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The Bread, My Sweet

All grown up after all these years since "Happy Days" and "Joanie Loves Chachi," Scott Baio makes a personable impression in writer-director Melissa Martin's sentimental drama. Lightweight but likable pic is safe bet for cable and TV venues.

All grown up after all these years since “Happy Days” and “Joanie Loves Chachi,” Scott Baio makes a personable impression in writer-director Melissa Martin’s sentimental drama. Lightweight but likable pic is safe bet for cable and TV venues.

Plot revolves around Dominic (Baio), a Pittsburgh-based mergers-and-acquisitions exec who finds time to operate a neighborhood bakery with his brothers — Eddie (Billy Mott), a smart-alecky womanizer, and Pinio (Shuler Hensley), a mentally-challenged gentle giant. Dominic’s favorite customers are Massimo (John Seitz) and Bella (Rosemary Prinz), elderly Italian immigrants who rent the apartment above his bakery. When sweetly maternal Bella confides that she’s dying of cancer, Dominic impulsively decides to make her final days much happier by marrying her footloose daughter, Lucca (Kristen Minter). (His decision might seem a trifle more selfless if the prodigal daughter weren’t so easy on the eyes.) Initially dubious, Lucca reluctantly agrees to the setup to fulfill Bella’s dream of a lavish wedding for her only child. Nothing that happens next is particularly surprising, but much of it is surprisingly affecting.

The Bread, My Sweet

  • Production: A Who Knew Prods. presentation of a Buon Sibo production. Produced by Adrienne Wehr, Melissa Martin. Executive producer, William C. Hulley. Directed, written by Melissa Martin.
  • Crew: Camera (color), Mark Knobil; editor, Chuck Aikman; music, Susan Hartford. Reviewed on videocassette, Houston, April 6, 2001. (In WorldFest/Houston Film Festival.) Running time: 105 MIN.
  • With: <B>With:</B> Scott Baio, John Seitz, Billy Mott, Shuler Hensley, Rosemary Prinz, Kristen Minter.
  • Music By: