×
You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

Prince Street

Prince Street (Thurs. (6); 10-11 p.m.; NBC) Filmed in New York and Toronto by Writer's Workbench Films and Warner Bros. TV. Executive producer, Robert Nathan; co-executive producer, Eric Overmyer; supervising producer, Michael Harbert; producer, Brooke Kennedy; director, Roger Spottiswoode; writers/co-creators, Nathan, Harbert; camera, Robert Elswit; editors, Michael Kewley, Ray Daniels III; production designer, Chris Nowak; sound, David Lee; music, Jan Hammer; casting, Barbara Miller, Alice Cassidy (L.A.), Suzanne Ryan (N.Y.). Cast: Mariska Hargitay, Vincent Spano, Steven Martini, Lawrence Monoson, Joe Morton, Christine Tucci, Victor Argo, Aaron Bata, Leonid Citer, Steve Ryan, Ken Garito, Tamara Tunie, Mark Margolis, Jose Zuniga, Bill Camp, Tom Spackman, Doris Belack, Michael Cullen, Bruce Kirkpatrick, John Tormey, Lynne Deregon, Elisa Moolecherry , John Boylan, Jacqualine Amato. Latest cop series entry, this one directed at a surefire clip by Roger Spottiswoode, centers on a onetime actual undercover unit of New York's finest, whose secret headquarters lie behind a Soho print shop on Prince Street. Never in uniforms, they carry no IDs or badges, wear disguises, and, on duty, they're deadly serious. They have every right to be --- thanks to the pilot's artifice and contrived plot lines. "Prince Street's" familiar cases --- after all, there are just so many crimes in the Big City --- hark back to other ideas. But Spottiswoode's put considerable ginger into the stories, and the Prince Street gang (Dana Eskelson's slated to join them as detective Dianne Hoffman) may be able to pull off enough interest to generate an audience in the familiar territory. As it stands, the production looks terrif no matter what the contents. Under the leadership of a less-than-authoritative Lt. Tom Warner (Joe Morton), the Prince Street gang hits its appointed targets. Experienced detective Alex Gage (Vincent Spano) toils with young cop Billy (Ken Garito) on a Russian gambol in a flower market. Gage endures a terrible sadness when his friend's assassinated. Creator-writers Robert Nathan and Michael Harbert, the actors and director Spottiswoode pull off a small but successful scene between Gage and Billy's dad (Steve Ryan); it's a touching vignette. Single-mom detective Nina Echeverria (Mariska Hargitay) finds herself investigating a Mr. Sullivan (Tom Spackman) and a Peruvian gang --- she changes lipstick and hairstyle as a disguise. Hargitay presents the character in such style it's tough to see how they can do anything but honor her. Instead, she finds herself kidnapped. Peppy detective James Tasio (Lawrence Monoson), whose wife's gone into labor, listens doubtfully to Nina's inappropriate and incorrect history of circumcision, but he's otherwise on Nina's side throughout. Latest addition to the bunch is rookie Anthony Libretti (Steven Martini), who's intrigued by the rest of the squad's hyper activities. A full office staff complements the team, but so far they're ciphers. Hargitay steals the first hour with her gutsy, purposeful Latino act, while Spano impressively projects Weltschmerz and an occasional comfortable smile, building a thoughtful characterization that could be a major draw. The program's speed and extensive cast of characters often blur in the fast-paced action devised by writers Nathan and Harbert. They write OK dialogue, but situation and sentiments too often ring phony. Most of the team's action takes place at night, so there's at least a suggestion of novelty. Production designer Chris Nowak's chief contribution, besides choice locales, is credibly matching Toronto footage to its N.Y. counterpart. Robert Elswit's lensing is pro, and editing by Michael Kewley and Ray Daniels III sure establishes appropriate timing. Jan Hammer's score, delicate but firm, fits the various occasions. Will "Prince Street," temporarily sitting in "ER's" slot, take off on its own? Seems unlikely, though director Spottiswoode cunningly tries to kick life into whiskery material. The real-life team started up in 1971 and secretly plied its trade for 20 years; "Prince Street's" way outmatched.

With:
Cast: Mariska Hargitay, Vincent Spano, Steven Martini, Lawrence Monoson, Joe Morton, Christine Tucci, Victor Argo, Aaron Bata, Leonid Citer, Steve Ryan, Ken Garito, Tamara Tunie, Mark Margolis, Jose Zuniga, Bill Camp, Tom Spackman, Doris Belack, Michael Cullen, Bruce Kirkpatrick, John Tormey, Lynne Deregon, Elisa Moolecherry, John Boylan, Jacqualine Amato.

Prince Street (Thurs. (6); 10-11 p.m.; NBC) Filmed in New York and Toronto by Writer’s Workbench Films and Warner Bros. TV. Executive producer, Robert Nathan; co-executive producer, Eric Overmyer; supervising producer, Michael Harbert; producer, Brooke Kennedy; director, Roger Spottiswoode; writers/co-creators, Nathan, Harbert; camera, Robert Elswit; editors, Michael Kewley, Ray Daniels III; production designer, Chris Nowak; sound, David Lee; music, Jan Hammer; casting, Barbara Miller, Alice Cassidy (L.A.), Suzanne Ryan (N.Y.). Cast: Mariska Hargitay, Vincent Spano, Steven Martini, Lawrence Monoson, Joe Morton, Christine Tucci, Victor Argo, Aaron Bata, Leonid Citer, Steve Ryan, Ken Garito, Tamara Tunie, Mark Margolis, Jose Zuniga, Bill Camp, Tom Spackman, Doris Belack, Michael Cullen, Bruce Kirkpatrick, John Tormey, Lynne Deregon, Elisa Moolecherry , John Boylan, Jacqualine Amato. Latest cop series entry, this one directed at a surefire clip by Roger Spottiswoode, centers on a onetime actual undercover unit of New York’s finest, whose secret headquarters lie behind a Soho print shop on Prince Street. Never in uniforms, they carry no IDs or badges, wear disguises, and, on duty, they’re deadly serious. They have every right to be — thanks to the pilot’s artifice and contrived plot lines. “Prince Street’s” familiar cases — after all, there are just so many crimes in the Big City — hark back to other ideas. But Spottiswoode’s put considerable ginger into the stories, and the Prince Street gang (Dana Eskelson’s slated to join them as detective Dianne Hoffman) may be able to pull off enough interest to generate an audience in the familiar territory. As it stands, the production looks terrif no matter what the contents. Under the leadership of a less-than-authoritative Lt. Tom Warner (Joe Morton), the Prince Street gang hits its appointed targets. Experienced detective Alex Gage (Vincent Spano) toils with young cop Billy (Ken Garito) on a Russian gambol in a flower market. Gage endures a terrible sadness when his friend’s assassinated. Creator-writers Robert Nathan and Michael Harbert, the actors and director Spottiswoode pull off a small but successful scene between Gage and Billy’s dad (Steve Ryan); it’s a touching vignette. Single-mom detective Nina Echeverria (Mariska Hargitay) finds herself investigating a Mr. Sullivan (Tom Spackman) and a Peruvian gang — she changes lipstick and hairstyle as a disguise. Hargitay presents the character in such style it’s tough to see how they can do anything but honor her. Instead, she finds herself kidnapped. Peppy detective James Tasio (Lawrence Monoson), whose wife’s gone into labor, listens doubtfully to Nina’s inappropriate and incorrect history of circumcision, but he’s otherwise on Nina’s side throughout. Latest addition to the bunch is rookie Anthony Libretti (Steven Martini), who’s intrigued by the rest of the squad’s hyper activities. A full office staff complements the team, but so far they’re ciphers. Hargitay steals the first hour with her gutsy, purposeful Latino act, while Spano impressively projects Weltschmerz and an occasional comfortable smile, building a thoughtful characterization that could be a major draw. The program’s speed and extensive cast of characters often blur in the fast-paced action devised by writers Nathan and Harbert. They write OK dialogue, but situation and sentiments too often ring phony. Most of the team’s action takes place at night, so there’s at least a suggestion of novelty. Production designer Chris Nowak’s chief contribution, besides choice locales, is credibly matching Toronto footage to its N.Y. counterpart. Robert Elswit’s lensing is pro, and editing by Michael Kewley and Ray Daniels III sure establishes appropriate timing. Jan Hammer’s score, delicate but firm, fits the various occasions. Will “Prince Street,” temporarily sitting in “ER’s” slot, take off on its own? Seems unlikely, though director Spottiswoode cunningly tries to kick life into whiskery material. The real-life team started up in 1971 and secretly plied its trade for 20 years; “Prince Street’s” way outmatched.

Popular on Variety

Prince Street

Thurs. (6); 10-11 p.m.; NBC

Production: Filmed in New York and Toronto by Writer's Workbench Films and Warner Bros. TV. Executive producer, Robert Nathan; co-executive producer, Eric Overmyer; supervising producer, Michael Harbert; producer, Brooke Ken-nedy; director, Roger Spottiswoode; writers/co-creators, Nathan, Harbert; camera, Robert Elswit; editors, Michael Kewley, Ray Daniels III

Crew: Production designer, Chris Nowak; sound, David Lee; music, Jan Hammer; casting, Bar-bara Miller, Alice Cassidy (L.A.), Suzanne Ryan (N.Y.).

Cast: Cast: Mariska Hargitay, Vincent Spano, Steven Martini, Lawrence Monoson, Joe Morton, Christine Tucci, Victor Argo, Aaron Bata, Leonid Citer, Steve Ryan, Ken Garito, Tamara Tunie, Mark Margolis, Jose Zuniga, Bill Camp, Tom Spackman, Doris Belack, Michael Cullen, Bruce Kirkpatrick, John Tormey, Lynne Deregon, Elisa Moolecherry, John Boylan, Jacqualine Amato.

More TV

  • TV Ratings: 'Dancing With the Stars'

    TV Ratings: 'Dancing With the Stars' Premiere Flat on Last Season

    Casting Sean Spicer on “Dancing With the Stars” doesn’t seem to be having the desired effect on ratings for ABC. The show premiered its new season to a 1.0 rating and just under 8 million total viewers. That’s the same rating as the Fall 2018 season premiere which was watched by 7.7 million viewers. The [...]

  • Inside Tinder's User-Controlled, Secret Streaming Sereis

    Inside Tinder's Secret Streaming Series (EXCLUSIVE)

    Popular dating app Tinder is set to release a choose-your-own-adventure-style original series in early October, marking its first outing as a content financier and distributor, numerous individuals close to the project told Variety. The series is set against an impending apocalypse, one of the insiders noted, and asks the question “Who would you spend your [...]

  • Streaming Wars Placeholder TV

    Explosion of Streaming Services Points to Price Wars on the Horizon

    With its $800 iPhones and $1,400 Hermès smart watches, Apple’s not exactly in the business of bargain-bin pricing. But the surprisingly low-priced debut of Apple TV Plus, at $4.99 per month for a family subscription, is a signal that the streaming video market of tomorrow — soon to be awash with services from Disney, WarnerMedia [...]

  • 'Family Reunion' Renewed for Season 2

    'Family Reunion' Renewed for Season 2 at Netflix

    Netflix has renewed the multi-generational live action comedy series “Family Reunion” for a second season. Loretta Devine, Tia Mowry-Hardrict, Anthony Alabi, Talia Jackson, Isaiah Russell-Bailey, Cameron J. Wright and Jordyn Raya James will all return for more of M’Dear’s home cooking and McKellan’s dance moves. “Family Reunion” follows the McKellans who move from Seattle to Georgia [...]

  • Cokie Roberts Dead: Journalist Savvy About

    Cokie Roberts, Journalist Savvy About Politics, Dies at 75

    Journalist Cokie Roberts, who was a contributing senior news analyst for NPR, a regular round-table analyst for “This Week With George Stephanopoulos” and a political commentator for ABC News, among many other contributions during a four-decade career, has died. She was 75. Roberts died Tuesday due to complications from breast cancer, her family confirmed. “Cokie’s [...]

  • Selena Gomez

    Selena Gomez-Produced Docuseries 'Living Undocumented' Ordered at Netflix

    Selena Gomez is set to produce a docuseries with Netflix. The series, entitled “Living Undocumented,” follows eight undocumented families who took the extraordinary risk of allowing film crews to chronicle their lives as they faced potential deportation. Ranging from harrowing to hopeful, their journeys illuminate and humanize the complex U.S. immigration system. The series depicts [...]

  • Veep cast - Outstanding Comedy Series69th

    'Veep' Cast, Kardashian Sisters Among Next Round of Emmy Presenters

    A “Veep” reunion is on tap this Sunday on the Emmy stage, as producers reveal the second round of presenters at this year’s ceremony. Emmy nominee Julia Louis-Dreyfus, who’s poised to make history on Sunday if she wins (giving her the title for most Emmy wins ever by a performer), will be joined on stage [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content