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When Innocence Is Lost

When Innocence Is Lost (Mon. (7), 9-11 p.m., Lifetime) Filmed in Toronto by Diana Kerew Prods. and Hearst Entertainment. Executive producer, Diana Kerew; producer, Sandra Saxon Brice; director, Bethany Rooney; writer, Deborah Jones; camera, Laszlo George; editor, Michael S. Murphy; production designer, Carmi Gallo; sound, Ao Loo; music, Dennis McCarthy; casting, Fern Orenstein (U.S.), Ross Clydesdale (Canada). Cast: Jill Clayburgh, Keri Russell, Roberta Maxwell, Vincent Corazza, Charlotte Sullivan, Barry Flatman, Dave Nichols, Julie Kahner, Deborah Grover, Alan Jordan, Shelley Thompson, Courtney and Nicole Greshuk, Phoenix and Mercedes Arn-Horn, Kris Holdenried, Marion Bennett, Nicole de Boer, Jonathan Potts, John Bourgeois, Dan MacDonald, Kathleen Laskey, Neil Dainard, Karen Kenedy, Kim Roberts. Inspired by a true story," as the legend on Deborah Jones' teleplay reads, "When Innocence Is Lost" reps a less-than-individual, grindingly familiar situation until the final moments. But persuasive Jill Clayburgh and pretty-as-a-picture Keri Russell give the soaper an admirable tussle, and under Bethany Rooney's sympathetic direction, the emotional story will dampen a hankie or two. "Innocence" itself is lost before the telepic kicks off. High school senior Erica (Russell), having kicked up her heels more than once, has fallen for symbolically named Scott Stone (Vincent Corazza), father of her baby-to-be. When Molly's born, rotter Scott disdains Erica and the baby; poor Erica, crushed, goes away to college to study humanities and eventually law with her infant. Lemon-juice mom Susan (Clayburgh) tries running the party, but Erica, though she accepts money from her parents, puts down both feet. Scott chips in nothing. His parents (Deborah Glover, cunningly delineating the anxious woman, runs off with any acting laurels; father's played by Alan Jordan) back him thoroughly. Their beef: While Erica's in school and at work, Molly's in a kiddies' center during the day when she'd be better off with blood relatives like themselves. Telefilm's sympathies lie with Erica, with her independent spirit and with daycare centers. Erica, scrubbing her wild earlier life by simply declaring it's in the past, now is virtuous, strong and determined. With everything stacked against the Stones, it seems certain that when the inevitable custody battle arrives, Erica will take home Molly. But writer Jones tosses in an unforeseen twist, and the Stones pull ahead. Nothing's said during a custody scamper about Scott bruising her and pushing her downstairs --- even though she had a witness. Scripter Jones hauls in a daycare advocate before the vidpic's hit the routine custody tracks. As for law school, it isn't in the cards, which is something of a jolt since the point of Erica's (and the telefilm's) energy is directed toward her right to a career while supporting a baby. The men are generally weak, wretched or props with only a few minor exceptions. The women come in varying shades of fixated and good, while Clayburgh's Susan is an odd mixture of both. Tech credits for Sandra Saxon Brice's production are superior, particularly Laszlo George's sensible lensing, Michael E. Murphy's exact editing. Carmi Gallo's production design is intelligent.

With:
Cast: Jill Clayburgh, Keri Russell, Roberta Maxwell, Vincent Corazza, Charlotte Sullivan, Barry Flatman, Dave Nichols, Julie Kahner, Deborah Grover, Alan Jordan, Shelley Thompson, Courtney and Nicole Greshuk, Phoenix and Mercedes Arn-Horn, Kris Holdenried, Marion Bennett, Nicole de Boer, Jonathan Potts, John Bourgeois, Dan MacDonald, Kathleen Laskey, Neil Dainard, Karen Kenedy, Kim Roberts

When Innocence Is Lost (Mon. (7), 9-11 p.m., Lifetime) Filmed in Toronto by Diana Kerew Prods. and Hearst Entertainment. Executive producer, Diana Kerew; producer, Sandra Saxon Brice; director, Bethany Rooney; writer, Deborah Jones; camera, Laszlo George; editor, Michael S. Murphy; production designer, Carmi Gallo; sound, Ao Loo; music, Dennis McCarthy; casting, Fern Orenstein (U.S.), Ross Clydesdale (Canada). Cast: Jill Clayburgh, Keri Russell, Roberta Maxwell, Vincent Corazza, Charlotte Sullivan, Barry Flatman, Dave Nichols, Julie Kahner, Deborah Grover, Alan Jordan, Shelley Thompson, Courtney and Nicole Greshuk, Phoenix and Mercedes Arn-Horn, Kris Holdenried, Marion Bennett, Nicole de Boer, Jonathan Potts, John Bourgeois, Dan MacDonald, Kathleen Laskey, Neil Dainard, Karen Kenedy, Kim Roberts. Inspired by a true story,” as the legend on Deborah Jones’ teleplay reads, “When Innocence Is Lost” reps a less-than-individual, grindingly familiar situation until the final moments. But persuasive Jill Clayburgh and pretty-as-a-picture Keri Russell give the soaper an admirable tussle, and under Bethany Rooney’s sympathetic direction, the emotional story will dampen a hankie or two. “Innocence” itself is lost before the telepic kicks off. High school senior Erica (Russell), having kicked up her heels more than once, has fallen for symbolically named Scott Stone (Vincent Corazza), father of her baby-to-be. When Molly’s born, rotter Scott disdains Erica and the baby; poor Erica, crushed, goes away to college to study humanities and eventually law with her infant. Lemon-juice mom Susan (Clayburgh) tries running the party, but Erica, though she accepts money from her parents, puts down both feet. Scott chips in nothing. His parents (Deborah Glover, cunningly delineating the anxious woman, runs off with any acting laurels; father’s played by Alan Jordan) back him thoroughly. Their beef: While Erica’s in school and at work, Molly’s in a kiddies’ center during the day when she’d be better off with blood relatives like themselves. Telefilm’s sympathies lie with Erica, with her independent spirit and with daycare centers. Erica, scrubbing her wild earlier life by simply declaring it’s in the past, now is virtuous, strong and determined. With everything stacked against the Stones, it seems certain that when the inevitable custody battle arrives, Erica will take home Molly. But writer Jones tosses in an unforeseen twist, and the Stones pull ahead. Nothing’s said during a custody scamper about Scott bruising her and pushing her downstairs — even though she had a witness. Scripter Jones hauls in a daycare advocate before the vidpic’s hit the routine custody tracks. As for law school, it isn’t in the cards, which is something of a jolt since the point of Erica’s (and the telefilm’s) energy is directed toward her right to a career while supporting a baby. The men are generally weak, wretched or props with only a few minor exceptions. The women come in varying shades of fixated and good, while Clayburgh’s Susan is an odd mixture of both. Tech credits for Sandra Saxon Brice’s production are superior, particularly Laszlo George’s sensible lensing, Michael E. Murphy’s exact editing. Carmi Gallo’s production design is intelligent.

When Innocence Is Lost

Mon. (7), 9-11 p.m., Lifetime

Production: Filmed in Toronto by Diana Kerew Prods. and Hearst Entertainment. Executive producer, Diana Kerew; producer, Sandra Saxon Brice; director, Bethany Rooney; writer, Deborah Jones;

Cast: Cast: Jill Clayburgh, Keri Russell, Roberta Maxwell, Vincent Corazza, Charlotte Sullivan, Barry Flatman, Dave Nichols, Julie Kahner, Deborah Grover, Alan Jordan, Shelley Thompson, Courtney and Nicole Greshuk, Phoenix and Mercedes Arn-Horn, Kris Holdenried, Marion Bennett, Nicole de Boer, Jonathan Potts, John Bourgeois, Dan MacDonald, Kathleen Laskey, Neil Dainard, Karen Kenedy, Kim Robertscamera, Laszlo George; editor, Michael S. Murphy; production designer, Carmi Gallo; sound, Ao Loo; music, Dennis McCarthy; casting, Fern Orenstein (U.S.), Ross Clydesdale (Canada).

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