×
You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

The Red Address

Mix "Glengarry Glen Ross" with "Glen or Glenda" and the result might be something like David Ives' "The Red Address." A tough-talking drama that mixes business sharks, blackmail, cross-dressing and murder, "Address" wants to say something about the nature of manhood but totters as awkwardly as a burly actor in red satin heels.

With:
Cast: Kevin Anderson (E.G. Triplett), Ned Eisenberg (Dick), Welker White (Ann/Waitress/Prostitute), Jon DeVries (Driver), Cady McClain (Lady), Josh Hopkins (Soldier/Maitre d').

Mix “Glengarry Glen Ross” with “Glen or Glenda” and the result might be something like David Ives’ “The Red Address.” A tough-talking drama that mixes business sharks, blackmail, cross-dressing and murder, “Address” wants to say something about the nature of manhood but totters as awkwardly as a burly actor in red satin heels.

The play begins almost as a parody of David Mamet’s “Glengarry,” with two obscenity-spewing businessmen lamenting the arrival in town of a new (and possibly mob-connected) competitor. E.G. Triplett (Kevin Anderson) is the owner of a successful milk distributorship in an unidentified town, but his day and his business are about to go sour as his faithful (though jittery) associate Dick (Ned Eisenberg) suggests that the mysterious new rival named Driver has underworld ties.

Those fears are heightened when Driver (Jon DeVries), a cowboy-suited cutthroat with a limp and a menacing Southern drawl, arrives at Triplett’s office with a $5 million deal. “You can go into business with me,” Driver says, “or you can go out of business.”

Popular on Variety

The play soon takes one of several abrupt turns as the wheeler-dealing gives way to a bedroom encounter between E.G. and his loving Southern belle of a wife named Lady (Cady McClain). Attempting to soothe her man after a trying day, Lady purrs, “Would you like to go to the red address?,” the couple’s code for cross-dressing. Heels, lace panties, black nylons and a red dress brighten E.G.’s mood considerably.

But is E.G.’s secret safe? Driver begins dropping hints that he knows what’s what, setting E.G.’s personal and professional lives on a collision course. Then another of the play’s turns: a violent murder that has absolutely nothing to do with the previous plotlines, described in gratuitous detail in a monologue by a character who has no other relevance to the play.

The point of the brutal diversion is as unclear as the rest of “The Red Address.” The business intrigue comes to naught, the cross-dressing dilemma takes an even more melodramatic (and unconvincing) turn, and we’re left to wonder what all this angst has been for. Director Pamela Berlin draws good performances from the cast (although every last accent seems forced), but even an actress as appealing as Welker White can’t give credibility to some of Ives’ hokier dialogue. As a hard-boiled (and ludicrously judgmental) prostitute, White has to say “buster” and “pal” while dropping references to Lucretia Borgia.

For a play that prattles on about fate and inevitability, “The Red Address” goes nowhere. “What am I hurting by wearing this?” asks E.G. in his red frock, the likeliest answer being Ives’ growing reputation, buster.

The Red Address

McGinn-Cazale Theater, New York; 108 seats; $37.50 top

Production: A Second Stage Theater presentation of a play in one act by David Ives. Directed by Pamela Berlin. Set, Christine Jones.

Creative: Costumes, David C. Woolard; lighting, Donald Holder; sound, John Kilgore; production stage manager, Susan Whelan. Opened, reviewed Jan. 13, 1997. Running time: 1 HOUR, 40 MIN.

Cast: Cast: Kevin Anderson (E.G. Triplett), Ned Eisenberg (Dick), Welker White (Ann/Waitress/Prostitute), Jon DeVries (Driver), Cady McClain (Lady), Josh Hopkins (Soldier/Maitre d').

More Legit

  • The Thin Place review

    'The Thin Place': Theater Review

    I can’t resist: “The Thin Place” is a thin play. But before it drifts away into the eternal empyrean, this slender drama by Lucas Hnath (“A Doll’s House, Part 2,” “Hillary and Clinton”) tells a beguiling ghost story. Well, not exactly a ghost story, but the story of a beguiling haunting that may or may [...]

  • The Ocean at the End of

    'The Ocean at the End of the Lane': Theater Review

    Is Neil Gaiman’s “The Ocean at the End of the Lane” a story of childhood for adults or an adult view of the world for children? As director Katy Rudd’s astonishingly theatrical production of Joel Horwood’s adaptation resoundingly proves, the answer is: Both. Although wisely recommended for audiences above the age of twelve – the [...]

  • Warner Bros. Pictures trailer launch event

    Lin-Manuel Miranda and Jon M. Chu Tease 'In the Heights' Movie

    Lin-Manuel Miranda, director Jon M. Chu and star Anthony Ramos took the train to the top of the world to offer a sneak peek of “In the Heights,” Warner Bros.’ big-screen adaptation of Miranda’s (other) hit musical. “I’m thrilled we’re here, and I’m thrilled we’re uptown,” Miranda rhapsodized to a packed crowd at a cozy [...]

  • Lucas Hnath

    Listen: Lucas Hnath's Own Play Gives Him Nightmares

    Tony-nominated playwright Lucas Hnath (“A Doll’s House, Part 2”) has two shows in New York this season: a monologue based on the real-life experiences of his mother, and a ghost story. One of them gave him nightmares — but it wasn’t the ghost story. Listen to this week’s podcast below: He explained why on the [...]

  • Greater Clements review

    'Greater Clements': Theater Review

    The American Dream and all of its values have taken quite a beating lately. Director and screenwriter Noah Baumbach’s “Marriage Story,” Bruce Springsteen’s recent “Western Stars” album, even Ralph Lauren in the documentary “Very Ralph” show us how this country and all of its totems and merits have gone asunder. No dreams are more crushed, [...]

  • Harry Connick Jr Walk of Fame

    Harry Connick Jr. on Returning to Broadway

    Harry Connick Jr. is headed back to Broadway with a three-week limited engagement celebration of legendary songwriter Cole Porter. The actor and musician came up with the concept for the show and is also directing. “I love Broadway and if I had two careers one of them would be only Broadway just because I love [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content