×

Jericho

Merlin Miller's unabashedly retrograde Western may please homevid viewers with a hankering for an old-fashioned, no-frills sagebrush saga, but handsomely photographed pic is mostly bland and isn't likely to gallop into many megaplex corrals.

With:
With: Mark Valley, Leon Coffee, R. Lee Ermey, Lisa Stewart, Mark Collie, Morgana Shaw, Buck Taylor, Kateri Walker.

Merlin Miller’s unabashedly retrograde Western may please homevid viewers with a hankering for an old-fashioned, no-frills sagebrush saga, but handsomely photographed pic is mostly bland and isn’t likely to gallop into many megaplex corrals.

Mark Valley is slightly stiff but modestly engaging as an amnesiac who’s dumped from a train and left for dead in the wake of a payroll robbery. He’s nursed back to health by Joshua (Leon Coffee), a deeply religious ex-slave who believes in turning the other cheek, then throwing a right hook. Joshua dubs the stranger Jericho and tries to help him unlock the secret of his past. As they ride together, however, they uncover clues that indicate Jericho is a fugitive wanted for killing a sheriff. Coming off as a throwback to Saturday matinee fare — there’s even a bunch of very non-P.C. Mexican banditos — this filmed-in-Texas indie occasionally recalls the lesser star vehicles of Audie Murphy or Randolph Scott. But those guys usually worked with directors who knew a thing about pacing and montage.

Jericho

Production: A Black Knight Prods. production. Produced by Merlin Miller, Gil Dorland. Executive producer, John Draper. Directed by Merlin Miller. Screenplay, Robert Avard Miller, Frank Dana Frankolino, George Leonard Briggs.

Crew: Camera (color) Jerry Holway; editor, Agustin Rexach Martin; music, Mark Haffner; production designer, Charles C. Ingram. Reviewed at Landmark Greenway 3 Theater, Houston, April 12, 2001. (In WorldFest/Houston Film Festival.) Running time: 101 MIN.

With: With: Mark Valley, Leon Coffee, R. Lee Ermey, Lisa Stewart, Mark Collie, Morgana Shaw, Buck Taylor, Kateri Walker.

More Film

  • Bo Burnham34th Film Independent Spirit Awards,

    Bo Burnham Wants 'Eighth Grade' Star Elsie Fisher to Direct Him

    Bo Burnham won his third award in three weeks for “Eighth Grade” at the Spirit Awards and said he wants the film’s 15-year-old Elsie Fisher to direct him. “I’d love to work with Elsie again,” Burnham said backstage after winning the Best First Screenplay trophy.  “She wants to direct so I’d love to switch roles [...]

  • Nicole Holofcener: 'Can You Ever Forgive

    Nicole Holofcener: 'Can You Ever Forgive Me?' Director Was Cheated Out of an Oscar Nomination

    “Can You Ever Forgive Me?” screenwriter Nicole Holofcener offered a blunt assessment of the lack of Academy Awards recognition for director Marielle Heller, and women directors everywhere. “I feel Marielle was cheated and I feel badly about that,” Holofcener said backstage after winning a Spirit Award for screenplay with Jeff Whitty. Holofcener was originally attached [...]

  • Stephan James as Fonny and Brian

    2019 Indie Spirit Awards Winners: Complete List

    The 2019 Independent Spirit Awards took place on a beach in Santa Monica, Calif., with Barry Jenkins’ “If Beale Street Could Talk” taking the top prize for best feature along with best director for Jenkins. Ethan Hawke and Glenn Close took the prizes for best male lead and best female lead, respectively. Bo Burnham took [...]

  • Oscars Oscar Academy Awards Placeholder

    Hated It! How We Learned to Stop Worrying and Gripe About the Oscars

    Watching the Academy Awards telecast, then grousing about it the next day, has become a hipster parlor game — it’s what the Complete Oscar Experience now is. The complaints are legion, and we all know what they are, because we’ve all made them. The show was too long. The host bombed. His or her opening [...]

  • Boots Riley arrives at the 34th

    Boots Riley: Spike Lee Yelled at Me After 'BlacKkKlansman' Criticism, But We're Good Now

    “Sorry to Bother You” director and musician Boots Riley, who wrote a scathing criticism of Spike Lee’s “BlacKkKlansman” for its positive representation of law enforcement, said that he and the “Do the Right Thing” auteur are good now. But it took some time (and drama) to get there. Last year, Riley called Lee’s Oscar-nominated “BlacKkKlansman” [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content