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Globes ‘In Love’ and war

'Ryan,' 'Shakespeare' best pix; 'Practice,' 'Ally' top TV

“Shakespeare in Love” was named best musical or comedy film and “Saving Private Ryan” best drama Sunday at the 56th Golden Globes.

In television honors, ABC’s “The Practice” was chosen as best dramatic series, and “Ally McBeal” garnered its second consecutive Globe for best musical or comedy TV series.

David E. Kelley won as creator and producer of both shows, which together garnered four awards.

Steven Spielberg accepted “Saving Private Ryan’s” two awards, as a producer of the best dramatic film and as best director. “I never believe I’m going to win anything,” said Spielberg when he accepted the directing nod. “This is an amazing event in my life.”

He seemed more restrained when accepting for best dramatic picture, perhaps because his friend and star, Tom Hanks, had been passed over for best dramatic film actor in favor of Jim Carrey.

Claiming “Truman Show’s” third award, which tied it with “Shakespeare” as most honored film of the evening, Carrey, who was clearly excited to win, began his acceptance of the best actor in a film drama by saying, “This is serious. It’s going to be so hard to talk out of my ass after this — but I’ll manage.” Carrey added. “You know what this means — I’m a shoe-in for the Blockbuster Awards.”

Miramax topper Harvey Weinstein accepted the award for best musical or comedy film for “Shakespeare in Love.”

“Long hours, low pay,” said Weinstein, wearing his producer hat. “Now I know what it’s like to work for the Weinstein brothers.”

Accepting the award for best actor in a musical or comedy film for Miramax’s “Little Voice,” Michael Caine said, “My career must be slipping. This is the first time I’ve ever been available to pick up an award.”

Caine also thanked Harvey Weinstein for the “last movie I did and the next one I hope to do. Without him I don’t work a lot.”

Comic relief

Caine’s relatively long speech had the evening’s best comic timing. He mentioned the films he’d done and said “I took every piece of crap that came in.” Pause for laughter. “And I made a lot of money.” Longer pause. “And now I can afford to do art.”

Cate Blanchett was named best actress in a drama film for her regal turn in “Elizabeth.” She thanked a long list of friends and colleagues and ended by saying “if I’ve forgotten anyone it’s because I’m a little bit delirious.”

Gwyneth Paltrow was named best actress in a musical or comedy for Miramax/Universal’s “Shakespeare in Love.” In a black, strapless gown, Paltrow thanked family, friends, crew and “the Bomber Weinstein, my godfather.” Who knew Harvey had a nickname?

Ed Harris was chosen best supporting actor for his role of cool manipulator of mythical Truman Burbank and Sea Haven in Paramount’s “The Truman Show.” In the evening’s first acceptance speech a few minutes after 5 p.m., he said, “Oh, man, I just got through eating dinner.” Harris went on to thank family, agents, co-workers and God. “You got to get these names in, these people do work hard.”

Best supporting actress

Lynn Redgrave won best supporting actress for her work in “Gods and Monsters.” She recalled her role in “Georgy Girl,” for which she won the best actress nod. “It’s been 32 years since I stood one of these on the mantlepiece and it’s been crying out for a friend ever since.”

Marc Norman and Tom Stoppard won best screenplay for Miramax/Universal’s “Shakespeare in Love.” Norman first thanked Shakespeare and didn’t get much of a laugh, but got more when he went on to thank Xanax. He ended by saying “it might take a village to raise a child but it takes a family to write a screenplay.”

Interestingly, the best film winners were both studio-co-productions. “Saving Private Ryan” was from DreamWorks and Paramount, and Miramax partnered with Universal on “Shakespeare in Love.” In terms of studio tallies for films, Paramount took five Globes, sharing a pair with DreamWorks, and Miramax won four, sharing three with U.

Best original film score went to Burkhard Dallwitz and Philip Glass for their work on “The Truman Show.” Original song went to “The Prayer” from “Quest for Camelot,” Accepting were David Foster and Carole Bayer Sager, who called singers Celine Dion and Andrea Bocelli “voices from God.”

‘Central’s’ station

The award for foreign-language film went to Sony Pictures Classics’ “Central Station.” Actress Fernanda Montenegro accepted, saying “My English is not good, but my soul is better. You choose.”

Warren Beatty presented the Cecil B. DeMille award to Jack Nicholson, whom he called “one of my childhood idols.” He went on to say “it’s hard to imagine modern American movies without Jack.” Though clips were shown from many of his friend’s film’s, Beatty said, “we don’t have time to show the ones he did with his contemporary, Cecil B. DeMille.”

To the strains of “Born to Be Wild,” Nicholson accepted, and said “Warren, I thought you had a lot more love for me than that.”

He quoted Jim Lampley who once said to him, “Jack, the fact that you’ve had a life is an achievement.”

In a wide-ranging speech, Nicholson said he appreciated the award because “it doesn’t’ come from a peer group.” He called the Hollywood Foreign press “a loose group of guys and gals. You almost feel you could go out and have fun with them.”

He recalled coming to previous, possibly more alcohol-fueled Globes ceremonies, “before they were televised,” and seeing Joan Crawford grab her breasts and say, “In my day, we had ’em” and Rita Hayworth pulling up her dress. “I like fun,” said the honoree. “What can I say?”

He ended by saying “Life achievement. These awards put the fear of the shroud into me.”

Winning trio

On the television side, the big winners were HBO (for four longform projects) and ABC and 20th Century Fox TV, each represented by three different winning programs. Fox-based Dual series winner David E. Kelley Prods. also is based at Fox.

In addition to best TV drama, ABC and Kelley’s “The Practice” stars Dylan McDermott and Camryn Manheim won for best actor in a drama and supporting actress in a series, miniseries or telefilm, respectively. Manheim shared the award with Faye Dunaway, who scored for her work in HBO’s “Gia.” Michael J. Fox (best actor for the second straight year in a musical or comedy for “Spin City”) and Jenna Elfman (actress in a musical or comedy for “Dharma and Greg”) also scored victories for the Alphabet network.

The WB scored its first Golden Globe as Keri Russell was a surprise winner as best actress in a drama for her work in the rookie series “Felicity,” from Imagine TV and Touchstone TV.

Twentieth Century Fox TV’s “Ally McBeal” (which also airs on the Fox network) joined fellow studio productions “The Practice” and “Dharma and Greg” in the winner’s circle. 20th Century Fox TV was far and away the most-nominated TV supplier this year, with 14. Its shows took a total of five awards.

In addition to Dunaway’s co-victory for “Gia,” HBO winners were: “From the Earth to the Moon” for best miniseries or telefilm; Angelina Jolie for best actress in a miniseries or telefilm for “Gia”; Stanley Tucci for best actor in a miniseries or telefilm for “Winchell”; and Don Cheadle for “The Rat Pack” (tied with “Moby Dick’s” Gregory Peck.)

NBC and CBS were shut out of the winner’s circle, even though the Peacock web was the most nominated network (20) and had both the most-nominated drama series (“ER” with four) and comedy series (“Just Shoot Me” with five).

Winning redux

Kelley thanked the press association for giving “McBeal” “a jump start” after winning the same award last year.

He also said “The Practice” — which was honored at the same time an episode of the legal series was airing on ABC — was about the basement of the criminal justice system and sardonically thanked “the people in Washington for moving into that basement.”

“Felicity’s” Russell said “encouraging comes more to mind more than thanks,” while “The Practice’s” McDermott said “the only thing I’ve won before this was Top 100 Irish Americans.”

“Spin City’s” Fox began reading notes from a tiny piece of paper and said, “I’d like to thank my fellow nominees,” then paused to say, “It kind of takes the sincerity right out of it when you do that, doesn’t it?”

Jolie, in a low-cut, sparkling silver dress that revealed a tattoo on her left arm, won best actress in a miniseries or made-for-TV movie for her performance as the doomed model in HBO’s “Gia.” She tearfully ended her acceptance speech by saying: “Mom, I know you wanted to be an actress, and you gave it up to raise me.”

Stanley Tucci won best actor in a miniseries or made-for-TV movie for his performance as the 20th century’s most powerful gossip columnist in HBO’s “Winchell.” He accepted from Ving Rhames, who seemed to be serious when he said “we went to college together and he gave me the name Ving. My real name is Irving.” First Harvey, now Ving. Who knew?

Tom Hanks, exec producer of HBO’s “From the Earth to the Moon,” thanked the “men and women of Apollo era at NASA” and “the hardest working team in show business,” which included Brian Grazer, who stood nearby.

Manheim of “The Practice” thanked the HFPA for “being invited to the best party of the year.” She got some of the wildest applause of the evening when she ended by saying, “and I’d like to share this with every single senator who votes to dismiss the case tomorrow.”

Cheadle won for his portrayal of Sammy Davis Jr. in HBO’s “The Rat Pack.” He shared with Peck of USA Network’s “Moby Dick,” who received an immediate and prolonged standing ovation. “I think I won one of these in 1947,” said Peck when he reached the stage, “and it was very encouraging then and it’s very encouraging now.”

Beverly event

The awards were presented Sunday evening in the Beverly Hilton’s International Ballroom. The voting was done by the 82 active members of the Hollywood Foreign Press Assn.

The three-hour show, produced by the HFPA in association with Dick Clark Prods., was telecast live on the East Coast by NBC and tape-delayed in the West.

Though the Globes are seen by some as a foreteller of Oscar fortunes, for the most part this has been true in years when there’s been a clear frontrunner. Last year the HFPA did well with “Titanic” and the previous year with “The English Patient.”

However, in 1997, when the race was more wide open and “Braveheart” was Oscar’s top pic, the Globes went to “Sense and Sensibility” and “Babe.”

And, of course, the HFPA doubles its chances of foretelling an Oscar winner by having dual categories for drama and musical-comedy. Even with this advantage, the HFPA isn’t anywhere near as clairvoyant as, say, the Directors Guild, which has missed presaging the helmer Oscar only four times since 1949.

A complete list of winners follows:

MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA
“Saving Private Ryan,” DreamWorks & Paramount Pictures; DreamWorks & Paramount Pictures

MOTION PICTURE – MUSICAL OR COMEDY
“Shakespeare in Love,” Miramax Films/Universal Pictures/The Bedford Falls Company; Miramax Films/Universal Pictures

PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA
Cate Blanchett, “Elizabeth”

PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA
Jim Carrey, “The Truman Show”

PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – MUSICAL OR COMEDY
Gwyneth Paltrow, “Shakespeare in Love”

PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – MUSICAL OR COMEDY
Michael Caine, “Little Voice”

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
“Central Station,” Sony Pictures Classics – Brazil

PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MOTION PICTURE
Lynn Redgrave, “Gods and Monsters”

PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MOTION PICTURE
Ed Harris, “The Truman Show”

DIRECTOR – MOTION PICTURE
Steven Spielberg, “Saving Private Ryan”

SCREENPLAY – MOTION PICTURE
Marc Norman/Tom Stoppard, “Shakespeare in Love”

ORIGINAL SCORE – MOTION PICTURE
Burkhard Dallwitz/Additional music by Philip Glass, “The Truman Show”

ORIGINAL SONG – MOTION PICTURE
“The Prayer – Quest For Camelot: The Magic Sword”; Music and Lyrics: David Foster & Carole Bayer Sager (Italian Translation: Alberto Testa and Tony Renis)

TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA
“The Practice,” 20th Century Fox TV/David E. Kelley Prods.; ABC

TELEVISION SERIES – MUSICAL OR COMEDY
“Ally McBeal,” David E. Kelley/20th Century Fox TV; FOX

PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA
Keri Russell, “Felicity”

PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA
Dylan McDermott, “The Practice”

PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION SERIES – MUSICAL OR COMEDY
Jenna Elfman, “Dharma and Greg”

PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A TELEVISION SERIES – MUSICAL OR COMEDY
“Michael J. Fox,” Spin City

MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION
“From the Earth to the Moon,” HBO/Imagine Ent./Clavius Base; HBO

PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MINI-SERIES OR A MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION
Angelina Jolie, “Gia”

PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MINI-SERIES OR A MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION
Stanley Tucci, “Winchell”

PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A SERIES, MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION
Faye Dunaway, “Gia”
Camryn Manheim, “The Practice”

PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A SERIES, MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION
Don Cheadle, “The Rat Pack”
Gregory Peck, “Moby Dick”

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