×
You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

The Lion King II: Simba’s Pride

Disney likely will set a new record for sales of a direct-to-video title when "The Lion King II: Simba's Pride" roars into retail outlets Oct. 27. And don't be surprised if some buyers aren't parents of small children. In marked contrast to most of the studio's small screen sequels to bigscreen animated hits, the new pic isn't merely kids' stuff.

With:
Simba - Matthew Broderick Kiara - Neve Campbell Nuka - Andy Dick Rafiki - Robert Guillaume Mufasa - James Earl Jones Nala - Moira Kelly Timon - Nathan Lane Kovu - Jason Marsden Zira - Suzanne Pleshette Pumbaa - Ernie Sabella

Disney likely will set a new record for sales of a direct-to-video title when “The Lion King II: Simba’s Pride” roars into retail outlets Oct. 27. And don’t be surprised if some buyers aren’t parents of small children. In marked contrast to most of the studio’s small screen sequels to bigscreen animated hits, the new pic isn’t merely kids’ stuff. Not unlike its predecessor, “Lion King II” has enough across-the-board appeal to entertain viewers of all ages.

The sequel begins where the 1994 original ended, with Simba (voiced by Matthew Broderick) established as king of beasts in the African Pridelands after the death of the wicked Scar. With his loving mate Nala (Moira Kelly) by his side, Simba officiates at the ceremonial introduction of his newborn, Kiara (Neve Campbell). The curtain-raiser owes a lot to the opening “Circle of Life” sequence from the first “Lion King,” to the point of being underscored by a similarly rousing song (“He Lives in You”). Once that’s out of the way, however, the new pic (directed by Darrell Rooney, co-directed by Rob LaDuca and written by Flip Kobler & Cindy Marcus) begins to establish its own identity.

Much to the dismay of the overly protective Simba, Kiara is an inquisitive and energetic free spirit who tends to wander off on misadventures. While prowling through the forbidden Outlands, where Scar’s minions have been banished, the Lion Princess befriends another rambunctious cub, Kovu (Jason Marsden).

Unfortunately, Kovu is the son of Zira (Suzanne Pleshette), the lioness who leads the pride of exiles. Even more unfortunately, Zira — a close friend of the late Scar — is eager to destroy Simba. At first, Kovu is a willing pawn in his mother’s plans for revenge. But as he grows older and falls in love with Kiara, things get appreciably more complicated.

Most of the original characters — and, better still, the original voices — are back for “Lion King II.” Once again, Nathan Lane and Ernie Sabella steal every scene that isn’t nailed down as, respectively, Timon, the mischievous meerkat, and Pumbaa, the flatulent warthog. Robert Guillaume gets a chance to shine as Rafiki when the sage mandrill cuts loose with “Upendi,” a playfully romantic ditty that echoes the jauntiness of the previous pic’s “Hakuna Matata.”

Among the newcomers, Campbell makes a winning impression as Kiara, while Pleshette is so effectively evil that she almost, but not quite, compensates for the absence of Jeremy Irons as Scar.

Animation, while hardly as lush and detailed as in the original, is markedly better than average for a direct-to-video production. Among the six new songs, the standouts include “We Are One,” an anthem-like showstopper, and the aforementioned “He Lives in You.” Latter, it’s worth noting, comes from a concept album (“Rhythm of the Pridelands”) inspired by the original 1994 pic. Subsequently, the song was incorporated into the Broadway production of “The Lion King.”

The Lion King II: Simba's Pride

Direct-to-Video

Production: A Buena Vista Home Entertainment release of a Walt Disney Home Video production. Produced by Jeannine Roussel. Directed by Darrell Rooney. Co-director, Rob LaDuca. Director of animation, Steven Trenbirth. Screenplay, Flip Kobler, Cindy Marcus.

Crew: dditional written material, Jenny Wingfield, Linda Voorhees, Gregory Poirier, Bill Motz, Bob Roth, Mark McCorkle, Robert Schooley, Jonathan Cuba. Editor, Peter N. Lonsdale; music score, Nick Glennie-Smith; art director, Fred Warter; sound (Dolby digital), David E. Stone; voice casting and dialogue director, Jamie Thomason. Reviewed on videocassette, Houston, Oct. 14, 1998. No MPAA rating. Running time: 75 MIN.

With: Simba - Matthew Broderick Kiara - Neve Campbell Nuka - Andy Dick Rafiki - Robert Guillaume Mufasa - James Earl Jones Nala - Moira Kelly Timon - Nathan Lane Kovu - Jason Marsden Zira - Suzanne Pleshette Pumbaa - Ernie SabellaA

More Film

  • Jason Flemyng, Casting Director Lucinda Syson

    Jason Flemyng, Lucinda Syson Launch Film and TV Indie The Kernel Factory (EXCLUSIVE)

    Jason Flemyng, fellow actor Ben Starr, casting director Lucinda Syson, and finance expert Cristiano D’Urso are opening The Kernel Factory, a new U.K.-based film and TV indie. Flemyng has a long list of movie credits including “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button,” “The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen,” and Guy Ritchie’s “Lock, Stock and Two Smoking [...]

  • Hache

    ‘Hache’ Creator, Director Discuss Netflix’s Next Spanish Original, Dropping Nov. 1

    MADRID — On Nov 1 Netflix will drop its fifth Spanish original series, 1960’s-set drug smuggling drama “Hache,” produced by Madrid’s Weekend Studio for the platform. Created by Verónica Fernández and directed by Jorge Torregrossa (“La vida inesperada,” “Cocaine Coast,” “Velvet Collection”), “Hache” tells the story of Helena (Adriana Ugarte), a prostitute who ends up [...]

  • Argentina Film Lab

    Argentina to Build Country’s First Film Restoration Laboratory in Buenos Aires

    Argentina’s Instituto Nacional de Cinematografia y las Artes Audiovisuals (INCAA) and the Ministry of Culture of the City of Buenos Aires will partner to build Argentina’s first laboratory of film preservation. Minister of Culture Enrique Avogadro and INCAA president Ralph Haiek signed the agreement which will see Buenos Aires’ Pablo Ducrós Hicken Film Museum in [...]

  • The-Ancient-Law

    Lumière Festival’s MIFC Broadens International Spotlight with Focus on Germany

    The 7th Lumière Film Festival’s International Classic Film Market (MIFC) is expanding its international scope this year with more foreign companies than ever before taking part in the event, high-profile guests and an examination of Germany’s heritage cinema sector. With 17 international firms from 25 countries at the event, the MIFC has reported a 20% [...]

  • US actor Donald Sutherland poses for

    Donald Sutherland Reflects in Lyon On A Life And Career Marked By Cinema

    In a loose and free-flowing on-stage interview held at the Lumière Festival this past Sunday, Donald Sutherland reflected on his decade-spanning career with a tone that mixed personal irreverence alongside genuine veneration for the art form that brought him this far. “I love filmmakers, I really do,” said the Canadian actor, who delighted the local [...]

  • Lucky Day

    Film Review: 'Lucky Day'

    It’s been 17 long years since “Rules of Attraction” director Roger Avary has released a film, during which time he was involved in a deadly car crash, charged with gross vehicle manslaughter, saw a work furlough translated into actual prison time, and watched things go south with Video Archives amigo Quentin Tarantino over the “Pulp [...]

  • Terry Back chairman ACF

    Veteran U.K. Media Investor Terry Back Joins ACF as Chairman

    CANNES — Veteran U.K. film industry investor Terry Back has joined ACF investment bank as chairman. ACF, headed by CEO Thomas Dey, has been at the forefront of the M&A activity around independent TV and film production outfits, mostly in the unscripted TV arena. ACF is in the midst of expanding its activities in the [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content