggles bring the old-school rock revue into the modern age with grit and garrulousness to spare.

Barry and the Remains

Village Underground; 350 capacity; $17.50

Production: Presented by Renegade Nation Prods. and Cavestomp. Reviewed Aug. 18, 2001.

Cast: Musicians: Barry Tashian, Vern Miller, Bill Briggs III, Chip Damiani, the Woggles, the Swingin' Neckbreakers, Lady Kensington and the Beatlords and the Brimstones.

More Music

  • Black Ball

    President Trump Speaks in Support of A$AP Rocky (Watch)

    In one of the more surreal moments from a presidency filled with few not-surreal moments, President Trump spoke out today in support of rapper A$AP Rocky, who has been jailed in Sweden for more than two weeks after an altercation with fans he said were harassing him. “A$AP Rocky is a situation in Sweden, a [...]

  • David Crosby and Cameron Crowe'David Crosby:

    Cameron Crowe Picks Five Favorite Underrated David Crosby Tracks

    “Music is love,” as David Crosby once sang, and nothing breeds deeper love than a sense that something is overlooked. So that’s why Variety asked Cameron Crowe to dig deep into the Crosby canon and pick not just a triad but five favorites from among the CSN singer’s most underrated tracks. Crowe, of course, has [...]

  • Live Nation Logo. (PRNewsFoto/Live Nation)

    Live Nation Confirms Placing Tickets Directly on Secondary Market at Artists’ Request

    Representatives for Live Nation, the world’s largest live-entertainment company and owner of Ticketmaster, confirmed that it bypassed conventional channels and directly placed thousands of concert tickets on the secondary market upon artists’ request, in an article published in Billboard. In a statement shared with Variety, the company acknowledged that it has facilitated the transfer of [...]

  • The Lion King The Gift

    Album Review: Beyoncé’s 'The Lion King: The Gift'

    Before touching down on what Beyoncé has called her “love letter to Africa,” it’s important to see what may have brought her to the mother of mankind, with its wide vistas and sonic planes, for “The Gift” in the first place — beyond, of course, voicing Nala in the film and whatever international marketing tie-ins [...]

  • Rick Rubin Spotify Secret Genius Awards,

    Seven Things We Learned About 'Shangri-La' and Rick Rubin from Showtime's Series

    Showtime’s documentary series “Shangri-La” insists it is not a biographical documentary on uber-producer Rick Rubin, and it’s not meant as a four-hour advertisement for Rubin’s legendary Malibu studio, after which the four-part series is named … but it feels like a little bit of both those things. “Shangri-La” is primarily filmed at the studio where [...]

  • Katy Perry American Idol judge

    Katy Perry Testifies in ‘Dark Horse’ Copyright Trial

    Katy Perry took the stand Thursday and testified that she had never heard the song “Joyful Noise” before she was accused of infringing on its copyright, according to ABC 7 in Los Angeles. Christian hip-hop artist Marcus Gray and the song’s co-writers claim that Perry’s 2013 track “Dark Horse” uses an uses an instrumental phrase [...]

  • Highwomen Drop First Video, With a

    Highwomen Supergroup Drops First Video, With a Slew of Female Country Star Cameos

    The country supergroup the Highwomen have dropped their first video, for the just-released debut single, “Redesigning Women,” and it’s even more of a cluster of exclusively female country stars than the core quartet itself. Joining members Brandi Carlile, Maren Morris, Natalie Hemby and Amanda Shires are such familiar figures as Wynonna Judd, Lauren Alaina, Cam, [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content