Sy Weintraub

Sy Weintraub, who helped keep the Tarzan franchise alive from the late 1950s to the late 1960s with a series of movies about the jungle apeman, died Tuesday of pancreatic cancer at his Beverly Hills home. He was 76.

Weintraub also held executive posts with Panavision, the National General Television Corp. and Columbia Pictures Industries.

Films he produced including “Tarzan’s Greatest Adventure,” “Tarzan Goes to India,” “Tarzan’s Three Challenges” and “Tarzan and the Valley of Gold.”

The casts of Weintraub’s Tarzan movies included Anthony Quayle, Woody Strode and a young Sean Connery.

Born in New York City, Weintraub served in the Army during World War II, then earned a journalism degree from the U. of Missouri and later helped form Flamingo Films, a television syndication company.

In addition to Tarzan movies, Weintraub produced two Sherlock Holmes adaptations, “The Hound of the Baskervilles” and “The Sign of Four,” starring Ian Richardson as the legendary detective.

He was married twice, to model Marjorie Horne and writer Linda Palmer. Both marriages ended in divorce.

Weintraub is survived by two daughters and four grandsons.

No funeral service was planned.

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