×
You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

Two for Texas

Scripter Larry Brothers has penned a story based on James Lee Burke's novel about a middle-aged hero named Allison and his young, innocent pal Holland who, meeting in a dreadful 1830s penal colony in Louisiana, bust out so they can have all sorts of adventures. With Kris Kristofferson and Scott Bairstow as the buddies, and with uneven helming by director Rod Hardy, "Two for Texas" doesn't offer much in the way of credibility.

With:
Kris Kristofferson, Scott Bairstow, Tom Skerritt, Peter Coyote, Irene Bedard, Victor Rivers, Rodney Grant, Marco Rodriguez, Richard Jones, Woody Watson, Thomas Schuster, Julio Cesar Cedillo, Karey Green, Terry McIlvain, Alex Morris, Richard Nance, Robert Lott, Roger Boyce, Daniel O'Callaghan, Carlos Compean, Larry Brothers, Rick Dennis, Mark Dalton.

Scripter Larry Brothers has penned a story based on James Lee Burke’s novel about a middle-aged hero named Allison and his young, innocent pal Holland who, meeting in a dreadful 1830s penal colony in Louisiana, bust out so they can have all sorts of adventures. With Kris Kristofferson and Scott Bairstow as the buddies, and with uneven helming by director Rod Hardy, “Two for Texas” doesn’t offer much in the way of credibility.

Busting out of their imprisonment and taking the fair Choctaw femme Sana (a convincing Irene Bedard) along, they make a zigzag trail toward Sam Houston’s east Texas camp-out. Holland (Bairstow) succumbs one murky campsite night to Sana’s come-ons; the next morning Allison tells him Sana’s gotta hit the road.

The two hombres, riding through less-than-exciting happenings, meet up with Houston (a miscast Tom Skerritt, who insists on acting sternly historic). Houston wants to know about their past, so they spill why they were in the pokey. And speaking up for Allison is longtime friend Jim Bowie (played with considerable skill by Peter Coyote).

Bowie and his knife are around, but not for long: He’s heading off for the Alamo. Houston explains to his men why their small band of soldiers can’t go help fight Santa Anna (Marco Rodriguez) and his 5,000 men.

Allison and Holland survey the aftermath of the Alamo (production designer Cary White and crew did construct an impressive Alamo facade) and, among the ruins, encounter widow Dickinson (Karey Green, who, thanks to director Hardy’s misguidance, overplays the meaty role she’s handed).

Now it’s on with Houston to the Battle of San Jacinto, which is full of explosives, hurtling costumed bodies, staring corpses, wild-eyed horses and little persuasion.

While director Hardy earns credit for the early swamp prison scenes, the script doesn’t help the cause as the heroes hit dry land. Kristofferson eases his way through the role, and Bairstow’s stuck with a callow, not particularly interesting character in Holland. As a team, their best moments occur when, at the end, they sentimentally break up.

Tech credits are OK, but the buddy characters’ friendship isn’t that persuasive, and the secondary characters aren’t particularly impressive — save Rodriguez’s Santa Anna, Coyote’s Bowie and Bedard’s touching Indian maiden.

Two for Texas

Sun. (18) 8-10 p.m., TNT

Production: Filmed outside Austin, at two San Antonio missions and at Caddo Lake, Texas, by Bleecker Street Films. Executive producer, Lois Bonfiglio; producer, Dennis Bishop; director, Rod Hardy; writer, Larry Brothers; based on the novel by James Lee Burke;

Crew: Camera, David Connell; editor, Michael Ornstein; production designer, Cary White; art director, Ed Vega; sound, John Pritchett; music, Lee Holdridge; casting, Julie Selzer, Jo Edna Boldin.

With: Kris Kristofferson, Scott Bairstow, Tom Skerritt, Peter Coyote, Irene Bedard, Victor Rivers, Rodney Grant, Marco Rodriguez, Richard Jones, Woody Watson, Thomas Schuster, Julio Cesar Cedillo, Karey Green, Terry McIlvain, Alex Morris, Richard Nance, Robert Lott, Roger Boyce, Daniel O'Callaghan, Carlos Compean, Larry Brothers, Rick Dennis, Mark Dalton.camera, David Connell; editor, Michael Ornstein; production designer, Cary White; art director, Ed Vega; sound, John Pritchett; music, Lee Holdridge; casting, Julie Selzer, Jo Edna Boldin.

More Film

  • Lisa Borders Time's Up

    Time's Up President Lisa Borders Resigns

    Lisa Borders has resigned as president of Time’s Up, she and the organization announced on Monday. Borders is resigning due to family issues, she said in a statement. Time’s Up COO Rebecca Goldman will now serve as interim CEO. “As Time’s Up continues to grow, I am proud of the work I have done to [...]

  • Keira Knightly as "Rachael Morgan" in

    Film Review: Keira Knightley in 'The Aftermath'

    Less widely seen (and acclaimed) than it deserved to be, James Kent’s debut feature “Testament of Youth” was one of the great recent love-in-wartime dramas, translating the intimate romance and sprawling human tragedy of Vera Brittain’s WWI memoir with a grace and heft worthy of its David Lean allusions. Four years on, it’s not hard [...]

  • Inside Amazon's New Feature Film Strategy

    Amazon's New Film Strategy: Straight-to-Service Titles and Starry Sundance Buys

    It was close to midnight when Amazon Studios chief Jennifer Salke got the text. The company had failed in its quest to acquire “Brittany Runs a Marathon,” a body image dramedy that captivated Salke when she saw it at Sundance. A sales agent on the project messaged her to say that a competitor offered a [...]

  • Alfonso Cuaron71st Annual Writers Guild Awards,

    Alfonso Cuarón on Academy's 'Inevitable' Reversal on Televised Oscar Categories

    Alfonso Cuarón isn’t exactly surprised that the Academy reversed its decision and will now air all the Oscar categories during the live show on Sunday. Feb. 24. Calling the decision “inevitable,”Cuarón tells Variety that he thinks the Academy should take things even further. “Let’s stop calling them technical categories!” he told Variety on Sunday night [...]

  • TorinoFilmLab Announces Selections for 2019 ScriptLab

    TorinoFilmLab Announces Selections for 2019 ScriptLab (EXCLUSIVE)

    The TorinoFilmLab has announced the 20 feature projects and five story editor trainees who have been selected to take part in the 2019 edition of ScriptLab, an initiative focused on the development of fiction feature film scripts in early development stage. Beginning in March, this year’s participants will team up with filmmakers from around the [...]

  • Alita Battle Angel

    North American Box Office Declines From Last Year With Weak Presidents Day Weekend

    “Alita: Battle Angel” easily won a tepid Presidents Day weekend with a $34.2 million at 3,790 North American locations, estimates showed Monday. Overall domestic moviegoing for 2019 has plunged 22.1% to $1.24 billion as of Monday, according to Comscore. That’s $350 million below the same date a year ago and the lowest figure at this [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content