Traffic

Money makes the world go around in "Traffic," an abstract comedy about people who find wealth, people who lose it, people who never had it and people who had it all along. Never one to follow a conventional path, Portuguese director Joao Botelho assembles an eccentric ensemble of characters and a chaotic web of occasionally intersecting stories, but loses a few too many of them along the way, in a journey through his country from south to north. Often funny but more often indecipherable, this is a difficult prospect for anything but festival play.

Money makes the world go around in “Traffic,” an abstract comedy about people who find wealth, people who lose it, people who never had it and people who had it all along. Never one to follow a conventional path, Portuguese director Joao Botelho assembles an eccentric ensemble of characters and a chaotic web of occasionally intersecting stories, but loses a few too many of them along the way, in a journey through his country from south to north. Often funny but more often indecipherable, this is a difficult prospect for anything but festival play.

Botelho used a similar structure of multiple stories in his more concise 1994 feature, “Three Palm Trees.” But that film created a sense of unity through its single setting (Lisbon) and its employment of a storyteller to weave together the many unruly strands. The uneven new outing opts for a more anarchic approach , and, consequently, Botelho is less successful in keeping a firm grasp on all its various elements.

But any film that opens with the line “Jesus, get down off that dinosaur!” is not without merits, and “Traffic” gets off to a thoroughly engaging start. Jesus (Joaquim Oliveira) is a tyke vacationing off-season with his financially challenged parents (Rita Blanco, Adriano Luz) at a deserted Algarve beach resort. The kid transforms his family into millionaires overnight when he discovers a massive stash of drugs buried in the sand.

Other characters include a philandering banker who hears things (Joao Perry) and a minister who sees things (Andre Gomes); an arms-trafficking general (Mario Jacques) and his sculptress wife (Maria Emilia Correia), who specializes in Eves but wants to branch into Adams; a faded, alcoholic actress with chronic gas (Sao Jose Lapa); and two shepherd priests (Canto E Castro, Paulo Braganca) who, after literally losing their flock, decide to close up their church in the countryside , sell off their religious artifacts and hitchhike north.

Combining the surreal spirit of Bunuel with the brash humor of Almodovar, “Traffic” hits its share of high points and conjures lots of quirky interludes, such as a young priest crooning a fado to a lamb or an all-girl production of “Julius Caesar” staged for a group of politicians.

But while Botelho appears to be offering some kind of summation in a final scene in which two beggars (Jose Eduardo, Jose Pinto) recite a children’s fable in a vast rubbish dump in the far north, most audiences will be scratching their heads to fathom this rather obscure key to the director’s take on the rich and nouveau riche, power and poverty.

The lack of more concrete links between the stories gives the film a problematic, halting rhythm that gradually loses steam. But its luridly colorful design and the dazzling natural light that is unique to Portuguese films make it a consistent pleasure to watch.

Traffic

(COMEDY -- PORTUGUESE-FRENCH-DANISH)

Production: A Madragoa Filmes (Portugal)/Gemini Films (France)/Zentropa Prods. (Denmark) production. (International sales: Gemini Films, Paris.) Produced by Paulo Branco. Directed, written by Joao Botelho.

Crew: Camera (color), Olivier Gueneau; editor, Rodolfo Wedeles; production designer, Fernanda Morais; costume designer, Silvia Grabwoski; sound (Dolby Digital), Philippe Morel; assistant directors, Joao Fonseca, Jose Maria Vaz da Silva. Reviewed at Venice Film Festival (competing), Sept. 7, 1998. (Also in Toronto Film Festival --- Contemporary World Cinema.) Running time: 109 MIN.

With: With: Joaquim Oliveira, Rita Blanco, Adriano Luz, Branca Camargo, Joao Perry, Alexandra Lencastre, Maria Emilia Correia, Canto E Castro, Paulo Braganca, Mario Jacques, Maria Joao Luis, Dalila Carmo, Sao Jose Lapa, Andre Gomes, Isabel de Castro, Laura Soveral, Suzana Borges, Nuno Melo, Io Apolloni, Rosa Lobato Faria, Rogerio Vieira, Sofia Leite, Jose Eduardo, Jose Pinto.

More Film

  • THE PREDATOR Fox

    Director Shane Black Took a 'Butch-and-Sundance Approach' to 'The Predator'

    Money makes the world go around in “Traffic,” an abstract comedy about people who find wealth, people who lose it, people who never had it and people who had it all along. Never one to follow a conventional path, Portuguese director Joao Botelho assembles an eccentric ensemble of characters and a chaotic web of occasionally […]

  • Best Comic-Con 2018 Panels: 'Walking Dead'

    Comic-Con 2018's Can't-Miss Panels

    Money makes the world go around in “Traffic,” an abstract comedy about people who find wealth, people who lose it, people who never had it and people who had it all along. Never one to follow a conventional path, Portuguese director Joao Botelho assembles an eccentric ensemble of characters and a chaotic web of occasionally […]

  • NOW TV Jeff Goldblum statueNOW TV

    A 25-Foot Jeff Goldblum Statue Appears in London

    Money makes the world go around in “Traffic,” an abstract comedy about people who find wealth, people who lose it, people who never had it and people who had it all along. Never one to follow a conventional path, Portuguese director Joao Botelho assembles an eccentric ensemble of characters and a chaotic web of occasionally […]

  • Ashton Sanders, Antoine Fuqua, Director/Producer, and

    Denzel Washington Reveals Why 'Equalizer 2' Was His First Sequel

    Money makes the world go around in “Traffic,” an abstract comedy about people who find wealth, people who lose it, people who never had it and people who had it all along. Never one to follow a conventional path, Portuguese director Joao Botelho assembles an eccentric ensemble of characters and a chaotic web of occasionally […]

  • Alfonso Cuaron's 'Roma' Set as New

    Alfonso Cuaron's 'Roma' Set as New York Film Festival's Centerpiece

    Money makes the world go around in “Traffic,” an abstract comedy about people who find wealth, people who lose it, people who never had it and people who had it all along. Never one to follow a conventional path, Portuguese director Joao Botelho assembles an eccentric ensemble of characters and a chaotic web of occasionally […]

  • Database of Minority Entertainment Journalists, Critics

    Time's Up, USC Annenberg Launch Database of Underrepresented Journalists, Critics

    Money makes the world go around in “Traffic,” an abstract comedy about people who find wealth, people who lose it, people who never had it and people who had it all along. Never one to follow a conventional path, Portuguese director Joao Botelho assembles an eccentric ensemble of characters and a chaotic web of occasionally […]

  • No Merchandising. Editorial Use Only. No

    'The Dark Knight' and More Superhero Films that Wowed Fans and Critics

    Money makes the world go around in “Traffic,” an abstract comedy about people who find wealth, people who lose it, people who never had it and people who had it all along. Never one to follow a conventional path, Portuguese director Joao Botelho assembles an eccentric ensemble of characters and a chaotic web of occasionally […]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content